Date   

Re: Old square bottle Floquil paints.

Jack Burgess
 

Denny….

 

I have been using the same thing as Nelson is using since Floquil was discontinued and it works just like Diosol…

 

Jack Burgess

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Nelson Moyer
Sent: Sunday, April 14, 2019 6:37 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Old square bottle Floquil paints.

 

Testors offered Floquil Thinner and Brush Cleaner, (F110001) as a Diosol replacement. I bought two one pint cans back then, and it seems to work fine. Diosol is a mix of xylene and toluene and probably other chemicals, but I don’t know the percentages.

 

Nelson Moyer

 


Re: Old square bottle Floquil paints.

Nelson Moyer
 

Testors offered Floquil Thinner and Brush Cleaner, (F110001) as a Diosol replacement. I bought two one pint cans back then, and it seems to work fine. Diosol is a mix of xylene and toluene and probably other chemicals, but I don’t know the percentages.

 

Nelson Moyer

 


Re: Old square bottle Floquil paints.

Jeff Coleman
 

I have been using  Xylene for 25 years with Floquil paints. The  clear Amber could be glase or high gloss. 

Jeff Coleman

On Sun, Apr 14, 2019 at 3:17 AM Al Gest <alfredgest@...> wrote:
As I remember “retarder” was clear and smelled like xylene; however,  “glaze” was brown or rum colored.

Al
> On Apr 14, 2019, at 6:51 AM, Denny Anspach <danspachmd@...> wrote:
>
> I have quite a few of the older square bottle Floquil paints that are still both useful and relatively easy to use.  I am running out of Diosol solvent and looking for a substitute  peer-grade air brush solvent.  In California we cannot purchase automobile grade high quality lacquer thinner that would probably serve, having to make do with hardware store clean up grades (or a trip to Reno).  Do listers have recommendations for a good substitute?
>
> Also, I have an unopened Floquil bottle (label gone) the contents of which seems to be that akin in color and thickness of a dark rum.  I suspect this is Retarder, but do not know.  Any ideas?
>
> Denny S. Anspach MD
> Sacramento CA
>
>
>
>
>
>
>





Re: Old square bottle Floquil paints.

Al Gest
 

As I remember “retarder” was clear and smelled like xylene; however, “glaze” was brown or rum colored.

Al

On Apr 14, 2019, at 6:51 AM, Denny Anspach <danspachmd@...> wrote:

I have quite a few of the older square bottle Floquil paints that are still both useful and relatively easy to use. I am running out of Diosol solvent and looking for a substitute peer-grade air brush solvent. In California we cannot purchase automobile grade high quality lacquer thinner that would probably serve, having to make do with hardware store clean up grades (or a trip to Reno). Do listers have recommendations for a good substitute?

Also, I have an unopened Floquil bottle (label gone) the contents of which seems to be that akin in color and thickness of a dark rum. I suspect this is Retarder, but do not know. Any ideas?

Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento CA







Re: Old square bottle Floquil paints.

Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi Denny,

It has been quite some time since I've used it, but I suspect your unlabeled bottle of "dark rum" might be Floquil "glaze." In addition to imparting some luster, as opposed to gloss, to Floquil's otherwise flat finish, I recall it was recommended for making seriously thinned Floquil less "watery." Wish I could remember exactly how Floquil put it.

Pax,


Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com

-----Original Message-----
From: Denny Anspach
Sent: Sunday, April 14, 2019 12:51 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Old square bottle Floquil paints.

I have quite a few of the older square bottle Floquil paints that are still both useful and relatively easy to use. I am running out of Diosol solvent and looking for a substitute peer-grade air brush solvent. In California we cannot purchase automobile grade high quality lacquer thinner that would probably serve, having to make do with hardware store clean up grades (or a trip to Reno). Do listers have recommendations for a good substitute?

Also, I have an unopened Floquil bottle (label gone) the contents of which seems to be that akin in color and thickness of a dark rum. I suspect this is Retarder, but do not know. Any ideas?

Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento CA


Re: Walthers HO 1944 AAR modified boxcar

naptownprr
 

Thanks Randy, I didn't know that.


Jim


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Randy Hammill <nhrr@...>
Sent: Sunday, April 14, 2019 12:55 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Walthers HO 1944 AAR modified boxcar
 
The Improved Dreadnaught End was a trademarked design by Standard Railway Equipment Manufacturing Co (SREM).

Randy 
--
Randy Hammill
Modeling the New Haven Railroad 1946-1954

--

Randy Hammill
Modeling the New Haven ! Railroad 1946-1954  | https//:blog.newbritainstation.com


Re: Old square bottle Floquil paints.

Roger Huber <trainpainter@...>
 

Danny,

I have used Scalecoat thinner for years with no issues. The unknown bottle might be gloss as I believe the FQ retarder was clear.

Roger Huber
Deer Creek Locomotive Works


On Saturday, April 13, 2019, 11:51:40 PM CDT, Denny Anspach <danspachmd@...> wrote:


I have quite a few of the older square bottle Floquil paints that are still both useful and relatively easy to use.  I am running out of Diosol solvent and looking for a substitute  peer-grade air brush solvent.  In California we cannot purchase automobile grade high quality lacquer thinner that would probably serve, having to make do with hardware store clean up grades (or a trip to Reno).  Do listers have recommendations for a good substitute?

Also, I have an unopened Floquil bottle (label gone) the contents of which seems to be that akin in color and thickness of a dark rum.  I suspect this is Retarder, but do not know.  Any ideas?

Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento CA







Re: Walthers HO 1944 AAR modified boxcar

Randy Hammill
 

The Improved Dreadnaught End was a trademarked design by Standard Railway Equipment Manufacturing Co (SREM).

Randy 
--
Randy Hammill
Modeling the New Haven Railroad 1946-1954

--

Randy Hammill
Modeling the New Haven Railroad 1946-1954  | https//:blog.newbritainstation.com


Old square bottle Floquil paints.

Denny Anspach
 

I have quite a few of the older square bottle Floquil paints that are still both useful and relatively easy to use. I am running out of Diosol solvent and looking for a substitute peer-grade air brush solvent. In California we cannot purchase automobile grade high quality lacquer thinner that would probably serve, having to make do with hardware store clean up grades (or a trip to Reno). Do listers have recommendations for a good substitute?

Also, I have an unopened Floquil bottle (label gone) the contents of which seems to be that akin in color and thickness of a dark rum. I suspect this is Retarder, but do not know. Any ideas?

Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento CA


Re: Throwback Thursday: Athearn Rolling Stock Ad, Model Railroader, February 1959

gary laakso
 

When Central Valley offered their fully detailed underbody for Atheran box cars, I used them to replace virtually all of my blue box boxcar under frames.  

Gary Laakso
Northwest of Mike Brock


On Apr 13, 2019, at 7:30 PM, mopacfirst <ron.merrick@...> wrote:

All of this brings to mind my days of modifying Athearn cars, since they and MDC were the only games in town.  In about 1970 I made a Santa Fe Fe-26 (40' double door box) by cutting up the Athearn model of the Fe-24 50' double door car.  I took one panel out of each side, with corresponding cuts in the roof.  This resulted in a 43' car, but it was distinctive and as far as I know, no one who saw it in that era ever realized the difference.  Even better, it was painted boxcar red as far as I can recall because the Floquil mineral red hadn't appeared yet.

The mention of the 14 roof panels triggered this memory.  I must have cut the panels in such a way as to preserve the spacing of the panels, because I worked with two end-roof-side pieces.

I may still have this car.  All of my Athearn cars that once operated on the club layout I belonged to are in one box somewhere.

Ron Merrick


Re: Throwback Thursday: Athearn Rolling Stock Ad, Model Railroader, February 1959

mopacfirst
 

All of this brings to mind my days of modifying Athearn cars, since they and MDC were the only games in town.  In about 1970 I made a Santa Fe Fe-26 (40' double door box) by cutting up the Athearn model of the Fe-24 50' double door car.  I took one panel out of each side, with corresponding cuts in the roof.  This resulted in a 43' car, but it was distinctive and as far as I know, no one who saw it in that era ever realized the difference.  Even better, it was painted boxcar red as far as I can recall because the Floquil mineral red hadn't appeared yet.

The mention of the 14 roof panels triggered this memory.  I must have cut the panels in such a way as to preserve the spacing of the panels, because I worked with two end-roof-side pieces.

I may still have this car.  All of my Athearn cars that once operated on the club layout I belonged to are in one box somewhere.

Ron Merrick


Re: Walthers HO 1944 AAR modified boxcar

D. Scott Chatfield
 

>What is SREM improved?  a typo?

SREM is Standard Railway Equipment Manufacturing Company, later nicknamed Stanray.  The several Dreadnaught ends were their product.

Scott Chatfield


Re: Walthers HO 1944 AAR modified boxcar

Tony Thompson
 

What is SREM improved?  a typo?

   SRE is Standard Railway Equipment, later calling itself Stanray, but not in the time zone of this list.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: Doors with inside detail

Dennis Storzek
 

On Sat, Apr 13, 2019 at 01:48 PM, Brian Carlson wrote:
Steve. The steel ribs, actually steel bar only appeared on the outside of superior doors. The inside would be flat steel plate. 
In reality they are not bars, but ribs pressed into the bottom edge of each sheet that assembles into the door. Each sheet laps over the open pressing on the sheet above and is welded top and bottom, forming a series of closed box sections that give the door its strength. However, it is correct that other than the weld seems, the inside of the door is smooth. Here is a drawing with a sectional view of a typical Superior door: Superior Door

Dennis Storzek


Re: Doors with inside detail

Bill Welch
 

Based on what Brian says my approach may have been wrong but on one of my Sunshine 1932 models. Clinchfield I think. I spliced together two Menzes/Athearn metal doors to get the correct rib count. I left the bare metal unpainted as there was some real rust and the bare metal reflected whatever light gets on it.

Bill Welch


Re: Walthers HO 1944 AAR modified boxcar

naptownprr
 

What is SREM improved?  a typo?


Jim Hunter


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Randy Hammill <nhrr@...>
Sent: Saturday, April 13, 2019 5:42 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Walthers HO 1944 AAR modified boxcar
 
In regards to the terminology, best I can tell the 10’6” IH was added as an optional standard in 1941, and didn’t change again until 1947 when the 10’0” IH was removed from
the standard.

What we often call ‘1944’ or ‘postwar’ cars simply have SREM Improved Dreadnaugh Ends, but the standard itself didn’t change. Those just happened to be the latest (trademarked) end they produced. The majority were 10’6” IH cars, but as we know, there were a fair number of 10’0” IH cars built too.

The “proper” terminology is something I’ve been trying to figure out, because some of it is modeler/railfan/historian terminology, rather than from the actual standards. It is helpful to a certain extent, but we are usually using visible components to describe the variants when I believe the standard was more about the dimensions and underframe is than the carbody. This means, for example, that we often omit cars with Pullman-Standard or ACF carbuilders ends from identification lists as if they weren’t AAR Standard cars of whichever type.

Technically, I think that a 10’0” IH car with an Improved Dreadnaught End is a 1937 AAR Standard Car, and one with a 10’6” IH is a Modified 1937 AAR Standard Car, if built before 1947 anyway. After that point it’s a 1947(?) AAR Standard Car. 

I know that’s not the terminology we usually use, but what do the experts think?

Randy

Randy Hammill
Modeling the New Haven Railroad 1946-1954  | https//:blog.newbritainstation.com


Re: Walthers HO 1944 AAR modified boxcar

Randy Hammill
 

In regards to the terminology, best I can tell the 10’6” IH was added as an optional standard in 1941, and didn’t change again until 1947 when the 10’0” IH was removed from
the standard.

What we often call ‘1944’ or ‘postwar’ cars simply have SREM Improved Dreadnaugh Ends, but the standard itself didn’t change. Those just happened to be the latest (trademarked) end they produced. The majority were 10’6” IH cars, but as we know, there were a fair number of 10’0” IH cars built too.

The “proper” terminology is something I’ve been trying to figure out, because some of it is modeler/railfan/historian terminology, rather than from the actual standards. It is helpful to a certain extent, but we are usually using visible components to describe the variants when I believe the standard was more about the dimensions and underframe is than the carbody. This means, for example, that we often omit cars with Pullman-Standard or ACF carbuilders ends from identification lists as if they weren’t AAR Standard cars of whichever type.

Technically, I think that a 10’0” IH car with an Improved Dreadnaught End is a 1937 AAR Standard Car, and one with a 10’6” IH is a Modified 1937 AAR Standard Car, if built before 1947 anyway. After that point it’s a 1947(?) AAR Standard Car. 

I know that’s not the terminology we usually use, but what do the experts think?

Randy

Randy Hammill
Modeling the New Haven Railroad 1946-1954  | https//:blog.newbritainstation.com


Re: Doors with inside detail

Brian Carlson
 

Steve. The steel ribs, actually steel bar only appeared on the outside of superior doors. The inside would be flat steel plate. 

On Apr 13, 2019, at 4:24 PM, StephenK <thekays100@...> wrote:

I am assembling an old IMWX 1937 AAR Boxcar.   I have an interior detail kit and am planning on modeling the car with one door open.   The wooden floor and walls from the kit will show thru.   But the door that comes with the kit has no detail on the inside.   I know this almost never makes a difference, but it would be cool if I could show the inside corrugations of the closed door.   (It is a Superior door).   I thought about using the outside detail as a mold and  pressing aluminum foil on it, which would probably work but would really be delicate.   

Any ideas?

Steve Kay


Re: Doors with inside detail

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Stephen,

Why not scratch build a door with at least minimal detail on the inside? All you need is a photo of a Superior door from the back (maybe a car interior shot), some thin styrene sheet and strip, and a lot of little tiny rivets, maybe from Archer. You might consider making a few extras and stashing them for the future.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 4/13/19 4:24 PM, StephenK wrote:
I am assembling an old IMWX 1937 AAR Boxcar.   I have an interior detail kit and am planning on modeling the car with one door open.   The wooden floor and walls from the kit will show thru.   But the door that comes with the kit has no detail on the inside.   I know this almost never makes a difference, but it would be cool if I could show the inside corrugations of the closed door.   (It is a Superior door).   I thought about using the outside detail as a mold and  pressing aluminum foil on it, which would probably work but would really be delicate.   

Any ideas?

Steve Kay


Re: Doors with inside detail

Tony Thompson
 

Sounds like it would work. It won’t be handled, so if you can get it installed it should be fine.
Tony Thompson 


On Apr 13, 2019, at 1:24 PM, StephenK <thekays100@...> wrote:

I am assembling an old IMWX 1937 AAR Boxcar.   I have an interior detail kit and am planning on modeling the car with one door open.   The wooden floor and walls from the kit will show thru.   But the door that comes with the kit has no detail on the inside.   I know this almost never makes a difference, but it would be cool if I could show the inside corrugations of the closed door.   (It is a Superior door).   I thought about using the outside detail as a mold and  pressing aluminum foil on it, which would probably work but would really be delicate.   

Any ideas?

Steve Kay