Date   
Re: Throwback Tuesday: The Lindberg Line

Charlie Vlk
 

I had similar experiences at the Illinois Tech Model Railroad Club c. 1964-5 when the Lindberg trucks first came out.   There were few places on the club layout that a car equipped with them would “stay”…compared to the MDC, Athearn, Varney, etc. trucks that most of us had they were fantastic!

Not a freight car, but I had a AHM Pullman equipped with Con-Cor metal wheelsets….once the brake shoes were ground down to clear the proper 36” wheels the car was about as slippery as a freight car with the Lindbergs.

Charlie Vlk

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Larry Smith
Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2019 5:14 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Tuesday: The Lindberg Line

 

When they first came out, back in the early 1960s, I was a member of the model railroad club at the Air Force base in Rantoul, IL.  I bought and assembled the early version of the Con-Cor air slide hopper.  The inside of this car was solid metal with plastic sides.  The car was so heavy that the only trucks that would roll under it was the Lindberg trucks.  I remeber one siding we had that ran down a long grade into a lumber yard and we cut the car off at the siding.  It got away from us and rolled all the way down the siding and ended up on top of the track bumper.  Those were the days

 

Larry Smith

 

On Tuesday, February 26, 2019, 12:38:34 PM CST, Clark Propst <cepropst@q.com> wrote:

 

 

I believe the Lindberg trucks are still available. Didn't they came in Ribside Cars kits? I threw them out anyway...Were the Mantua 'Heavies' Lindberg cars?
C W Propst

Re: Throwback Tuesday: The Lindberg Line

Larry Smith
 

When they first came out, back in the early 1960s, I was a member of the model railroad club at the Air Force base in Rantoul, IL.  I bought and assembled the early version of the Con-Cor air slide hopper.  The inside of this car was solid metal with plastic sides.  The car was so heavy that the only trucks that would roll under it was the Lindberg trucks.  I remeber one siding we had that ran down a long grade into a lumber yard and we cut the car off at the siding.  It got away from us and rolled all the way down the siding and ended up on top of the track bumper.  Those were the days

Larry Smith

On Tuesday, February 26, 2019, 12:38:34 PM CST, Clark Propst <cepropst@q.com> wrote:


I believe the Lindberg trucks are still available. Didn't they came in Ribside Cars kits? I threw them out anyway...Were the Mantua 'Heavies' Lindberg cars?
C W Propst

Re: Throwback Tuesday: The Lindberg Line

Charlie Vlk
 

Most of the American Flyer HO was original tooling….not to say that the F3s were not Marx bodies.

The Model Power / Marx “F2” was a copy of the Varney tooling but IIRC there were additional crudities that brought them (down)  to another level….

The prewar American Flyer cars were cast metal.  The New Haven Baggage RPO still looks good today even if a little heavy in rivet sizes.  The “American Flyer” coach was short but fairly well proportioned with a few windows deleted.  They had a cupola caboose different than the postwar Reading NE and a nice composite gondola.  Some of the other cars may have transitioned to injected molded plastic versions.

Charlie Vlk

 

 

Friends,

I've occasionally seen the Lindberg switcher at train shows, and scored one of the rather oversized cabooses to get the end platforms/steps (parts still in my stock), but have never seen any of the other freight cars. Has anyone ever run across these? Were they ever re-issued by somebody else? The stock car looks like it might have conversion possibilities.

I think I still have at least one pair of the Lindberg trucks floating around someplace. They were among the best rolling trucks of their era.

Now here's something to ponder. A.C. Gilbert of American Flyer fame also tried their hands at HO. Most of their stuff was the same tooling as Marx (and  IIRC is still available from Model Power). Most Gilbert was really low-quality junk, but when I was a youngster I had two Gilbert 50' fishbelly flat cars that were quite different. Except for the trucks and horn couplers, these were one-piece cast metal and had some pretty good detail, plus enough weight to keep them on the track. I keep an eye out for these at train shows, and may be tempted if I ever run across any again. They might be worth upgrading.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 2/26/19 7:08 AM, Benjamin Hom wrote:

Lindberg ad, Model Railroader, December 1962.

 

 

Ben Hom

 

Re: Throwback Tuesday: The Lindberg Line

Charlie Vlk
 

I believe that Mantua got the Lindberg line so now that it has morphed through Model Power and MRC to Lionel we will have to await yet another attempt at releasing dated tooling to see them again.  Maybe the Marx tooling they also got with the Model Power acquisition will be a higher priority…after all, they at least had a searchlight car!!!

Seriously, Mantua and Model Power did run the Lindberg tooling so some of the cars might be available….not sure if that is what they used for the “Heavies” line of diecast metal cars…just to prevent any kitbashing!!!

Charlie Vlk

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of william darnaby
Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2019 2:08 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Tuesday: The Lindberg Line

 

The reefer has short doors like a meat reefer.  Some 30 or more years ago I picked up 4 or 5 at a swap and did some simple upgrades…consistent with my limited knowledge at the time…and turned them into Armour (TRAX) cars.  They would be considered stand-ins, I’m sure, by todays standards but they are still in regular use in my sessions.

 

Bill

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Garth Groff
Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2019 12:03 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Tuesday: The Lindberg Line

 

Friends,

I've occasionally seen the Lindberg switcher at train shows, and scored one of the rather oversized cabooses to get the end platforms/steps (parts still in my stock), but have never seen any of the other freight cars. Has anyone ever run across these? Were they ever re-issued by somebody else? The stock car looks like it might have conversion possibilities.

I think I still have at least one pair of the Lindberg trucks floating around someplace. They were among the best rolling trucks of their era.

Now here's something to ponder. A.C. Gilbert of American Flyer fame also tried their hands at HO. Most of their stuff was the same tooling as Marx (and  IIRC is still available from Model Power). Most Gilbert was really low-quality junk, but when I was a youngster I had two Gilbert 50' fishbelly flat cars that were quite different. Except for the trucks and horn couplers, these were one-piece cast metal and had some pretty good detail, plus enough weight to keep them on the track. I keep an eye out for these at train shows, and may be tempted if I ever run across any again. They might be worth upgrading.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 2/26/19 7:08 AM, Benjamin Hom wrote:

Lindberg ad, Model Railroader, December 1962.

 

 

Ben Hom

 

Re: Palace Poultry Car Color

Douglas Harding
 

Here is a screen capture from Kristen’s PowerPoint, which shows several variations in Poultry Car paint schemes.

The two Poultry Palace cars show a light colored body, one has dark entry and ends, the other has light entry and ends.

 

Like Kristen, I have nothing beyond the John White quote about color.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jake Schaible
Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2019 9:41 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Palace Poultry Car Color

 

As you may know, no PPKX car is known to survive.  So there is a bit of debate on the exact color.  (The sole cackle car existent is a Live Poultry Transport type at the StL MoT.)   

B&W images of PPKX cars (for example, google "PPKX 5065") show the scheme, but I'm not aware of any contemporaneous primary source that details the specific paint used on these cars.  "Home to Roost: The Story of Live Poultry Transit by Rail", by John H. White, Jr. (https://www.jstor.org/stable/3743735) mentions in passing the poultry cars being "yellow" but is unclear who's cars he was talking about and this comes after a passage about the LPT.  

So this may be a case where the best evidence may be old models.  

Ambroid introduced it's shake box kit of the PPKX car "Speedy" in 1961 and apprentice details that the "color scheme was white body, green ends, roof and doors, and black underframe." The car is reviewed in the September, 1961 issue of Model Railroader in the Trade Topics column (p 14) which added the lettering was also green for over the door, and white for the black side of the exposed underframe.  This car was later sold by Northeastern as kit #HS-4.  Some images on line suggest the modeler went with a kelly green, but I think this might be a mistake.  Remember these cars were often placed on express trains, so I have long had a hunch they were more an olive / harriman green to match the train.  

Having said that, I'm aware of an image at CSRM of a PPKX car (https://calisphere.org/item/044134bd1c9508696497bdda52a5359b/) where I would be hard pressed to prove the body was painted anything other than a single color, but does seem to confirm the lettering over the door is darker than the side and the lettering on the side frame is lighter.  

Sorry I could not be more helpful.  

Cheers,

Jake Schaible

 

 

Re: Throwback Tuesday: The Lindberg Line

Lester Breuer
 

Garth I am attaching photos of Lindberg stock car, kit T181, purchased in March 1975 for $1.75.  It has been in service on my railroad, the Minneapolis & Northland Railroad Company since March 1975.  I have in my notes dimensions of the car are like the Milwaukee stock car.  Photo of MILW car in RMC July 1991.
Lester Breuer

Re: 2018 Chicagoland RPM Mini-Kit

gtws00
 

Thanks for all the kind comments.
I built two underframes for this car. One using the  recommended Tichy part and the Scratchbuilt one as seen here.
I hope to present a clinic on its construction showing both underframes as an option at this years 2019 Chicagoland RPM
This was another fun car to bash together

George Toman

Re: 2018 Chicagoland RPM Mini-Kit

gtws00
 

The Rivets on the Centersill are Resin Rivets from the MicroMark. I used these as they are a bit larger than the ones I had from Archer.
https://www.micromark.com/HO-scale-decals-with-raised-3D-rivets-and-other-surface-details

George Toman

Re: 2018 Chicagoland RPM Mini-Kit

gtws00
 

The Ice Hatches are from Plano part#12079 and listed as a new item. 
http://www.planomodelproducts.com/photos/12079.jpg

George Toman

Re: 2018 Chicagoland RPM Mini-Kit

vapeurchapelon
 

Extremely nice! Very well done! The rivet lines on the center sill are hand-made?
 
Johannes
 
Gesendet: Dienstag, 26. Februar 2019 um 15:40 Uhr
Von: "gtws00 via Groups.Io" <gtws00@...>
An: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Betreff: [RealSTMFC] 2018 Chicagoland RPM Mini-Kit
I have finished my FGEX Reefer to a point that it is ready for paint. Building was a bit different than I am use to with those trussrods. Attached are a couple photos
George Toman

Re: Throwback Tuesday: The Lindberg Line

william darnaby
 

The reefer has short doors like a meat reefer.  Some 30 or more years ago I picked up 4 or 5 at a swap and did some simple upgrades…consistent with my limited knowledge at the time…and turned them into Armour (TRAX) cars.  They would be considered stand-ins, I’m sure, by todays standards but they are still in regular use in my sessions.

 

Bill

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Garth Groff
Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2019 12:03 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Tuesday: The Lindberg Line

 

Friends,

I've occasionally seen the Lindberg switcher at train shows, and scored one of the rather oversized cabooses to get the end platforms/steps (parts still in my stock), but have never seen any of the other freight cars. Has anyone ever run across these? Were they ever re-issued by somebody else? The stock car looks like it might have conversion possibilities.

I think I still have at least one pair of the Lindberg trucks floating around someplace. They were among the best rolling trucks of their era.

Now here's something to ponder. A.C. Gilbert of American Flyer fame also tried their hands at HO. Most of their stuff was the same tooling as Marx (and  IIRC is still available from Model Power). Most Gilbert was really low-quality junk, but when I was a youngster I had two Gilbert 50' fishbelly flat cars that were quite different. Except for the trucks and horn couplers, these were one-piece cast metal and had some pretty good detail, plus enough weight to keep them on the track. I keep an eye out for these at train shows, and may be tempted if I ever run across any again. They might be worth upgrading.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 2/26/19 7:08 AM, Benjamin Hom wrote:

Lindberg ad, Model Railroader, December 1962.

 

 

Ben Hom

 

Re: Throwback Tuesday: 1935 H. Owen ATSF Ra-9 Reefer (1935, and Varney ATSF Bx-12 Boxcar (1936).

Denny Anspach
 

Probably the very first American HO freight car kits (perhaps freight OR passenger) were those first advertised in 1935 by the late Howell Day under the name of H. Owen.  They were balsa blocks with silk screened paste or Bristol board sides.  

The very first HO kit that Gordon Varney produced was a line of wood frame boxcars and reefers, also with pasteboard and or Bristol board printed sides, the boxcars famously as printed rotograveure photographs (he stuck his head and camera out the window and recorded passing frieight cars that appealed to him).  

Attached below are photos of models of each in my inventory.

The H. Owen model from 1935 is of unknown date of build. It has much later -but also early- styrene Bettendorf T trucks and KD couplers.  It is very neatly built. Note that the ladders are printed on. 

The Varney box car model was actually built the year of production, 1936 by Boynton Green who was a young engineering faculty member at Stanford U at the time.  The sprung trucks are one of Dr. Green’s creations, wrought from Varney's cast lead trucks that were first produced either then or in the years soon after up to WWII. The ladders were punched brass.  Part of the running board is an aftermarket repair. Note that the sides depict even the shadows of the original photos.  One cannot argue prototype inaccuracies when the sides are direct photos! 

The H. Owen model was a serendipitous find in a flea market scrap box; the Varney model was a present to me by now Professor Dr. Green in the early 1950s.  I have other rolling stock of his, including a correspondence that he had with Al Kalmbach in the earliest Model Railroaders. 

I love these old car modelss, and immensely respect the fine modelers of the time who built them. I occasionally will salt a long string of fine prototype freight cars with one or more of these ancient models, and somehow, they seem to blend right in.  

Denny

 

      
Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento CA 



Re: Which is it?

Tim O'Connor
 

The name changed from General Steel Castings Corporation to General Steel Industries Corporation
between 1953 and 1961 but I don't know the exact date.

Originally called Commonwealth. Alco and Baldwin incorporated GSC in 1928 and acquired Commonwealth
in 1929. So from 1929 to 1961 (or thereabouts) it was called GSC.

Tim

On 2/26/2019 1:34 PM, Clark Propst wrote:
According to the magazine write up the company became GSI in 61 I believe? But, I think that was in the write up that called it General Steel Car...
Clark W Propst
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*

Re: Palace Poultry Car Color

Jake Schaible
 

By the way to clarify the "Mudd" above, names over the doors for the most part does not connote a lessee, but is actually the name given to the car.  There are a few exceptions to this, including a car LPTC 683 named "Goyert & Vogel", an image of which can be seen in Kristin's excellent presentation.  Her presentation also shows an image of Mudd as LPTX 666 as well as enough images to suggest there was considerable variation in even the PPKX & LPTC car paint schemes.    

Re: Throwback Tuesday: The Lindberg Line

Richard Townsend
 

The stock car is good for a Milwaukee Road stock car. There was an article in Mainline Modeler years ago about that. The gondola is a good model of an Erie car. Both are available now from Mantua, I think.


Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Tue, Feb 26, 2019 10:03 am
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Tuesday: The Lindberg Line

Friends,

I've occasionally seen the Lindberg switcher at train shows, and scored one of the rather oversized cabooses to get the end platforms/steps (parts still in my stock), but have never seen any of the other freight cars. Has anyone ever run across these? Were they ever re-issued by somebody else? The stock car looks like it might have conversion possibilities.

I think I still have at least one pair of the Lindberg trucks floating around someplace. They were among the best rolling trucks of their era.

Now here's something to ponder. A.C. Gilbert of American Flyer fame also tried their hands at HO. Most of their stuff was the same tooling as Marx (and  IIRC is still available from Model Power). Most Gilbert was really low-quality junk, but when I was a youngster I had two Gilbert 50' fishbelly flat cars that were quite different. Except for the trucks and horn couplers, these were one-piece cast metal and had some pretty good detail, plus enough weight to keep them on the track. I keep an eye out for these at train shows, and may be tempted if I ever run across any again. They might be worth upgrading.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 2/26/19 7:08 AM, Benjamin Hom wrote:
Lindberg ad, Model Railroader, December 1962.


Ben Hom

Re: Throwback Tuesday: The Lindberg Line

Clark Propst
 

I believe the Lindberg trucks are still available. Didn't they came in Ribside Cars kits? I threw them out anyway...Were the Mantua 'Heavies' Lindberg cars?
C W Propst

Re: Which is it?

Clark Propst
 

According to the magazine write up the company became GSI in 61 I believe? But, I think that was in the write up that called it General Steel Car...
Clark W Propst

Re: Throwback Tuesday: The Lindberg Line

Tim O'Connor
 


I had the Lindberg stock car, flat car and gondola when I was a teenager. I agree the stock car
probably is the most useful as kitbash fodder. I -think- I had the switcher - I seem to recall it had
a drive line through the fuel tank that connected the trucks. (Overland did the same thing on its
early brass models.) Does that ring a bell?

Tim O'



On 2/26/2019 1:03 PM, Garth Groff wrote:
Friends,

I've occasionally seen the Lindberg switcher at train shows, and scored one of the rather oversized cabooses to get the end platforms/steps (parts still in my stock), but have never seen any of the other freight cars. Has anyone ever run across these? Were they ever re-issued by somebody else? The stock car looks like it might have conversion possibilities.

I think I still have at least one pair of the Lindberg trucks floating around someplace. They were among the best rolling trucks of their era.

Now here's something to ponder. A.C. Gilbert of American Flyer fame also tried their hands at HO. Most of their stuff was the same tooling as Marx (and  IIRC is still available from Model Power). Most Gilbert was really low-quality junk, but when I was a youngster I had two Gilbert 50' fishbelly flat cars that were quite different. Except for the trucks and horn couplers, these were one-piece cast metal and had some pretty good detail, plus enough weight to keep them on the track. I keep an eye out for these at train shows, and may be tempted if I ever run across any again. They might be worth upgrading.


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

Re: Throwback Tuesday: The Lindberg Line

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Friends,

I've occasionally seen the Lindberg switcher at train shows, and scored one of the rather oversized cabooses to get the end platforms/steps (parts still in my stock), but have never seen any of the other freight cars. Has anyone ever run across these? Were they ever re-issued by somebody else? The stock car looks like it might have conversion possibilities.

I think I still have at least one pair of the Lindberg trucks floating around someplace. They were among the best rolling trucks of their era.

Now here's something to ponder. A.C. Gilbert of American Flyer fame also tried their hands at HO. Most of their stuff was the same tooling as Marx (and  IIRC is still available from Model Power). Most Gilbert was really low-quality junk, but when I was a youngster I had two Gilbert 50' fishbelly flat cars that were quite different. Except for the trucks and horn couplers, these were one-piece cast metal and had some pretty good detail, plus enough weight to keep them on the track. I keep an eye out for these at train shows, and may be tempted if I ever run across any again. They might be worth upgrading.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 2/26/19 7:08 AM, Benjamin Hom wrote:
Lindberg ad, Model Railroader, December 1962.


Ben Hom

Re: Which is it?

Tony Thompson
 

Clark Propst wrote:

At ops last night a friend pointed out a discrepancy in name definition. Both Exactrail and Tangent have come out with GSC flat cars. One calls the company General Steel Car and the other called it General Steel Casting. We're curious as to which is correcter?

    General Steel Casting.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history