Date   

Re: Athearn 200 ton crane directions -- help request

Alexander Schneider Jr
 

The reassembled, re-rigged crane is now on my layout and looking very good for its age. Assembly was tricky with directions, and probably impossible without.

 

Alex Schneider

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Alexander Schneider Jr
Sent: Saturday, July 27, 2019 10:43 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Athearn 200 ton crane directions -- help request

 

My thanks to all who offered help. As it happens, my crane appears to be the 1973 model with fewer pulleys on the boom rigging.

 

Alex Schneider

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Benjamin Hom
Sent: Saturday, July 27, 2019 6:51 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Athearn 200 ton crane directions -- help request

 

Al Smith wrote:

"Try this source https://hoseeker.net/athearninstructionscars1950/Athearncrane1952.jpg. If that link doesn't work go to hoseeker.net select literature scroll down to athearn click on athearn  and select freight car instructions1950's scroll down to Crane big hook 1952"

 

Posted a copy on Friday.  See post #165808.

 

 

Ben Hom

 

 

 


Re: Athearn 200 ton crane directions -- help request

Alexander Schneider Jr
 

My thanks to all who offered help. As it happens, my crane appears to be the 1973 model with fewer pulleys on the boom rigging.

 

Alex Schneider

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Benjamin Hom
Sent: Saturday, July 27, 2019 6:51 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Athearn 200 ton crane directions -- help request

 

Al Smith wrote:

"Try this source https://hoseeker.net/athearninstructionscars1950/Athearncrane1952.jpg. If that link doesn't work go to hoseeker.net select literature scroll down to athearn click on athearn  and select freight car instructions1950's scroll down to Crane big hook 1952"

 

Posted a copy on Friday.  See post #165808.

 

 

Ben Hom

 

 

 


Re: 1937 Great Northern AAR Handbrake Wheel

Bill Welch
 

See my message  #157559 for photos. . .

Bill Welch


Re: 1937 Great Northern AAR Handbrake Wheel

Bill Welch
 

That looks very much like one of the three type of brakes wheels Tangent has on the tank car detail sprue, the one with three brake wheel. Brake appears to be square also.

Bill Welch


Re: Athearn 200 ton crane directions -- help request

Benjamin Hom
 

Al Smith wrote:
"Try this source https://hoseeker.net/athearninstructionscars1950/Athearncrane1952.jpg. If that link doesn't work go to hoseeker.net select literature scroll down to athearn click on athearn  and select freight car instructions1950's scroll down to Crane big hook 1952"

Posted a copy on Friday.  See post #165808.


Ben Hom




Re: Athearn 200 ton crane directions -- help request

Allan Smith
 


Try this source https://hoseeker.net/athearninstructionscars1950/Athearncrane1952.jpg. If that link doesn't work go to hoseeker.net select literature scroll down to athearn click on athearn  and select freight car instructions1950's scroll down to Crane big hook 1952
Al Smith
Sonora CA

On ‎Saturday‎, ‎July‎ ‎27‎, ‎2019‎ ‎04‎:‎23‎:‎16‎ ‎PM‎ ‎PDT, Jon Miller <atsfus@...> wrote:


    Remember Athearn produced two versions of the crane.  The first was zamac and had 3 pulleys for boom and main hook.  The later version was plastic and had 1 pulleys  in place of the three.
-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
SPROG User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: Athearn 200 ton crane directions -- help request

Jon Miller
 

    Remember Athearn produced two versions of the crane.  The first was zamac and had 3 pulleys for boom and main hook.  The later version was plastic and had 1 pulleys  in place of the three.
-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
SPROG User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: Athearn 200 ton crane directions -- help request

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Friends,

Attached are two photos of WP 37, as steam and as diesel, plus two of the SP's Roseville wrecker (the whole train was painted in faux-Daylight colors). The B&W shot of 37 is from my collection, the color view is my own and dates from the late 1970s, and the SP crane shots are also my work and date to around around 2005.
Perhaps they will help with the rigging questions. Otherwise, please enjoy them.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff



Re: 1932 AAR book for sale

Scott H. Haycock
 

The Book has been sold.

Scott Haycock


Re: Athearn 200 ton crane directions -- help request

fire5506
 
Edited

Here are a few things that may help you figure out the rigging.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Athearn-1702-HO-200-ton-Crane-SF-/293100168968?_trksid=p2385738.m4383.l4275.c10
 Look at the pictures on the ebay ad. Down load them for reference.

Also some steam info to help figuring the rigging.

The cable to the boom, both ends go to the drum. On the 2 hooks one end goes to the drum and the other end attaches to the boom for the auxiliary hook and on the main hook it attaches on the hook. See the pictures.

The PDF is the Tichy instructions and the last page shows the boom cable routing on it. 

Richard Webster


Re: Athearn 200 ton crane directions -- help request

fire5506
 

I have not built the Athearn 200 ton crane. The Brown hoist 150 ton steam crane I fired on had the boom cables on the top drum, the auxiliary hook on the center hook and the main hook on the bottom drum.

Richard Webster


Re: 1937 Great Northern AAR Handbrake Wheel

Gene Deimling
 

The drawing I have shows it as a Universal.

Gene Deimling


1932 AAR book for sale

Scott H. Haycock
 

I have a copy of Ted's 1932 AAR Box Car book for sale. This book was published in 2004, and is in excellent condition.

I'll let it go for $55.00 shipped via media mail to the lower 48. 

Pleas contact me OFF LIST.

Scott Haycock 


Re: ARA 1932 Matches for Atlas Body Styles

Scott H. Haycock
 

If anyone is interested, I have a copy of Ted's 1932 ARA Box Car Book, published in 2004. This book is in excellent condition and I will sell it for $55.00 shipped via media mail to the lower 48. Contact me Off List.


Scott Haycock


1937 Great Northern AAR Handbrake Wheel

radiodial868
 

Any thoughts as to manufacturer of this Brake Wheel?  I built this Sunshine 40' "T&G sided AAR style Great Northern" kit in the original order vertical shaft handbrake configuration, but the included wheels look nothing like this so was going to see what else was out there. Figured a name was a good place to start.
RJ Dial
Burlingame, Ca


Re: Athearn 200 ton crane directions -- help request

Benjamin Hom
 

Alex Schneider asked:
"I am trying to reassemble this model, and it's not obvious how the large hook, small hook and boom are connected with string to the three [capstans] inside the body. If anyone has a set of assembly directions showing the correct routing I would appreciate it very much.

Courtesy of HO Seeker (https://www.hoseeker.net).


Ben Hom


Athearn 200 ton crane directions -- help request

Alexander Schneider Jr
 

I am trying to reassemble this model, and it's not obvious how the large hook, small hook and boom are connected with string to the three capstains inside the body. If anyone has a set of assembly directions showing the correct routing I would appreciate it very much.

Thanks.

Alex Schneider


Re: Sources for machinist/watchmaker-quality small twist drills redux

Richard Townsend
 

Long ago, Ben King had an article in MR on building a drill sharpener. He was the designer and builder of a miniature precision drill press that was the forerunner of the Brazleton drill presses. He also published an MR article on that. His work was masterful.


On Jul 25, 2019, at 10:29 AM, Daniel A. Mitchell <danmitch@...> wrote:

I’ve not found a source that’s 100%, but generally drills purchased from a machinist’s supply will be much better than those from the usual hobby shop. That’s true whether the drills are imported or domestic. True that domestic drills are usually better, but I’ve still had good luck with many imports. The biggest problem with machinist’s drills is usually not sharpness, but some are overly hard and break easily (much like carbide).

Machinist’s sources include:  MSC, Wholesale Tool, Traverse Tool, Grizzly, Little Machine Shop, etc.

The use of Jeweler’s Pivot drills has also been suggested. These are often good, but are usually flat “spade” drills and not at all suitable for drilling deep holes.  The meaning or “deep hole” is any hole more than six or so times the depth of its diameter. In the model RR uses for drilling grab-iron holes and such, about 98% of the holes need to be “deep” …usually “through” holes. The lack of helical flutes on pivot drills means they can’t lift the chips out of the hole, so have to be withdrawn to clear the hole frequently.

There are also “instrument” drills … be prepared to spend $$$ …. Like $50 per drill. Many of these are also spade drills. Search for “micro-drills”. One source used to be Louis Levin and Son, Inc, but apparently they no longer sell the drill bits … just the drill presses and lathes to use them.

Thus we’re back to paragraph one, using “Machinist’s Drills”. I buy them in packs of ten or a dozen, They’re cheaper, and even the imports are almost always much better than “hobby shop drills”.

P.S. These little drills CAN be resharpened. You need to use a strong magnifier, good light, and a fine sharpening stone. You also need to know what a properly sharpened drill LOOKS like. Such resharpening does not produce a truly correct tip shape, more like the tip of the spade bits, but is quite adequate for most hobby uses. 

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Jul 24, 2019, at 4:39 PM, Denny Anspach <danspachmd@...> wrote:

My most hateful modeling chore is locating and drilling for grabs and handrails, etc. I machine drill when i can with carbide drills, but practically,  most have to be done by hand; and I am totally frustrated by the sheer plethora of dull #78-80 twist drills that seem to be endlessly supplied to us by almost all usual hobby vendors. This morning, after a failure to adequately be able to hand drill through some tough plastic (#79), I tossed the errant drill in favor of a new one, also from a popular hobby supplier.  The new one could not cut butter either, and in the attempt to do so actually  bent over (did..not..break!) at a right angle like bending a wire!  Now, I do have a large supply of sharp (and brittle) carbide tip drills, but they are too risky to use with hand drilling- as you all already know.

So....where do you all find high quality reliably sharp tiny twist drills, most favorably from American, German, Swiss, or Japanese origins?

Denny 


Re: RI 141000 - 142000 single sheathed XM

mopacfirst
 

OK, thanks, I'll stick with the roman lettering and add some paint-out reweigh data.

Now to repaint some IM and Kadee steel boxcars in the 1958 scheme.  I have both Microscale and Musk Island decals to work from.

Ron Merrick


Re: Sources for machinist/watchmaker-quality small twist drills redux

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

I’ve not found a source that’s 100%, but generally drills purchased from a machinist’s supply will be much better than those from the usual hobby shop. That’s true whether the drills are imported or domestic. True that domestic drills are usually better, but I’ve still had good luck with many imports. The biggest problem with machinist’s drills is usually not sharpness, but some are overly hard and break easily (much like carbide).

Machinist’s sources include:  MSC, Wholesale Tool, Traverse Tool, Grizzly, Little Machine Shop, etc.

The use of Jeweler’s Pivot drills has also been suggested. These are often good, but are usually flat “spade” drills and not at all suitable for drilling deep holes.  The meaning or “deep hole” is any hole more than six or so times the depth of its diameter. In the model RR uses for drilling grab-iron holes and such, about 98% of the holes need to be “deep” …usually “through” holes. The lack of helical flutes on pivot drills means they can’t lift the chips out of the hole, so have to be withdrawn to clear the hole frequently.

There are also “instrument” drills … be prepared to spend $$$ …. Like $50 per drill. Many of these are also spade drills. Search for “micro-drills”. One source used to be Louis Levin and Son, Inc, but apparently they no longer sell the drill bits … just the drill presses and lathes to use them.

Thus we’re back to paragraph one, using “Machinist’s Drills”. I buy them in packs of ten or a dozen, They’re cheaper, and even the imports are almost always much better than “hobby shop drills”.

P.S. These little drills CAN be resharpened. You need to use a strong magnifier, good light, and a fine sharpening stone. You also need to know what a properly sharpened drill LOOKS like. Such resharpening does not produce a truly correct tip shape, more like the tip of the spade bits, but is quite adequate for most hobby uses. 

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Jul 24, 2019, at 4:39 PM, Denny Anspach <danspachmd@...> wrote:

My most hateful modeling chore is locating and drilling for grabs and handrails, etc. I machine drill when i can with carbide drills, but practically,  most have to be done by hand; and I am totally frustrated by the sheer plethora of dull #78-80 twist drills that seem to be endlessly supplied to us by almost all usual hobby vendors. This morning, after a failure to adequately be able to hand drill through some tough plastic (#79), I tossed the errant drill in favor of a new one, also from a popular hobby supplier.  The new one could not cut butter either, and in the attempt to do so actually  bent over (did..not..break!) at a right angle like bending a wire!  Now, I do have a large supply of sharp (and brittle) carbide tip drills, but they are too risky to use with hand drilling- as you all already know.

So....where do you all find high quality reliably sharp tiny twist drills, most favorably from American, German, Swiss, or Japanese origins?

Denny