Date   

New Walthers USRA based cars

Bruce Smith
 

Folks,


The new Walthers flyer includes four new steam era freight cars:


40' double sheathed USRA boxcar

https://www.walthers.com/40-usra-wood-boxcar-ready-to-run-undecorated


40' USRA single sheathed boxcar

https://www.walthers.com/40-usra-composite-boxcar-ready-to-run-undecorated

- dang, look at those boards! SMH


40' steel USRA rebuilt wood boxcar

https://www.walthers.com/40-steel-rebuilt-usra-wood-boxcar-ready-to-run-undecorated


40' Early Wood Reefer

https://www.walthers.com/40-early-wood-reefer-ready-to-run-undecorated

This looks like a USRA reefer.


These cars are in the WalthersMainline series and have molded on grab irons. Interestingly the "single sheathed boxcar" appears to not have the classic USRA underframe that the other 3 cars show. These may make some interesting detailing and kit bashing fodder.


Regards,

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL



Re: this nice shot of the GM&O freight house

Aley, Jeff A
 

Attached is a map and an aerial photo.  The aerial photo shows the sheer density of steam-era freight cars in this part of Kansas City.

 

Regards,

 

-Jeff

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Monday, April 29, 2019 4:34 PM
To: STMFC <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] this nice shot of the GM&O freight house

 

Hi List Members,

 

Consider for a moment this nice shot of the GM&O freight house surrounded by steam era freight cars...

 

 

I have a question about how this all works regarding delivery of goods to the customer. Freight cars get parked here, they are unloaded into the freight house by fork lift or hand truck or elbow grease, right? Then what? How does the customer get their goods? Presumably they show up wuth their comapny truck (or in earlier days, with their horse-drawn cart). But I don't see any good street access to the building. Is it on the side of the building we cannot see? I'm thinking maybe not, since there are probably tracks there.

 

This is not the first time I've seen freight houses with what appears to be inadequate or non-existant street access. How was this handled? Presumably every inbound carload of items that goes INTO the freight house has to leave as well, and it's not leaving in a freight car, right?

 

Thoughts?

 

Overall, if you omit the large yard in the background, and included only the three tracks in the foreground with the building, a scene like this is very model-genic, and could serve as the focal point of a very nice switching layout or a fun area of activity within a larger layout.

 

Claus Schlund

 

 


Re: Throwback Tuesday: Model Die Casting 40 ft AAR Boxcar, Model Railroader, October 1959

James Lackner
 

It looked like a great deal, until I saw the 15 cents for postage.
Deal breaker!

Jim Lackner


Re: Cornel University collection

Nolan Hinshaw
 

On Apr 29, 2019, at 3:17 PM, James SANDIFER wrote:

Interesting piece of trackwork.
https://digital.library.cornell.edu/catalog/ss:20864642
The straddle loader between the Cadillac and the flatcar takes me back...
--
^<@<.@*
}"_# |
-@$&/_%
!(^I@|=>
;`+$?^?
,#"~|)^G


Re: Manufacturers Railway Mather box

Steven D Johnson
 

Clarification – The TC prototypes were 8’ 6” IH, taller than the what the P2K cars represent, which are 7’8” IH cars, if I recall correctly.

 

Steve Johnson

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Steven D Johnson
Sent: Tuesday, April 30, 2019 5:56 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Manufacturers Railway Mather box

 

Proto 2000 produced the Mather boxcar decorated for Tennessee Central, but the TC prototypes were the taller version.  Sunshine produced the taller and correct TC model. 

 

I seem to recall hearing that the P2K Mather boxcars were based off their Mather stock car, thus the boxcar models were of the lower height version.

 

Steve Johnson

Nashville, TN

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tony Thompson
Sent: Tuesday, April 30, 2019 11:37 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Manufacturers Railway Mather box

 

Big surprise here, folks: proto2000 only made one height of Mather car. 

Tony Thompson 


On Apr 30, 2019, at 6:19 AM, Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:

Mather produced boxcars with a few different interior heights. There were also some 36-foot Mather boxcars rolling around before 1930. Just because it is labeled as a Mather boxcar, stock car, or reefer does not mean they are all the same. They came from the same builder. IIRC, at one point the AC&Y had two series of Mather boxcars with different interior heights.

 

I suspect the Proto2000 models produced by Life-Like followed prototypes for certain time frames. Mather leased these cars and they were reused after leases expired. The cars returned to the Mather shops for repaint and reletter for the new lessee. You will need to consult the ORER for your modeling period to determine where the Mather cars were used.

 

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of mopacfirst
Sent: Tuesday, April 30, 2019 8:00 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Manufacturers Railway Mather box

 

I can see an issue on the height, because from looking at the pictures of car bodies from the Proto kits on eBay, they all look the same even though there were some that were quite a bit taller.  I found another good source in an ad for RY models in O scale, and there the cars are separated by height.  The one I'm thinking of is 7'-8" IH, which seemed to be a common height, but others were as high inside as 10'-3" and the model photos of Proto cars seem to show that they're not.

I found the Hendrickson article from August 2003 and unfortunately there is no table attached, but there the photos also seem to show height differences.

But I thought those were channels (C-sections) on the diagonals, not Z-sections like a "normal" single-sheathed box had.

Ron Merrick

Ron Merrick


Re: Manufacturers Railway Mather box

Steven D Johnson
 

Proto 2000 produced the Mather boxcar decorated for Tennessee Central, but the TC prototypes were the taller version.  Sunshine produced the taller and correct TC model. 

 

I seem to recall hearing that the P2K Mather boxcars were based off their Mather stock car, thus the boxcar models were of the lower height version.

 

Steve Johnson

Nashville, TN

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tony Thompson
Sent: Tuesday, April 30, 2019 11:37 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Manufacturers Railway Mather box

 

Big surprise here, folks: proto2000 only made one height of Mather car. 

Tony Thompson 


On Apr 30, 2019, at 6:19 AM, Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:

Mather produced boxcars with a few different interior heights. There were also some 36-foot Mather boxcars rolling around before 1930. Just because it is labeled as a Mather boxcar, stock car, or reefer does not mean they are all the same. They came from the same builder. IIRC, at one point the AC&Y had two series of Mather boxcars with different interior heights.

 

I suspect the Proto2000 models produced by Life-Like followed prototypes for certain time frames. Mather leased these cars and they were reused after leases expired. The cars returned to the Mather shops for repaint and reletter for the new lessee. You will need to consult the ORER for your modeling period to determine where the Mather cars were used.

 

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of mopacfirst
Sent: Tuesday, April 30, 2019 8:00 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Manufacturers Railway Mather box

 

I can see an issue on the height, because from looking at the pictures of car bodies from the Proto kits on eBay, they all look the same even though there were some that were quite a bit taller.  I found another good source in an ad for RY models in O scale, and there the cars are separated by height.  The one I'm thinking of is 7'-8" IH, which seemed to be a common height, but others were as high inside as 10'-3" and the model photos of Proto cars seem to show that they're not.

I found the Hendrickson article from August 2003 and unfortunately there is no table attached, but there the photos also seem to show height differences.

But I thought those were channels (C-sections) on the diagonals, not Z-sections like a "normal" single-sheathed box had.

Ron Merrick

Ron Merrick


Re: Manufacturers Railway Mather box

mopacfirst
 

Probably the only Mather boxcar I would ever have use for is the MRS car.  I picked up one of the MRS low height cars, which could just barely fit into my timeframe.  The taller one, I'll have to be watching for but its prototype lasted long enough to truly be appropriate for me.  If Anheuser-Busch shipped byproducts of brewing to Kansas for ag use, I'm there.

I think I have enough Proto Mather stock cars for my needs.  I now need to build some of the others so the Mather cars don't unduly dominate the roster.  Same thing was true of gons -- I built enough of the Proto Bethlehem gons that it's taken me years of Tangent gons, and building F&C and Sunshine gons, that the proportions are now finally getting close to right.

Ron Merrick


Re: grab iron ladders

steve_wintner
 

Thanks Paul, I've not thought of that approach. George, very nice technique, thanks to both for sharing.

Steve


Re: grab iron ladders

frograbbit602
 

George I like the stops and will add to my jigs. Thanks for sharing.
Lester Breuer


Re: Manufacturers Railway Mather box

Brian Carlson
 

On Apr 30, 2019, at 3:36 PM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


Didn't Sunshine produce two heights of Mather box cars? Or was it the stock cars?



Re: Manufacturers Railway Mather box

Tim O'Connor
 

Didn't Sunshine produce two heights of Mather box cars? Or was it the stock cars?

On 4/30/2019 9:00 AM, mopacfirst wrote:
I can see an issue on the height, because from looking at the pictures of car bodies from the Proto kits on eBay, they all look the same even though there were some that were quite a bit taller.  I found another good source in an ad for RY models in O scale, and there the cars are separated by height.  The one I'm thinking of is 7'-8" IH, which seemed to be a common height, but others were as high inside as 10'-3" and the model photos of Proto cars seem to show that they're not.

I found the Hendrickson article from August 2003 and unfortunately there is no table attached, but there the photos also seem to show height differences.

But I thought those were channels (C-sections) on the diagonals, not Z-sections like a "normal" single-sheathed box had.

Ron Merrick
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Re: Throwback Tuesday: Model Die Casting 40 ft AAR Boxcar, Model Railroader, October 1959

Benjamin Hom
 

Bob Chapman wrote:
"The all-metal tag line is interesting, but I'm even more intrigued with the "two hours of fun (shaking the box)" text."

Come to think of it, these would have been shake-the-box compared to an Athearn metal boxcar kit.


Ben Hom


Re: Throwback Tuesday: Model Die Casting 40 ft AAR Boxcar, Model Railroader, October 1959

Bob Chapman
 

Ben --


The all-metal tag line is interesting, but I'm even more intrigued with the "two hours of fun (shaking the box)" text.        :) 


Regards,

Bob Chapman


Re: grab iron ladders

Nelson Moyer
 

Thanks, George. I like the stop at the end of the jig to square the rungs and stiles, especially for etched rungs. The grab iron legs serve that function when using grab iron rungs.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of gtws00 via Groups.Io
Sent: Tuesday, April 30, 2019 8:30 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] grab iron ladders

 

In my opinion the .005 brass works OK. Nice thing is that the rungs and stiles all line up and are square. Once the ladder is assembled and mounted it becomes fairly strong and rigid. I use a modified version of your jig as seen on the RCW Blog. I have attached a photo of how I did mine. Kinda of in a hurry this AM when I put this together and did not do a clean shear on the one end. My version of the assembly fixture includes a stop for the flat stile as well as a stop at the top of the fixture that stick up and holds the rung square to the stile. In my sample photos I did not secure with CA , just a mock up for this topic. Also is a photo of a UUM-USA Photo Etch bending tool with a build in bending brake. 
George Toman


Re: Throwback Tuesday: Model Die Casting 40 ft AAR Boxcar, Model Railroader, October 1959

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Friends,

This was about the tail end for the all-metal cars, although MDC stuck with cast metal underframes for a long, long time. I think MDC was doing plastic shells on some cars as early as 1958.
Some of MDC's earliest plastic cars were actually rebranded Athearn kits, which (IIRC) included the Athearn 50' gondola sold in the Roundhouse/MDC packaging.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 4/30/19 9:21 AM, Benjamin Hom wrote:
Model Die Casting 40 ft AAR Boxcar ad, Model Railroader, October 1959.  Note the "Metal's Better" tagline.


Ben Hom


Re: this nice shot of the GM&O freight house NKP Boxcar against the freight house

Eric Hansmann
 

A former Wheeling & Lake Erie that mostly followed the 1923 ARA proposed-standard all-steel boxcar design. Interestingly, the underframes followed the 1923 ARA XM-1 standard wood-sheathed design.

 

1000 cars were installed in early 1925.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of gary laakso
Sent: Tuesday, April 30, 2019 11:29 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] this nice shot of the GM&O freight house NKP Boxcar against the freight house

 

The NKP boxcar is the short car against the freight house, fourth from the top.  These pictures are fun to see as they enlarge so easily.

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

 

 

 

Hi List Members,

 

Consider for a moment this nice shot of the GM&O freight house surrounded by steam era freight cars...

 

 

I have a question about how this all works regarding delivery of goods to the customer. Freight cars get parked here, they are unloaded into the freight house by fork lift or hand truck or elbow grease, right? Then what? How does the customer get their goods? Presumably they show up with their company truck (or in earlier days, with their horse-drawn cart) But I don't see any good street access to the building. Is it on the side of the building we cannot see? I'm thinking maybe not, since there are probably tracks there.

 

This is not the first time I've seen freight houses with what appears to be inadequate or non-existent street access. How was this handled? Presumably every inbound carload of items that goes INTO the freight house has to leave as well, and it's not leaving in a freight car, right?

 

Thoughts?

 

Overall, if you omit the large yard in the background, and included only the three tracks in the foreground with the building, a scene like this is very model-genic, and could serve as the focal point of a very nice switching layout or a fun area of activity within a larger layout.

 

Claus Schlund

 

 


Re: Manufacturers Railway Mather box

Tony Thompson
 

Big surprise here, folks: proto2000 only made one height of Mather car. 
Tony Thompson 


On Apr 30, 2019, at 6:19 AM, Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:

Mather produced boxcars with a few different interior heights. There were also some 36-foot Mather boxcars rolling around before 1930. Just because it is labeled as a Mather boxcar, stock car, or reefer does not mean they are all the same. They came from the same builder. IIRC, at one point the AC&Y had two series of Mather boxcars with different interior heights.

 

I suspect the Proto2000 models produced by Life-Like followed prototypes for certain time frames. Mather leased these cars and they were reused after leases expired. The cars returned to the Mather shops for repaint and reletter for the new lessee. You will need to consult the ORER for your modeling period to determine where the Mather cars were used.

 

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of mopacfirst
Sent: Tuesday, April 30, 2019 8:00 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Manufacturers Railway Mather box

 

I can see an issue on the height, because from looking at the pictures of car bodies from the Proto kits on eBay, they all look the same even though there were some that were quite a bit taller.  I found another good source in an ad for RY models in O scale, and there the cars are separated by height.  The one I'm thinking of is 7'-8" IH, which seemed to be a common height, but others were as high inside as 10'-3" and the model photos of Proto cars seem to show that they're not.

I found the Hendrickson article from August 2003 and unfortunately there is no table attached, but there the photos also seem to show height differences.

But I thought those were channels (C-sections) on the diagonals, not Z-sections like a "normal" single-sheathed box had.

Ron Merrick

Ron Merrick


this nice shot of the GM&O freight house NKP Boxcar against the freight house

gary laakso
 

The NKP boxcar is the short car against the freight house, fourth from the top.  These pictures are fun to see as they enlarge so easily.

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

 

 

 

Hi List Members,

 

Consider for a moment this nice shot of the GM&O freight house surrounded by steam era freight cars...

 

 

I have a question about how this all works regarding delivery of goods to the customer. Freight cars get parked here, they are unloaded into the freight house by fork lift or hand truck or elbow grease, right? Then what? How does the customer get their goods? Presumably they show up with their company truck (or in earlier days, with their horse-drawn cart) But I don't see any good street access to the building. Is it on the side of the building we cannot see? I'm thinking maybe not, since there are probably tracks there.

 

This is not the first time I've seen freight houses with what appears to be inadequate or non-existent street access. How was this handled? Presumably every inbound carload of items that goes INTO the freight house has to leave as well, and it's not leaving in a freight car, right?

 

Thoughts?

 

Overall, if you omit the large yard in the background, and included only the three tracks in the foreground with the building, a scene like this is very model-genic, and could serve as the focal point of a very nice switching layout or a fun area of activity within a larger layout.

 

Claus Schlund

 

 


Re: this nice shot of the GM&O freight house

Jim Betz
 

  This structure has track on both sides - so I think it is a "transfer house".
  The picture was taken in 1960 - thus the doors of the house are further
apart to accomodate longer cars (50) combined with shorter ones (40).
  Most of the freight moving across this house would have been moved
using fork lifts (1960).
                                                                                          - Jim B.


Re: Manufacturers Railway Mather box

Dennis Storzek
 

On Tue, Apr 30, 2019 at 06:00 AM, mopacfirst wrote:
But I thought those were channels (C-sections) on the diagonals, not Z-sections like a "normal" single-sheathed box had.
Mather was remarkably consistent with the details of their car framing over the years; those channel section diagonals is one of the spotting features. Others were the use of round rod stock for sill steps, and their patented panel roof, which looked for all the world like a series of inverted baking pans.

Dennis Storzek