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Re: LifeLike 8000 gallon Tanks

Tim O'Connor
 

Bill

Just a historical note - some of the original Front Range kits were painted with
"Accupaint" (actually Fred B showed the supplier to SMP) but the pad print lettering
was done with another paint or ink. When I stripped them in Accupaint thinner (not
harmful to the plastic) the paint dropped off immediately - leaving the lettering
intact! Only with further stripping (I think Scalecoat or Chameleon paint remover) did
the lettering come off.





On 9/5/2019 6:44 AM, Bill Welch wrote:
Schuyler, I don't see how you can remove the lettering w/o removing the underlying silver. As Tim suggests it is in kit form, remove the paint and repaint. I have had great result removing paint on L-L kits w/91% Isopropyl Alcohol  BTW there are several L-L unassembled tank cars on eBay if you do need a kit form.

Bill Welch

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: LifeLike 8000 gallon Tanks

O Fenton Wells
 

Schuyler, have you tried Scalecoat paint remover?  I use it for removing paint and stripping cars.It will take off more than the lettering.

--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Re: LifeLike 8000 gallon Tanks

Bill Welch
 

Schuyler, I don't see how you can remove the lettering w/o removing the underlying silver. As Tim suggests it is in kit form, remove the paint and repaint. I have had great result removing paint on L-L kits w/91% Isopropyl Alcohol  BTW there are several L-L unassembled tank cars on eBay if you do need a kit form.

Bill Welch


Re: LifeLike 8000 gallon Tanks

Tim O'Connor
 


is it a kit or RTR?

if a kit, I'd just strip the tank and repaint it. Small amounts of lettering can be
removed easily enough with various techniques, but CONOCO is a lot to remove and
even if successful the underlying paint may still reveal it as "ghost" lettering.




On 9/4/2019 11:12 PM, Schuyler Larrabee via Groups.Io wrote:

I should have asked this years ago. 

 

I have a couple of these which are lettered CONOCO.  I would very much like to remove the lettering, but I’d also like not to lose the silver paint on the tank, because the scheme I will finish the car with is silver as well, with the same parting lines between the silver and the black frame.

 

However, I have tried everything I know has been recommended for removing lettering, short of my air eraser, to remove the lettering.  Nothing seemed to touch the lettering – or the silver paint, for that matter.

 

I’m reluctant to simply paint over the lettering, as it has some relief from the tank itself, and I’m pretty sure it would easily be visible as a “painted that over, huh?’ model.  Not the desired result.

 

Suggestions?

 

Schuyler



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


MDC 3-bay hopper mystery

D. Scott Chatfield
 

Everybody loves a good mystery, right?

I'm holding an old MDC rib-side 3-bay (HO) with the longitudinal ballast gates.  The crossdump version was long ago superseded by the Atlas 9-panel 3-bay (has there been anything better?), but I started this thing many years ago to make a Southern ballast hopper.  Made quite a bit of progress until I took a long look at those 9-panel sides (should be 10 on a ballast hopper) and realized I was going to have quite the problem making the eight large letters of the name SOUTHERN look right since they wouldn't be centered.  Oh well....on to the next project....

(Turns out FEC rebuilt some 9-panel crossdumps into ballast hoppers, so there is an after-the-fact sorta-prototype for this model.  But that happened long after 1960.)

(Get to the mystery, Blind Dog.)  So recently I dug it out of the heap to make it into a stand-in for another railroad that didn't exist before 1960 and pawn it off on a friend.

Looking the sides I see a little plate on the lower left side with the number 12 in raised letters. Huh?  And is this 12 on the other side?  Of course not.  It's 170.  

What the flying fudge are those supposed to mean?

And yes, they're on the crossdump version too. 


Scott Chatfield


LifeLike 8000 gallon Tanks

Schuyler Larrabee
 

I should have asked this years ago. 

 

I have a couple of these which are lettered CONOCO.  I would very much like to remove the lettering, but I’d also like not to lose the silver paint on the tank, because the scheme I will finish the car with is silver as well, with the same parting lines between the silver and the black frame.

 

However, I have tried everything I know has been recommended for removing lettering, short of my air eraser, to remove the lettering.  Nothing seemed to touch the lettering – or the silver paint, for that matter.

 

I’m reluctant to simply paint over the lettering, as it has some relief from the tank itself, and I’m pretty sure it would easily be visible as a “painted that over, huh?’ model.  Not the desired result.

 

Suggestions?

 

Schuyler


Latest from My Workbench - Tank Cars

Bruce Griffin
 

Friends,

Nothing too exciting for experienced modelers in my latest blog post about tank cars on my Modeling the B&O Old Main Line, but I did have success removing printed numbers from Kadee tank cars and media blasting plastic trucks with baking soda. A couple of thank yous to members of this group included. A nice distraction from ballasting trackwork. Take a look...

https://bomodeling.com/blog/

Best Regards,
Bruce D. Griffin
Ashland, MD


Mid-Atlantic Railroad Prototype Modelers Meet - Sep 19-22

Doug Chapman
 

The Mid-Atlantic Railroad Prototype Modelers meet will be held in Linthicum (Baltimore), Maryland on September 19-22, 2019.  Full information is available at http://www.marpm.org/


Two full days of clinics, lots of models on display, well-known vendors, operating sessions and open houses will be featured at this meet.  This is a great opportunity to share camaraderie, information and great models. You’ll enjoy this Railroad Prototype Modelers event. Hope to see you there!


Doug Chapman
MARPM Team


Re: [MFCL] EJ&E Open Hopper?

Steve and Barb Hile
 

The best description might be Rebuilt hopper.
 
In the 1954 ORER, EJ&E had about 1700 hoppers with identical dimensions in the series 40000 - 41699.  With a little digging and some help from Ed Hawkins I can find that
 
40000 - 40199 were built by Mt Vernon in 1937
40200 - 40799 were built by ACF in 1940
40800 - 41099 were built by Pullman Standard in 1940
41100 - 41399 were built by GATC in 1940
41400 - 41699 were built by Ralston in 1940
 
A builder's photo of 41400 side and end appears at the following interesting web site
 
 
It would appear that all of these cars could have been built to the same basic offset side and heaped end design with the hopper door spacing being of the Enterprise design, but the sides had eleven posts making them not an ARA Standard design or its derivatives.
 
At some later time, probably in the 1960's, some fraction of these cars were rebuilt with the external post sides and ends with a reduced capacity of 2140 cu ft as opposed to the 2338 original.  In a 1972 ORER there were 787 cars in this series, some with 50 ton trucks and some with 55 ton trucks.
 
Further details are left as an exercise for those interested.
 
Steve Hile



From: MFCL@groups.io [mailto:MFCL@groups.io] On Behalf Of brian_banna via Groups.Io
Sent: Tuesday, September 03, 2019 1:23 PM
To: MFCL@groups.io
Subject: [MFCL] EJ&E Open Hopper?

Anyone have any idea what hopper this is? Who manufactured it or what its official name is?



I know it is not made in HO scale. Just curious on what to call it.

Brian


Re: Tugs on Flatcars

Jim Gates
 

A fairly decent website on the Army's small tugs: http://www.usarmysttugs.com/index.html

Jim Gates

On Tuesday, September 3, 2019, 1:29:56 PM CDT, Edward <edb8391@...> wrote:


And, the US Army's 'navy' included several ferryboats in NY Harbor, to serve the First Army base on Governor's Island.
At one time, Governor's Island also had a railroad of sorts, operated by the US Army and served by car float from Brooklyn.
It was phased out after WW I.

Ed B


Re: For sale

Matthew Hurst
 

The tender is an Oriental Limitied PRR class 210f82a Welded tender with the 3 man dog house and 8 wheel trucks.  This version also has the "Trainphone" equipment on it as well.

Matthew



On September 3, 2019, at 7:14 PM, Thomas Klosterman <tom.klosterman@...> wrote:


Is the M1 tender a long distance one or a short one?


Re: For sale

Thomas Klosterman
 

Is the M1 tender a long distance one or a short one?


Re: Tugs on Flatcars

Ken Vandevoort <apo09324@...>
 

On Mon, Sep 2, 2019 at 03:37 PM, Bill Welch wrote:
I did know the Army had its own Navy.

Bill Welch
The Air Force also had its own Navy.  Don't know if they still do, but the boats were part of Air Force Communications Service back in the late 60's.

Ken Vandevoort


Re: Tugs on Flatcars

spsalso
 

From David H. Grover's "U. S. Army Ships and Watercraft of World War II":

In WWII, the Army had more vessels than the Navy--about twice as many (127,793).

This included a number of stern and side-wheelers.  And some sailing ships.

It's a terrific book!


Ed

Edward Sutorik


Re: Tugs on Flatcars

Nolan Hinshaw
 

On Sep 3, 2019, at 07:34, Bob Webber <rgz17@comcast.net> wrote:

Higgins built ships for the Army in (or just outside of) New Orleans
Thank you; I’d forgotten. What I still remember is that San Francisco’s Fort Mason was the Army’s port of embarkation for the Pacific, and State Belt rails brought freight in from WP and Santa Fe car floats and from an interchange with the SP at King Street along East Street (AKA The Embarcadero) and through a tunnel under Black Point to Fort Mason and the Presidio. See Bill Kaufman’s _The State Belt_, Signature Press, for that railroad connection.

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Re: Tugs on Flatcars

Edward
 

And, the US Army's 'navy' included several ferryboats in NY Harbor, to serve the First Army base on Governor's Island.
At one time, Governor's Island also had a railroad of sorts, operated by the US Army and served by car float from Brooklyn.
It was phased out after WW I.

Ed B


Re: USATC WWII tank cars

Richard Townsend
 

AC&F built at least some of them. One is shown in Kaminski's AC&F book (not the tank car book). I have one of the models. I'm planning on using Archer rivets to make the car into a two-compartment car, adding Tichy manways and safety valves, and creating a new underframe from Intermountain parts.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Tue, Sep 3, 2019 8:50 am
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] USATC WWII tank cars

Nothing like them in the US. They are not two compartment cars; a standard dome of adequate capacity would not fit European clearances, so two smaller domes were used. Note only one dome has a manway and safety valves. Likely the underframes have something in common with the same builder's domestic product... anyone know who built them?

Dennis Storzek


Re: USATC WWII tank cars

Dennis Storzek
 

Nothing like them in the US. They are not two compartment cars; a standard dome of adequate capacity would not fit European clearances, so two smaller domes were used. Note only one dome has a manway and safety valves. Likely the underframes have something in common with the same builder's domestic product... anyone know who built them?

Dennis Storzek


Re: Tugs on Flatcars

Bob Webber
 

Higgins built ships for the Army in (or just outside of) New Orleans - they were large, ocean going vessels for supply. In addition, the Army had all sorts of small craft, they were the agent of control for large passenger ships, etc. At one point, the Army controlled more ships than many, many navies. This is not unlike their air component - after the USAF was created, the Army still controlled many small & cargo planes. I wonder how many people remember "The Wackiest Ship In The Army" (not the same thing, but the name is in line)

BTW - the steel for one of Higgins creations was brought from Bessemer over night (due to perceived need) - on the rear of a ....SOU passenger train.

Higgins started his boat business providing boats for oil rigs, swamp logging, and other festivities - and most of his creations, up to the Army ships & the C-46s - were delivered by STMFC to Virginia, and points west.

At 05:37 PM 9/2/2019, Bill Welch wrote:
I did know the Army had its own Navy.

Bill Welch
Bob Webber


Re: Flat Car Load Placement

Fred Jansz
 

Garth, here's a pic of the lettering you refer to.
Should your decails vanish in thin air (vaporated water..), Bill Kennedy makes new WP flatcar decals, including the text on the picture.
Best regards, Fred Jansz

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