Date   

Re: Possibility of getting Utah Coal Route Gons done in resin???

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Andy Carlson wrote:
You might feel different if it was your 100 + hour
labor...
Sure, and I understand why a person might want to sell copies from the molds; others might prefer to loan molds, not masters. But to make a master and then deny it to anyone else is exactly like rescuing railroad records or photos and then locking them up in your garage. But of course YMMV.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Possibility of getting Utah Coal Route Gons done in resin???

Andy Carlson
 

Tony,
You might feel different if it was your 100 + hour
labor...
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

--- Anthony Thompson <thompson@signaturepress.com>
wrote:

And hopefully make a few available (or loan
the masters) for
others to do the same. The labor on a master
shouldn't be hidden under
a bushel.


Re: Possibility of getting Utah Coal Route Gons done in resin???

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Gatwood, Elden wrote:
Are they so difficult you would not consider doing the master yourself;
and casting them up in the dozens to meet your need?
And hopefully make a few available (or loan the masters) for others to do the same. The labor on a master shouldn't be hidden under a bushel.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Possibility of getting Utah Coal Route Gons done in resin???

Gatwood, Elden <Elden.Gatwood@...>
 

Jason;
As Martin Lofton has said to me so many times, "if you build the
masters, I will offer it." He has also said that he hears regularly
about projects for whom people have gotten a lot of commitments (like I
did, at one time). It doesn't seem to impress him or Al. Even for a
re-run of a PRR kit Martin did, with an article featuring his
"now-out-of-production" kit to sell it for him!

And, unless you can find someone to do it, the chances of convincing one
of the few people that actually do it might be pretty slim. They seem
to have their own, fairly specific, interests. You notice what the
majority of RRs for whom there are resin kits are made for? It is the
only thing that explains the absence of certain cars....and roads.

Are they so difficult you would not consider doing the master yourself;
and casting them up in the dozens to meet your need?

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Jason
Sent: Monday, September 12, 2005 3:02 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Possibility of getting Utah Coal Route Gons done in
resin???

Maybe I am living a pipe dream but it seems like there are a
significant number of modelers who would like some of the UCR gons,
what are the chances of getting a resin company like Sunshine or
Westerfield to produce these if we were able to gain a large number of
firm commits? Anyone tried anything similar to this? Give me a
reality check if I need it, please!


Jason Sanford
"Need some UCR gons for the Park City Local"






Yahoo! Groups Links


Possibility of getting Utah Coal Route Gons done in resin???

ogdentowebercanyon
 

Maybe I am living a pipe dream but it seems like there are a
significant number of modelers who would like some of the UCR gons,
what are the chances of getting a resin company like Sunshine or
Westerfield to produce these if we were able to gain a large number of
firm commits? Anyone tried anything similar to this? Give me a
reality check if I need it, please!


Jason Sanford
"Need some UCR gons for the Park City Local"


Input on The Keystone Modeler

Gatwood, Elden <Elden.Gatwood@...>
 

Thanks to all that responded to my request for input on TKM. It is
greatly appreciated.



I got a lot of useful information from your replies. We will definitely
consider each and every request, although availability of some of the
data may make some requests problematic. Nevertheless, it is the kind
of information I'd like to see myself!



If any of you have been considering doing an article on a PRR subject,
and can take good digital pics (or know someone that can do them for
you), please contact us.



We view this adventure as being a group thing. Hopefully, we have
minimized any ego issues, and just give you information that you can
use. Therefore, we would hope that everyone feels that they can
contribute, in any way, to the effort.



For all that have contributed, my continued thanks.



Feel free to drop me a line.





Elden Gatwood

PRRT&HS Modeling Committee


Re: Wabash hoppers

buchwaldfam <duff@...>
 

OK, two strikes against me for this reply: ot conclusive as far
as final destination, and it was a gondola, not a hopper: however in
the last two issues, Milwaukee Road Historical Association's TMR
magazine ran a two part article covering MILW operations in Sioux
City, Iowa. One photo shows the results of a runaway MILW freight: a
grounded, fairly twisted, freshly painted Wabash war emergency
gondola full of coal.
Mainline Modeler ran some drawings of this car several years
ago. I would like one, but couldn't justify running it on Milwaukee
rails... that photo's my excuse!

Regards,
Phil Buchwald


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Chet French" <cfrench@g...> wrote:
--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Richard White" <rhwhite@b...> wrote:
"Chet French" wrote
My computer was down for several days so I didn't get to be
the
first
one to tell you that the car was a WE hopper from the 39000-
39399
series. Cars received steel sides in 1956. Photo was taken
looking
west just east of the Wabash roundhouse and engine servicing
area.
Tracks on the far left are in the B&O yard and the tracks that
the
derailed cars are on might be the interchange tracks between
the
Wabash and B&O.
Where did Wabash hoppers load coal and how far afield did the
haul
it?
Or, to rephrase the question, whereabouts might we have expected
to
see
Wabash hoppers regularly?
Richard,

By 1950, the Wabash served ten mines online in Illinois, Iowa,
and
Missouri. The biggest activity was at Mt Olive and Staunton, IL
where
two mines orginated 10,899 carloads that year. The Mark Twain mine
in
Huntsville, MO, just west of Moberly loaded 8613 cars in 1950, and
the
Pershing Mine in Tracy Iowa, 2853 car loads. Peabody #58 located
in
Taylorville, Il loaded 1751 cars. This mine, I believe, was
jointly
served by the Wabash and the C&IM. On line tonnage represented
about
30% of the total Wabash coal tonnage in 1950.

Most of the coal from the Mt Olive and Staunton area went to power
plants, industrial users, and to the Ann Arbor Railroad for boat
and
steam locomotive fuel. Much of it also went to coal chutes on the
Wabash for locomotives. The Ford Motor Company in the Detroit
area
received coal from this area in the 1930's and 1940's. Much of
the
coal from the Missouri mine went to power plants in the Kansas City
area
and also for use by the Wabash locomotives on the west end of the
railroad. Most of this information comes from an informative
article
written by Mark Vaughn titled "Coal on The Wabash" which appeared
in
the Winter 1993 issue of "The Banner", the publication of the
Wabash
HS.

Wabash hopper cars were also used to protect sand and
gravel loading on-line and also functioned as ballast cars for the
railroad.

Chet French
Dixon, IL


Re: Milk CARS on the Santa Fe?

Richard White
 

My family fed whey to pigs but I understand it was also used as a source of
casein which was used to make wood working glue before the days of PVA.
Richard White

----- Original Message -----
Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net>
Subject: Re: Milk CARS on the Santa Fe?


Mike, there is a 1950's photo of SP 6323, a 60 ft Harriman
baggage car, clearly stenciled "Milk & Cream" sitting on a
siding at a passenger station. So yes, without a doubt the
western roads handled milk cans.

As I understand it, back before margarine, the whey was more
or less considered useless, and it was primarily the cream
that was desired. I seem to recall reading that in many cases
the whey was back-hauled after the cream had been extracted.
Any one else know about that, and what the whey would have
been used for if not for pasteurized milk? Paint perhaps?
Glue?

Tim O'Connor






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Re: Digest Number 2656

ljack70117@...
 

On Sep 12, 2005, at 8:09 AM, Indian640@aol.com wrote:

In a message dated 9/12/2005 3:46:38 AM Eastern Standard Time,
STMFC@yahoogroups.com writes:
Any one else know about that, and what the whey would have
been used for if not for pasteurized milk?
Sold, or swapped, bartered, back to the farmers to be added to animal food;
-- fed to hogs.

Mal Houck
Hey guess what, I worked in a creamery in Salina, Ks, name was Harding Co. We only received the cream. All rhe farmers in Ks. we dealt with had separators. Most farmers kept their skim milk and fed it to their calves and hogs. We even received cream from the Tesscott Cheese Co. All the wanted was the milk and they bought whole milk and sold us the cream. We received it in 10 gallon cans. We paid 50 cents a pound for the bitter fat and 4 cent bonus if it was less than 4 days old. Most cans averaged 40/45% fat. It was all sour and we added an alkali to sweeten it. The alkali remained in the butter milk and made it unfit for human use. We pumped it to a large tank on the roof and pig farmers came by and bought it for 1 cent a gallon and slopped their hogs with it.
Butter milk you buy in your local store is a fake. They take skim milk and add an agent to sour it and then add very small pieces of butter. Mmmmmm good.
When I was in the creamy we used two large wooden churns that would hold 50 cans of cream. Pulling and boxing was done by hand. Today they use a continuous process that you dump the cream in one end of the machine. It sweetens the cream. pasteurizes it. churns the butter and puts it in boxes. The butter milk comes out another line to where ever they store it.
When we had a refer ( not the kind you smoke) full of butter we would load it and ship it. Most of our butter was sold to the government.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@adelphia.net
Shin: A device for finding furniture in the dark.


Re: C&NW "billboard" letters

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Doug Harding wrote:
"Tim, are you sure it reads 1950? When I click on the link you provided
(others might want to try that technique before responding) the photo
caption clearly reads March 1959, not 1950. Knowing Ron Christensen, the
photographer I doubt the date listed is in error."

Doug, the original caption indeed read 1950. Ron corrected the caption
earlier this morning and posted a notice to the list.


Ben Hom


Re: C&NW "billboard" letters

Douglas Harding <d.harding@...>
 

Tim, are you sure it reads 1950? When I click on the link you provided
(others might want to try that technique before responding) the photo
caption clearly reads March 1959, not 1950. Knowing Ron Christensen, the
photographer I doubt the date listed is in error.

Doug Harding
Iowa Central Railroad
http://d.harding.home.mchsi.com


Re: Bev-Bel offerings

Montford Switzer <ZOE@...>
 

Rob,

My experience with Bev-Bel is that prototype accuracy is not a high
priority. I would research any potential purchase thoroughly before
buying.

They are nice folks, though.

Mont Switzer

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Anthony Thompson
Sent: Monday, September 12, 2005 12:33 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Bev-Bel offerings

Rob Kirkham wrote:
. . . I am
wondering if this is a case of applying the right paint job to the
wrong
car? Does Bev-Bel have a reputation for matching the two precisely?
Rob, I had no idea you were such a romantic. Or, to summarize
differently, not so far.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history




Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: C&NW "billboard" letters

ron christensen
 

You are correct the date was wrong.
I checked the photo again and it was taken in March 1959. The
date has been corrected.
Ron Christensen



--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor
<timboconnor@c...> wrote:

Thanks Ed, and Ben... I just moved again (!) and the library is
"offline" for a few weeks. I thought the date on that photo was
too good to be true... and so it was!



Beginning in 1954 the CNW started to stray from the use of
their train
slogans with an order of 50' box cars built by AC&F. These
had the
"ball and bar" emblem and no slogans. The earliest new cars
that I've
seen having billboard letters is late 1955, although these
cars had an
ampersand the same height as the letters and the stencils
were applied
to the right of the door opening. Jeff Koeller has studied all of
CNW's
stenciling schemes and variants and would no doubt have a
precise
answer to your question. Being able to read the reweigh date
would
provide a good time estimate.

Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: Bev-Bel offerings

Greg Bartek
 

Rob,

In a word, no. I've seen more than my share of "phantom" car/road name
offerings. I have not seen the ad you mention and am not familiar with
the Imperial Oil line tankers, so the accuracy of those I cannot
comment on.

Greg Bartek

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Rob Kirkham <rdkirkham@s...> wrote:
Hi,

I just noticed the add in Sept. RMC, p.26, for Bev-Bel Corp, selling
kits
and assembled models of Imperial Oil (and affiliated) tank cars. The
art
work looks good enough from what can be seen in the photos, but I am
wondering if this is a case of applying the right paint job to the
wrong
car? Does Bev-Bel have a reputation for matching the two precisely?

thanks
Rob Kirkham


Re: Digest Number 2656

Malcolm H. Houck
 

In a message dated 9/12/2005 3:46:38 AM Eastern Standard Time,
STMFC@yahoogroups.com writes:
Any one else know about that, and what the whey would have
been used for if not for pasteurized milk?
Sold, or swapped, bartered, back to the farmers to be added to animal food;
-- fed to hogs.

Mal Houck


Re: Milk CARS on the Santa Fe?

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Chuck Yungkurth writes:
From the charts and data we concluded that milk tank and other cars built
exclusively for milk cans were pretty much a much a Northeastern phenomena.
The traffic went mostly to NYC and Boston with a small amount to
Philadelphia. There was also some into Chicago from Wisconsin.
I don't know about the Santa Fe, but there was milk traffic into Los Angeles in the 1920s and 1930s from along the coast (Oxnard, etc.) which was carried as cans in baggage cars. I would not be surprised if there was also similar traffic from east of the city.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Bev-Bel offerings

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Rob Kirkham wrote:
. . . I am
wondering if this is a case of applying the right paint job to the wrong
car? Does Bev-Bel have a reputation for matching the two precisely?
Rob, I had no idea you were such a romantic. Or, to summarize differently, not so far.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Bev-Bel offerings

Rob Kirkham <rdkirkham@...>
 

Hi,

I just noticed the add in Sept. RMC, p.26, for Bev-Bel Corp, selling kits and assembled models of Imperial Oil (and affiliated) tank cars. The art work looks good enough from what can be seen in the photos, but I am wondering if this is a case of applying the right paint job to the wrong car? Does Bev-Bel have a reputation for matching the two precisely?

thanks
Rob Kirkham


Re: Intermountain FGE reefers

Andy Carlson
 

At the San Diego N scale meet last month, Matt of IM
told me to expect them some time early in 06.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

--- Brian J Carlson <brian@bluemoon.net> wrote:

The upcoming Intermountain FGE Reefers were covered
in an article in the
February 2005 issue of RMJ. We discussed the models
on the list back then,
but I haven't heard an update on when the models
will be released in a long
time. Now that the ATSF Stock car and milk cars have
been released I was
wondering if anyone knows when we can expect the
reefers? Thanks

Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY



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Re: Milk CARS on the Santa Fe?

Tim O'Connor
 

Mike, there is a 1950's photo of SP 6323, a 60 ft Harriman
baggage car, clearly stenciled "Milk & Cream" sitting on a
siding at a passenger station. So yes, without a doubt the
western roads handled milk cans.

As I understand it, back before margarine, the whey was more
or less considered useless, and it was primarily the cream
that was desired. I seem to recall reading that in many cases
the whey was back-hauled after the cream had been extracted.
Any one else know about that, and what the whey would have
been used for if not for pasteurized milk? Paint perhaps?
Glue?

Tim O'Connor

That's been my guess in the West. A big researcher of the milk biz here in
the East, I was amazed to come across occasional milk cans on front porches and
supporting mail boxes during my 1990s travals around the backroads and
branchlines of California and a couple of the square states. I looked closely at
one or two that were embossed with the names of local creameries. They had to
travel by either wagon, truck or baggage car, I deduced. I do recall seeing
somewhere an SP train on either the Lodi or Tracy branch with a milk can visible
through an open baggage door.

....Mike Del Vecchio

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