Date   

Re: Painting brass

 

In my case, I have to set the oven to 170ºF, because it won’t go any lower. So when it hits 150ºF, I’d put the model in and turn it off.

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Mont Switzer <MSwitzer@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Saturday, April 18, 2020 at 2:39 PM
To: "main@RealSTMFC.groups.io" <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Painting brass

 

Many years ago I learned a hard lesson about baking brass models.  In conjunction with that lesson I also got to learn how to re-assemble some brass models.  After that I still used Mrs. Switzer's oven, but I went about it differently.  I now use the following steps:

 

1. preheat the oven to 150 degrees (I'm not disagreeing with 185 degrees)

2. when the light indicates the oven is at 150 degrees (pre-heat completed) turn it off

3. insert models

4. allow oven to cool and remove models 

 

The bad experience I had may have been a defect in the oven, but I'm not going to find out a second time.  I had placed the models in the oven and set it to pre-heat to 150 degrees.  It appears that during the pre-heating process the oven went well above 150 to bring the oven to the desired temperature.  That temperature was high enough to melt solder.

 

Mont Switzer


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] on behalf of bob.stetser@... [bob.stetser@...]
Sent: Saturday, April 11, 2020 7:29 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Painting brass

Soak in lacquer thinner for a couple of hours to remove whatever is on the model.

Run twice in the ultrasonic cleaner, let dry

Spray, from rattle can, Rust-Oleum Primer, SELF ETCHING PRIMER, let dry

Spray with airbrush color of choice.

Bake 1 hour in oven at 185 degrees, leave in oven until cool.


Re: Painting brass

Mont Switzer
 

Many years ago I learned a hard lesson about baking brass models.  In conjunction with that lesson I also got to learn how to re-assemble some brass models.  After that I still used Mrs. Switzer's oven, but I went about it differently.  I now use the following steps:

1. preheat the oven to 150 degrees (I'm not disagreeing with 185 degrees)
2. when the light indicates the oven is at 150 degrees (pre-heat completed) turn it off
3. insert models
4. allow oven to cool and remove models 

The bad experience I had may have been a defect in the oven, but I'm not going to find out a second time.  I had placed the models in the oven and set it to pre-heat to 150 degrees.  It appears that during the pre-heating process the oven went well above 150 to bring the oven to the desired temperature.  That temperature was high enough to melt solder.

Mont Switzer


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] on behalf of bob.stetser@... [bob.stetser@...]
Sent: Saturday, April 11, 2020 7:29 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Painting brass

Soak in lacquer thinner for a couple of hours to remove whatever is on the model.

Run twice in the ultrasonic cleaner, let dry

Spray, from rattle can, Rust-Oleum Primer, SELF ETCHING PRIMER, let dry

Spray with airbrush color of choice.

Bake 1 hour in oven at 185 degrees, leave in oven until cool.


Re: FARMALL TRACTOR DECALS

Lloyd Keyser
 

Thanks Eric for the info. Lloyd Keyser

On Sat, Apr 18, 2020 at 2:10 PM Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:
A list of Jerry Hamsmith’s current kit and decal offerings is linked to the Helpful Links page on the Resin Car Works blog. 


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

On Apr 18, 2020, at 1:31 PM, Nelson Moyer <npmoyer@...> wrote:

Doug provided the history for the WCFN, but if you’re interested in the flat car, it’s very similar to the CB&Q FM-11/11A flat cars built between 1928 and 1930, and they too rode on Andrews trucks. The major difference is length, as the WCFN car is probably 40 ft. or 42 ft. and the CB&Q car was 45 ft. The only visible difference other than length is the FM-11 has 13 stake pockets per side and the WCFN car has 12 stake pockets. The Q cars ran into the 1970s with many converted to TOFC service. A few FM-11As were converted to push plow service by installing a wedge blade on one end and building a box on the deck to hold boulders for ballast. A resin kit is available from Jerry Hamsmith with CB&Q decals. It’s a very well designed kit and relatively easy to build.

 

Nelson Moyer                                                                                           

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Lloyd Keyser
Sent: Saturday, April 18, 2020 11:23 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] FARMALL TRACTOR DECALS

 

I would like to know more about that flat car. It appears to be on Andrews trucks

Lloyd Keyser

 

On Sat, Apr 18, 2020 at 7:57 AM Nelson Moyer <npmoyer@...> wrote:

Sounds like the best way to way to go is to check the business listings in phone books for the year you model in the towns you model and see what you find. Another resource here in Iowa is centennial books – many towns and counties issued them in conjunction with their centennial.  While finding centennial books in public libraries has been easy, finding period phone books has been challenging.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Friday, April 17, 2020 11:41 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] FARMALL TRACTOR DECALS

 

On Fri, Apr 17, 2020 at 11:58 AM, Nelson Moyer wrote:

With all this talk of tractor loads, I'm wondering if there were regional followings for either Farmall red or John Deere green. I remember seeing mostly red in Indiana in the 1940 and 1950 on visits to the grandparent's farm. With plants in Moline and Waterloo, would John Deere be more prevalent in Iowa than Farmall?

Jim Ogden touched on this but let me add, it's more granular than that. It didn't really matter where the factory was - the factory could ship nationwide - that's why we see photos of tractors on flatcars. What really mattered is where their distributors were. You're not going to see a flatcar load of green tractors spotted at the team track ramp of a town with only an IH distributorship. That would be red tractor territory. Farmers tended to buy what they could easily get serviced. No sense buying a tractor from a dealer two towns over unless the price was really good. The overlap between territories has of course expanded as highways have gotten better, but that regionallity does still exist. Case in point, when I used to drive US 20 out to Freeport every six weeks or so, I'd pass a New Holland dealer about halfway between Rockford and Freeport. That area is the only place I ever recall seeing New Holland equipment working the fields.

Dennis Storzek

 


Monon 3-bay hopper cars

Mont Switzer
 

John,

The Monon had 100 of them, built by GATX in the late 1940's.  I believe as built the trucks were black.  Generally, when repainting freight cars the Monon did not repaint the trucks.  They were steam cleaned and inspected, but that was it.  

Mont Switzer 


Re: B&M XM1 trucks

Schleigh Mike
 

Hi Mark & Group----

Compare these trucks to those under the B&M 71000 series cars and you will find them different.  They may comply with the Pennsy's specifications but they do not look like the ARA Type Y.  I believe the Red Caboose does this best.  Others may feel otherwise.

Kind wishes from Grove City, Penna.----Mike Schleigh

On Saturday, April 18, 2020, 03:13:04 PM EDT, Mark Rossiter <mrossiter327@...> wrote:


Doesn't Bowser and Kadee also offer 2D-F8 trucks?

Mark 


Re: B&M XM1 trucks

Benjamin Hom
 

Mark Rossiter asked:
"Doesn't Bowser and Kadee also offer 2D-F8 trucks?"

They do, and I prefer the Bowser trucks for most applications, but the Red Caboose truck models an earlier bolster design that more closely matches the trucks on this prototype.


Ben Hom


Re: B&M XM1 trucks

Mark Rossiter
 

Doesn't Bowser and Kadee also offer 2D-F8 trucks?

Mark 


Re: Barriger Library AC&F Photos

Ray Breyer
 

There's one GOOD way to search: download everything, save it, rename it logically, and then search to your heart's content!

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL


On Saturday, April 18, 2020, 11:38:29 AM CDT, Dave Parker via groups.io <spottab@...> wrote:


On Sat, Apr 18, 2020 at 08:54 AM, Thomas Evans wrote:
Does anyone know if there is a way to search or limit by type, railroad, year or anything?
The short answer is no, the search capabilities here are almost nonexistent.

The one exception is that you can (usually?) search the ACF photos by lot number.  For example, the first photo in David's post can be found by searching with "ACF 2521".  It's great if you know the lot number, but otherwise...
 
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: FARMALL TRACTOR DECALS

Eric Hansmann
 

A list of Jerry Hamsmith’s current kit and decal offerings is linked to the Helpful Links page on the Resin Car Works blog. 


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

On Apr 18, 2020, at 1:31 PM, Nelson Moyer <npmoyer@...> wrote:

Doug provided the history for the WCFN, but if you’re interested in the flat car, it’s very similar to the CB&Q FM-11/11A flat cars built between 1928 and 1930, and they too rode on Andrews trucks. The major difference is length, as the WCFN car is probably 40 ft. or 42 ft. and the CB&Q car was 45 ft. The only visible difference other than length is the FM-11 has 13 stake pockets per side and the WCFN car has 12 stake pockets. The Q cars ran into the 1970s with many converted to TOFC service. A few FM-11As were converted to push plow service by installing a wedge blade on one end and building a box on the deck to hold boulders for ballast. A resin kit is available from Jerry Hamsmith with CB&Q decals. It’s a very well designed kit and relatively easy to build.

 

Nelson Moyer                                                                                           

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Lloyd Keyser
Sent: Saturday, April 18, 2020 11:23 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] FARMALL TRACTOR DECALS

 

I would like to know more about that flat car. It appears to be on Andrews trucks

Lloyd Keyser

 

On Sat, Apr 18, 2020 at 7:57 AM Nelson Moyer <npmoyer@...> wrote:

Sounds like the best way to way to go is to check the business listings in phone books for the year you model in the towns you model and see what you find. Another resource here in Iowa is centennial books – many towns and counties issued them in conjunction with their centennial.  While finding centennial books in public libraries has been easy, finding period phone books has been challenging.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Friday, April 17, 2020 11:41 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] FARMALL TRACTOR DECALS

 

On Fri, Apr 17, 2020 at 11:58 AM, Nelson Moyer wrote:

With all this talk of tractor loads, I'm wondering if there were regional followings for either Farmall red or John Deere green. I remember seeing mostly red in Indiana in the 1940 and 1950 on visits to the grandparent's farm. With plants in Moline and Waterloo, would John Deere be more prevalent in Iowa than Farmall?

Jim Ogden touched on this but let me add, it's more granular than that. It didn't really matter where the factory was - the factory could ship nationwide - that's why we see photos of tractors on flatcars. What really mattered is where their distributors were. You're not going to see a flatcar load of green tractors spotted at the team track ramp of a town with only an IH distributorship. That would be red tractor territory. Farmers tended to buy what they could easily get serviced. No sense buying a tractor from a dealer two towns over unless the price was really good. The overlap between territories has of course expanded as highways have gotten better, but that regionallity does still exist. Case in point, when I used to drive US 20 out to Freeport every six weeks or so, I'd pass a New Holland dealer about halfway between Rockford and Freeport. That area is the only place I ever recall seeing New Holland equipment working the fields.

Dennis Storzek

 


Re: Help with Assorted Freight Car Truck Colors

Tony Thompson
 

John Golden wrote:

I'm working on a few models for a friend and your assistance please with trucks colors for the following:

SP 1937 box cars, BC Red car, circa 1950

   When built, the trucks would have had black sideframes. If repainted after WW II, they would have body color trucks. So if the lettering has the spelled-out road name, it is the post-1946 paint scheme and would have BCR trucks. If initial only as reporting mark, likely black.

Tony Thompson




Re: National Archives photo - 13 March 1941

Jim and Barbara van Gaasbeek
 

It isn’t in the Navy Yard.

 

http://members.trainweb.com/bedt/indloco/dlwwallaboutterm.html

 

There were additional railroad car-float terminals on Wallabout Creek – they are also documented on different parts of that website.

 

Jim van Gaasbeek

Irvine, California

 


Re: National Archives photo - 13 March 1941

Jim and Barbara van Gaasbeek
 

Brian,

 

Wallabout was a car-float served DLW yard adjacent to Wallabout Creek.  Looks like it would have been very difficult to work.

 

 

Jim van Gaasbeek

Irvine, California


Re: MDC heavy duty trucks

Mike Bradley
 

They were originally offered with the MDC Bessemer & Lake Erie 3 bay hopper.

Mike Bradley

On Wednesday, April 15, 2020, 9:55:29 PM EDT, Todd Sullivan via groups.io <sullivant41@...> wrote:


Does anyone remember what freight car - MDC or Athearn - they went under?  My memory banks failed me on this one.

Todd Sullivan.


Re: Tamiya Flat Clear TS-80 spray can

Mark Rossiter
 

I found out the hard way what apparently many other modelers already knew – using an alcohol/India ink solution over a freight car (or structure) previously sprayed with Dullcoat  would cause a reaction with the talc powder suspended in the Dullcoat which would result in the chalking/blushing mentioned.  I thought I had ruined a model I spent months on until it was pointed out that another coat of Dullcoat or Glosscoat would eliminate the problem.  Thankfully it was true.

 

Mark Rossiter


Re: FARMALL TRACTOR DECALS

Nelson Moyer
 

Doug provided the history for the WCFN, but if you’re interested in the flat car, it’s very similar to the CB&Q FM-11/11A flat cars built between 1928 and 1930, and they too rode on Andrews trucks. The major difference is length, as the WCFN car is probably 40 ft. or 42 ft. and the CB&Q car was 45 ft. The only visible difference other than length is the FM-11 has 13 stake pockets per side and the WCFN car has 12 stake pockets. The Q cars ran into the 1970s with many converted to TOFC service. A few FM-11As were converted to push plow service by installing a wedge blade on one end and building a box on the deck to hold boulders for ballast. A resin kit is available from Jerry Hamsmith with CB&Q decals. It’s a very well designed kit and relatively easy to build.

 

Nelson Moyer                                                                                           

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Lloyd Keyser
Sent: Saturday, April 18, 2020 11:23 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] FARMALL TRACTOR DECALS

 

I would like to know more about that flat car. It appears to be on Andrews trucks

Lloyd Keyser

 

On Sat, Apr 18, 2020 at 7:57 AM Nelson Moyer <npmoyer@...> wrote:

Sounds like the best way to way to go is to check the business listings in phone books for the year you model in the towns you model and see what you find. Another resource here in Iowa is centennial books – many towns and counties issued them in conjunction with their centennial.  While finding centennial books in public libraries has been easy, finding period phone books has been challenging.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Friday, April 17, 2020 11:41 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] FARMALL TRACTOR DECALS

 

On Fri, Apr 17, 2020 at 11:58 AM, Nelson Moyer wrote:

With all this talk of tractor loads, I'm wondering if there were regional followings for either Farmall red or John Deere green. I remember seeing mostly red in Indiana in the 1940 and 1950 on visits to the grandparent's farm. With plants in Moline and Waterloo, would John Deere be more prevalent in Iowa than Farmall?

Jim Ogden touched on this but let me add, it's more granular than that. It didn't really matter where the factory was - the factory could ship nationwide - that's why we see photos of tractors on flatcars. What really mattered is where their distributors were. You're not going to see a flatcar load of green tractors spotted at the team track ramp of a town with only an IH distributorship. That would be red tractor territory. Farmers tended to buy what they could easily get serviced. No sense buying a tractor from a dealer two towns over unless the price was really good. The overlap between territories has of course expanded as highways have gotten better, but that regionallity does still exist. Case in point, when I used to drive US 20 out to Freeport every six weeks or so, I'd pass a New Holland dealer about halfway between Rockford and Freeport. That area is the only place I ever recall seeing New Holland equipment working the fields.

Dennis Storzek

 


Re: GM&O and A&WP colors

golden1014
 

Hi Scott,

Answers to two of your questions:

2.  I would call Georgia Road cars "Freight Car Red".  They were not brown, but more Oxide.  Like PRR FCC but with some oxide mixed in.  I would say close to L&N color, but more red.

3.  Nope, no CofG 1-1/2 door cars had Superior doors.  All Youngstown.

John Golden


Help with Assorted Freight Car Truck Colors

golden1014
 

Hi Guys,

I'm working on a few models for a friend and your assistance please with trucks colors for the following:

SP 1937 box cars, BC Red car, circa 1950

Monon 3-pocket hoppers, car color is FC Red

IHB 1937 box car, FC Brown car.

Thanks!
John

John Golden
Ramstein-Miesenbach, Germany

RPM Blog: https://railroadprototypemodeler.wordpress.com/


Re: Painting brass

bob.stetser@...
 

Soak in lacquer thinner for a couple of hours to remove whatever is on the model.

Run twice in the ultrasonic cleaner, let dry

Spray, from rattle can, Rust-Oleum Primer, SELF ETCHING PRIMER, let dry

Spray with airbrush color of choice.

Bake 1 hour in oven at 185 degrees, leave in oven until cool.


Re: Rapido HO cars for sale

Gerald Henriksen
 

On Fri, 10 Apr 2020 22:21:39 +0000, you wrote:

Rapido announced a third run of their meat reefers, and they're taking orders for four packs with new paint schemes. The red Swift scheme is in this run.
https://rapidotrains.com/products/ho-scale/freight-cars/ho-scale-37-general-american-garx-reefer

They are available in four packs, with the models packaged so that
dealers can break up a four pack into individual sales.

If you dealer doesn't offer them individually, you can buy them
individually from Rapido (though it will it appears be a random road
number).


Swift 3300

nyc3001 .
 

In light of the recent discussion about the Swift 2500 series reefer that will be released by Rapido, I was wondering if anyone had ever kitbashed or produced a 3300-series reefer. This series seems to comprise the most-numerous wood Swift reefer. 

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