Date   

Re: hi tech HO air hoses

Richard McQuade
 

Looks like more that a few satisfied customers here! Thanks for the quick responses and tips!
Richard


Re: hi tech HO air hoses

Jack Burgess
 

Nelson has a good summary which seems to be the same as my experience. Keep in mind that the air hose needs to be installed tipped toward the coupler at a 30 degree angle, not straight down.

 

Jack Burgess

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Nelson Moyer
Sent: Tuesday, May 21, 2019 3:27 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] hi tech HO air hoses

 

I’ve used then since they were first introduced with the Precision Scale bracket. The PS brackets have dimple for starting the bit, but the castings aren’t always complete at the U-bolt, so I ‘ve lost a few by drilling through the side of the U-bolt. Start the hole with a #79 bit, then move up to a #77, then a #76. The air pipe on the air hose sometimes has a casting line with flash that interferes with threading it through the U-bold. I ‘ve cut off the flash with a double edge razor blade, which has a thinner blade and is sharper than a single edge razor blade. If the flash is minimal, I taper the end of the air pipe slightly to get it started while threading it into the U-bolt. I bought some YMW air hose brackets to try, but I haven’t used any yet. The detail is better on PS brackets, but the YMW brackets look like it would be easier to thread the air pipe since the hole is drilled before bending, and the metal isn’t as hard to drill.

 

Anybody want to buy a large supply of Kadee plastic air hoses cheap?

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Richard McQuade via Groups.Io
Sent: Tuesday, May 21, 2019 4:35 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] hi tech HO air hoses

 

I have posted this request with the Early Rails Grp already but thought I would ask this grp too. I'm interested in "investing" in Hi Tech HO freight car air hoses and would like to know what experiences people have had with them. I would be equipping about 80 pieces of rolling stock so this would be a significant expenditure in resources. They offer 22" and 26" lengths in HO. I presume the 22" is for earlier eras  Any info or insights about them would be appreciated.
Thanks.
Richard


Re: hi tech HO air hoses

Fran Giacoma
 

I installed the 22” hoses (a mix of with and without brackets) on 120 cars on my September 1956 era layout. Once installed, I paint them Tamiya German Grey XF-63, the closest color of a faded rubber hose in my eyes. I also replace the plastic ones with them when broken.
Fran Giacoma


Re: SFRD Rr-46 B end photo.

Scott
 

Thank you, Tim for the photo!

Also thank you for the offline replies I am all set now.

Thanks
Scott McDonald


Re: hi tech HO air hoses

Scott
 

I agree with the others.  I use the ones that come with the cast metal bracket because it looks nice.

Scott McDonald


Re: hi tech HO air hoses

webotkin
 

Hi Richard,

 

I have been using Hi-Tech air hoses for several years and they are excellent.  On new cars, I use them when I am building the car.  For cars with plastic air hoses, I replace them as they break.  Obviously the advantage is that they don’t break and look as good as the cast plastic ones!  To attach them I use AC cement or canopy glue.  Both seem to work fine.  Also, I paint them before installing with Floquil rail brown which seems to stick to the rubber surface.  About the only downside is that you can’t form a curve in them like you can with plastic hoses.

 

William E. Botkin

Centennial, CO

 


Re: hi tech HO air hoses

Nelson Moyer
 

I’ve used then since they were first introduced with the Precision Scale bracket. The PS brackets have dimple for starting the bit, but the castings aren’t always complete at the U-bolt, so I ‘ve lost a few by drilling through the side of the U-bolt. Start the hole with a #79 bit, then move up to a #77, then a #76. The air pipe on the air hose sometimes has a casting line with flash that interferes with threading it through the U-bold. I ‘ve cut off the flash with a double edge razor blade, which has a thinner blade and is sharper than a single edge razor blade. If the flash is minimal, I taper the end of the air pipe slightly to get it started while threading it into the U-bolt. I bought some YMW air hose brackets to try, but I haven’t used any yet. The detail is better on PS brackets, but the YMW brackets look like it would be easier to thread the air pipe since the hole is drilled before bending, and the metal isn’t as hard to drill.

 

Anybody want to buy a large supply of Kadee plastic air hoses cheap?

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Richard McQuade via Groups.Io
Sent: Tuesday, May 21, 2019 4:35 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] hi tech HO air hoses

 

I have posted this request with the Early Rails Grp already but thought I would ask this grp too. I'm interested in "investing" in Hi Tech HO freight car air hoses and would like to know what experiences people have had with them. I would be equipping about 80 pieces of rolling stock so this would be a significant expenditure in resources. They offer 22" and 26" lengths in HO. I presume the 22" is for earlier eras  Any info or insights about them would be appreciated.
Thanks.
Richard


Re: MILW & NP log trains

np328
 

     Doug, 
        as an NP researcher of about four decades now this is the best advice I can give you: Join the io NP Modelers list and the io Telltale, the io Milwaukee list also and repost your query there. People who model the log service seem to be a specific grouping, just as Narrow Gauge Modelers are. (Caps out of respect.)  And hope for the best. 
 
     Old gons were used, as were old boxcars stripped of about everything above the underframe till only the skeleton remained. What boxcars were chosen for this task? Boxcars that would otherwise have been scrapped. Boxcars from the 1900s to the 1930s. Needless to say, there is not a lot of paperwork found in records I have seen. These would have been decisions made by shops very local to the area. And shop foremen local to the area.
      From what records I have found, series of (very old) cars would be marked for dismantling. From that group, some would be partially dismantled to be log cars. Again, these were local decisions and would be spot decisions. Records would have been kept in the NP Tacoma offices. 
      Of the little paperwork that I have found, it would read from corporate that from old cars to be retired/dismantled at South Tacoma Car shops, local officers should request what they feel are numbers sufficient to handled next years projected needs. And that would be it for a paper trail, at least here in Minnesota at the MNHS regarding corporate records.  
 
     Log cars are best described as the equivalent of hide cars, just in different service. And just like hide cars, a half-life existence where equipment goes to eventually die having cheated death once.      

     Of modeling, you would need gondolas from the above mentioned dates, perhaps like the class of 1923 59000 series. None of any of these earlier gons I am aware are being produced other than (possibly) resin.  And resin would not be too bad as you could warm the resin sides to where the side panels are bulging rather greatly.
       GS gons like Red Caboose or Detail Associates are not completely accurate for NP however are available at Flea markets and other events. And then again, beat the heck out of those modeling wise. Otherwise Accurail gons. Compromises all.   
     Of skeleton cars, good luck. I and (good friend) the late Ed Ursem spent weeks going through files at the MHS as Ed wanted to model the NP's Raymond branch and we found precious little on skeleton flats or disconnects other than some sketches. Certainly nothing that could be turned over to a model mfgr and expect to see a tangible model appear.  

    Of photos, there was (available through the nprha company store) a couple of Mainstreeter magazines that may have photos that covered the area of your interest. The Vol 33-4 issue might have some, there was another issue on the branch that ran out to Raymond, WA however I don't readily recall that issue.  Museum of the Rockies has the Ron Nixon collection on-line and that is searchable.  http://www.morphotoarchive.org/rvndb/    Plenty of photos.  You could look there.        
                                                                                                                                                                            Best of luck,             Jim Dick - St. Paul                                 
 
    


Re: hi tech HO air hoses

Brian Carlson
 

They are my go-to for air hoses. They work in most places.  I use them in their bracket and the PSC bracket.  

Use the 22” ones. 

Brian J. Carlson 

On May 21, 2019, at 5:35 PM, Richard McQuade via Groups.Io <richardmcquade@...> wrote:

I have posted this request with the Early Rails Grp already but thought I would ask this grp too. I'm interested in "investing" in Hi Tech HO freight car air hoses and would like to know what experiences people have had with them. I would be equipping about 80 pieces of rolling stock so this would be a significant expenditure in resources. They offer 22" and 26" lengths in HO. I presume the 22" is for earlier eras  Any info or insights about them would be appreciated.
Thanks.
Richard


hi tech HO air hoses

Richard McQuade
 

I have posted this request with the Early Rails Grp already but thought I would ask this grp too. I'm interested in "investing" in Hi Tech HO freight car air hoses and would like to know what experiences people have had with them. I would be equipping about 80 pieces of rolling stock so this would be a significant expenditure in resources. They offer 22" and 26" lengths in HO. I presume the 22" is for earlier eras  Any info or insights about them would be appreciated.
Thanks.
Richard


Re: UP series 10300 to 12499

Brian Carlson
 

In this case the reweigh date of 66 corresponds with the pint date. That was the mid-1960s UP paint scheme.

Brian J. Carlson 

On May 21, 2019, at 5:04 PM, Lester Breuer <rforailroad@...> wrote:

I received a 3 pack Accurail set of the cars shown in the attached photo. The cars do not have the O.-W.R.& N. small letters to show ownership which the Jan. 1953 ORER states they should have.  The cars have R-3-4 ends and have a diagonal panel roof.  Wondering when built and when painted in this paint scheme if prototype exists.
Thank You for your time and effort to help in advance.

Lester Breuer
<BF3838B8-E0C4-4C16-A13A-9A29F33A02C6.jpeg>


UP series 10300 to 12499

Lester Breuer
 

I received a 3 pack Accurail set of the cars shown in the attached photo. The cars do not have the O.-W.R.& N. small letters to show ownership which the Jan. 1953 ORER states they should have.  The cars have R-3-4 ends and have a diagonal panel roof.  Wondering when built and when painted in this paint scheme if prototype exists.
Thank You for your time and effort to help in advance.

Lester Breuer


Re: MILW & NP log trains

espee4441
 

I just returned from a weekend in Enumclaw racing my bicycle around the back roads and going over the old MILW row multiple times. I had much time to ponder what the MILW did while riding circles in the hills for three hours. The 410 quarry above town by a few miles has an interesting bridge going over the highway for the MILW, so I was wondering if they mixed in gons/hoppers with the log loads. This thread is perfect timing. Hard to pin down how the tracks made their way through the terrain in that area, it's steep. 

Tony Pawley


Re: SFRD Rr-46 B end photo.

Tim O'Connor
 

Not a "straight on" photo but you can see the features of the end pretty well in this photo.

Tim O'

On 5/21/2019 2:16 PM, Scott wrote:
Does anybody have the straight on photo of an Rr-46 B end?  I could have sworn that I had one in the Santa Fe historical society book or one of Teds books but cant find it now.  I might be losing my mind and saw it someplace else too.

Thanks,
Scott McDonald
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Re: Early Version Of Auto-Train?

Tim O'Connor
 


Could be used to transport automobiles to Key West or one of the other Keys that were ONLY
accessible by Flagler's Key West extension until the railroad was wiped out and turned into an
automobile road.

Tim O'Connor


On 5/20/2019 2:14 PM, Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io wrote:

Early Version Of Auto-Train?

https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth36627/?q=railroad

Caption: Photograph of a touring car being transported on a railroad car from Orange, Texas to a vacation site. The owner is probably Lutcher Stark, taken in 1914.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


SFRD Rr-46 B end photo.

Scott
 

Does anybody have the straight on photo of an Rr-46 B end?  I could have sworn that I had one in the Santa Fe historical society book or one of Teds books but cant find it now.  I might be losing my mind and saw it someplace else too.  

Thanks,
Scott McDonald


Re: Off topic question

Tim O'Connor
 


Clark, the roof appears to me to be a VIKING roof.

The CNW purchased 50 foot single door (6 foot) box cars with 5/5 ends and they
also rebuilt and lengthened 40 foot single door cars with 4/5 ends (in the 17000's)
but I can't tell from your photo what type of ends are on the car.

Tim O'Connor



On 5/18/2019 1:58 PM, Clark Propst wrote:
Sorry to ask about something past the target date of this group, but know Lloyd Keyser is a member and he might be able to answer my question off line?
The attached car was built in the 40s and re-worked at some point. Lloyd has a similar car in the CNW color book, 37000 series. I remember these cars at work, a friend wants to model one, but we don't know what the ends or roof are nor the width of the door.

Sorry and thanks,
CW Propst
 

Attachments:

_._,_._,_

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: MILW & NP log trains

John Riddell
 

There are two photos in Warren Wing’s book that show NP hauling log cars.

Northwest Rail Pictorial Vol 1, page 111 shows a 1954 train with 3 steel gons loaded with logs passing through Reservation (Tacoma) .

Northwest Rail Pictorial Vol II, page 100 shows another view of the same log train with a log-bunk flat and a skeleton log car following the 3 loaded steel gons.  John Riddell

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Re: Image of SWIFT TANK LINE tank cars

Lester Breuer
 

If one were to attempt to build a model of one of the Swift Line tank cars, what would be the best model to start with?
Lester Breuer


Re: Unloading Airplane Engines

John Barry
 

Spen,

You were the first to tie in the PLANT, which completed the story linking to Texas.

John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights
Caen, Normandy where B-24s missed the bridges and caused a number of civilian casualties trying to isolate the beaches from a counterattack.


707-490-9696 


PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736

--------------------------------------------

On Tue, 5/21/19, Spen Kellogg <spninetynine@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Unloading Airplane Engines
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Date: Tuesday, May 21, 2019, 5:19 AM

On 5/20/2019 4:01 PM, John Barry
wrote:
> Ding, ding , ding Spend is a
winner!  The photo location is inside AF plant 4 located
adjacent to Fort Worth Army Airfield, later Carswell AFB,
and now Joint Reserve Base Fort Worth. The government owned,
contractor operated plant was constructed by the Defence
Plant Corporation in 1941 and operated by Consolidated
Aircraft and it's successors. The main production
building is over a mile long. I didn't get to see it ful
of B-24s, but I did see it in the 80's with the F-16. A
very impressive sight And although the Brewster Buckaneer
cowl is similar, their plants were in NY and PA.
>
>
Thank
you, John, but there at least three who posted B-24 before
me.

Spen Kellogg