Date   

hi tech HO air hoses

Richard McQuade
 

I have posted this request with the Early Rails Grp already but thought I would ask this grp too. I'm interested in "investing" in Hi Tech HO freight car air hoses and would like to know what experiences people have had with them. I would be equipping about 80 pieces of rolling stock so this would be a significant expenditure in resources. They offer 22" and 26" lengths in HO. I presume the 22" is for earlier eras  Any info or insights about them would be appreciated.
Thanks.
Richard


Re: UP series 10300 to 12499

Brian Carlson
 

In this case the reweigh date of 66 corresponds with the pint date. That was the mid-1960s UP paint scheme.

Brian J. Carlson 

On May 21, 2019, at 5:04 PM, Lester Breuer <rforailroad@...> wrote:

I received a 3 pack Accurail set of the cars shown in the attached photo. The cars do not have the O.-W.R.& N. small letters to show ownership which the Jan. 1953 ORER states they should have.  The cars have R-3-4 ends and have a diagonal panel roof.  Wondering when built and when painted in this paint scheme if prototype exists.
Thank You for your time and effort to help in advance.

Lester Breuer
<BF3838B8-E0C4-4C16-A13A-9A29F33A02C6.jpeg>


UP series 10300 to 12499

Lester Breuer
 

I received a 3 pack Accurail set of the cars shown in the attached photo. The cars do not have the O.-W.R.& N. small letters to show ownership which the Jan. 1953 ORER states they should have.  The cars have R-3-4 ends and have a diagonal panel roof.  Wondering when built and when painted in this paint scheme if prototype exists.
Thank You for your time and effort to help in advance.

Lester Breuer


Re: MILW & NP log trains

espee4441
 

I just returned from a weekend in Enumclaw racing my bicycle around the back roads and going over the old MILW row multiple times. I had much time to ponder what the MILW did while riding circles in the hills for three hours. The 410 quarry above town by a few miles has an interesting bridge going over the highway for the MILW, so I was wondering if they mixed in gons/hoppers with the log loads. This thread is perfect timing. Hard to pin down how the tracks made their way through the terrain in that area, it's steep. 

Tony Pawley


Re: SFRD Rr-46 B end photo.

Tim O'Connor
 

Not a "straight on" photo but you can see the features of the end pretty well in this photo.

Tim O'

On 5/21/2019 2:16 PM, Scott wrote:
Does anybody have the straight on photo of an Rr-46 B end?  I could have sworn that I had one in the Santa Fe historical society book or one of Teds books but cant find it now.  I might be losing my mind and saw it someplace else too.

Thanks,
Scott McDonald
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Re: Early Version Of Auto-Train?

Tim O'Connor
 


Could be used to transport automobiles to Key West or one of the other Keys that were ONLY
accessible by Flagler's Key West extension until the railroad was wiped out and turned into an
automobile road.

Tim O'Connor


On 5/20/2019 2:14 PM, Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io wrote:

Early Version Of Auto-Train?

https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth36627/?q=railroad

Caption: Photograph of a touring car being transported on a railroad car from Orange, Texas to a vacation site. The owner is probably Lutcher Stark, taken in 1914.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


SFRD Rr-46 B end photo.

Scott
 

Does anybody have the straight on photo of an Rr-46 B end?  I could have sworn that I had one in the Santa Fe historical society book or one of Teds books but cant find it now.  I might be losing my mind and saw it someplace else too.  

Thanks,
Scott McDonald


Re: Off topic question

Tim O'Connor
 


Clark, the roof appears to me to be a VIKING roof.

The CNW purchased 50 foot single door (6 foot) box cars with 5/5 ends and they
also rebuilt and lengthened 40 foot single door cars with 4/5 ends (in the 17000's)
but I can't tell from your photo what type of ends are on the car.

Tim O'Connor



On 5/18/2019 1:58 PM, Clark Propst wrote:
Sorry to ask about something past the target date of this group, but know Lloyd Keyser is a member and he might be able to answer my question off line?
The attached car was built in the 40s and re-worked at some point. Lloyd has a similar car in the CNW color book, 37000 series. I remember these cars at work, a friend wants to model one, but we don't know what the ends or roof are nor the width of the door.

Sorry and thanks,
CW Propst
 

Attachments:

_._,_._,_

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: MILW & NP log trains

John Riddell
 

There are two photos in Warren Wing’s book that show NP hauling log cars.

Northwest Rail Pictorial Vol 1, page 111 shows a 1954 train with 3 steel gons loaded with logs passing through Reservation (Tacoma) .

Northwest Rail Pictorial Vol II, page 100 shows another view of the same log train with a log-bunk flat and a skeleton log car following the 3 loaded steel gons.  John Riddell

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Re: Image of SWIFT TANK LINE tank cars

Lester Breuer
 

If one were to attempt to build a model of one of the Swift Line tank cars, what would be the best model to start with?
Lester Breuer


Re: Unloading Airplane Engines

John Barry
 

Spen,

You were the first to tie in the PLANT, which completed the story linking to Texas.

John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights
Caen, Normandy where B-24s missed the bridges and caused a number of civilian casualties trying to isolate the beaches from a counterattack.


707-490-9696 


PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736

--------------------------------------------

On Tue, 5/21/19, Spen Kellogg <spninetynine@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Unloading Airplane Engines
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Date: Tuesday, May 21, 2019, 5:19 AM

On 5/20/2019 4:01 PM, John Barry
wrote:
> Ding, ding , ding Spend is a
winner!  The photo location is inside AF plant 4 located
adjacent to Fort Worth Army Airfield, later Carswell AFB,
and now Joint Reserve Base Fort Worth. The government owned,
contractor operated plant was constructed by the Defence
Plant Corporation in 1941 and operated by Consolidated
Aircraft and it's successors. The main production
building is over a mile long. I didn't get to see it ful
of B-24s, but I did see it in the 80's with the F-16. A
very impressive sight And although the Brewster Buckaneer
cowl is similar, their plants were in NY and PA.
>
>
Thank
you, John, but there at least three who posted B-24 before
me.

Spen Kellogg


Re: Unloading Airplane Engines

Spen Kellogg <spninetynine@...>
 

On 5/20/2019 4:01 PM, John Barry wrote:
Ding, ding , ding Spend is a winner! The photo location is inside AF plant 4 located adjacent to Fort Worth Army Airfield, later Carswell AFB, and now Joint Reserve Base Fort Worth. The government owned, contractor operated plant was constructed by the Defence Plant Corporation in 1941 and operated by Consolidated Aircraft and it's successors. The main production building is over a mile long. I didn't get to see it ful of B-24s, but I did see it in the 80's with the F-16. A very impressive sight And although the Brewster Buckaneer cowl is similar, their plants were in NY and PA.

Thank you, John, but there at least three who posted B-24 before me.

Spen Kellogg


Re: MILW & NP log trains

Todd Sullivan
 

There are several photos in the NP steam loco books by Schrenk and Frey.  Look in the sections on the 2-8-2s with photos in Washington State.  Sorry I can't be more specific - all my books are packed for a move.

Todd Sullivan


Re: MILW & NP log trains

Allen Montgomery
 

Google image the Camas Prairie Railroad. There's a couple shots of NP log car ops.


Allen Montgomery



On Monday, May 20, 2019, 4:17:22 PM MDT, Doug Paasch <drpaasch@...> wrote:


I need to model some MILW and NP log cars used in Washington State in the 1940's & 50's time frame.  I am having no luck finding any photos of prototype log trains & log cars for either railroad.  I did find a diagram of an NP log flat at the NPRHA.  It doesn't show how they held the logs on it though, just the flat car itself.  And I'd really like to find some photos.  These log trains were not logging trains of timber companies, but rather ran in interchange service to log dumps serving mills in Everett & Tacoma.  What type of car is appropriate?  For example, regular flat cars with stakes?  Regular flat cars with log cradles?  Skeleton log cars?  Any pointers would be appreciated.
Thanks!

Doug Paasch




MILW & NP log trains

Doug Paasch
 

I need to model some MILW and NP log cars used in Washington State in the 1940's & 50's time frame. I am having no luck finding any photos of prototype log trains & log cars for either railroad. I did find a diagram of an NP log flat at the NPRHA. It doesn't show how they held the logs on it though, just the flat car itself. And I'd really like to find some photos. These log trains were not logging trains of timber companies, but rather ran in interchange service to log dumps serving mills in Everett & Tacoma. What type of car is appropriate? For example, regular flat cars with stakes? Regular flat cars with log cradles? Skeleton log cars? Any pointers would be appreciated.
Thanks!

Doug Paasch


Re: Unloading Airplane Engines

John Barry
 

Spen, not the ((-№"₦@: auto correct mis-spelling

John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights
Caen, Normandy on my cell phone

707-490-9696 


PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736

--------------------------------------------

On Tue, 5/21/19, John Barry <northbaylines@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Unloading Airplane Engines
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Date: Tuesday, May 21, 2019, 12:01 AM

Ding, ding , ding Spend is a winner! 
The photo location is inside AF plant 4 located adjacent to
Fort Worth Army Airfield, later Carswell AFB, and now Joint
Reserve Base Fort Worth. The government owned, contractor
operated plant was constructed by the Defence Plant
Corporation in 1941 and operated by Consolidated Aircraft
and it's successors. The main production building is over a
mile long. I didn't get to see it ful of B-24s, but I did
see it in the 80's with the F-16. A very impressive sight
And although the Brewster Buckaneer cowl is similar, their
plants were in NY and PA.

John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA


707-490-9696 


PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736

--------------------------------------------
On Mon, 5/20/19, Spen Kellogg <spninetynine@...>
wrote:

Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Unloading
Airplane Engines
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Date: Monday, May 20, 2019, 9:25 PM


    On 5/20/2019
11:58 AM, Bob Chaparro via
      Groups.Io wrote:

   
   
      An
undated photo. Note
          the
packaging of the propellers.
      https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth41072/?q=railroad
      Perhaps
one of our
         
airplane experts can tell us what kind of engines
these are.
     

   
    Bob,

   

    The look like Pratt and
Whitney Twin Wasp radial engines
for the
    Consolidated B-24 bomber
used extensively in Europe
during the later
    part of WWII.

   

    https://www.lockheedmartin.com/en-us/news/features/history/b-24.html

   

    Scroll down on this page
to see a photo and description
of the
    engine mounted on the
plane.

   

    http://www.aviation-history.com/consolidated/b24.html

   

    I am making an educated
guess. since the photo is
credited to
    Lockheed Martin, Fort
Worth, Texas. Consolidated was
absorbed into
    Lockheed and the B-24
was built in Fort Worth, among
several other
    locations. The oval
shape of the nacelle was evocative
of the B-24.
    The propellers are
clearly three bladed. I would guess
that the
    photo was taken in
1943.

   

    Spen Kellogg


Re: Unloading Airplane Engines

John Barry
 

Ding, ding , ding Spend is a winner! The photo location is inside AF plant 4 located adjacent to Fort Worth Army Airfield, later Carswell AFB, and now Joint Reserve Base Fort Worth. The government owned, contractor operated plant was constructed by the Defence Plant Corporation in 1941 and operated by Consolidated Aircraft and it's successors. The main production building is over a mile long. I didn't get to see it ful of B-24s, but I did see it in the 80's with the F-16. A very impressive sight And although the Brewster Buckaneer cowl is similar, their plants were in NY and PA.

John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA


707-490-9696 


PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736

--------------------------------------------

On Mon, 5/20/19, Spen Kellogg <spninetynine@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Unloading Airplane Engines
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Date: Monday, May 20, 2019, 9:25 PM


On 5/20/2019
11:58 AM, Bob Chaparro via
Groups.Io wrote:



An
undated photo. Note
the packaging of the propellers.
https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth41072/?q=railroad
Perhaps
one of our
airplane experts can tell us what kind of engines
these are.



Bob,



The look like Pratt and Whitney Twin Wasp radial engines
for the
Consolidated B-24 bomber used extensively in Europe
during the later
part of WWII.



https://www.lockheedmartin.com/en-us/news/features/history/b-24.html



Scroll down on this page to see a photo and description
of the
engine mounted on the plane.



http://www.aviation-history.com/consolidated/b24.html



I am making an educated guess. since the photo is
credited to
Lockheed Martin, Fort Worth, Texas. Consolidated was
absorbed into
Lockheed and the B-24 was built in Fort Worth, among
several other
locations. The oval shape of the nacelle was evocative
of the B-24.
The propellers are clearly three bladed. I would guess
that the
photo was taken in 1943.



Spen Kellogg


Re: Early Version Of Auto-Train?

Brent Greer
 

That Florida East Coast flatcar sure is far from home ! (Unless perhaps the destination "vacation site" is sunny Florida - perhaps even across the overseas railway to Key West)

Never the less, now I have a new FEC flatcar I will have to try to model...

Brent
________________________________
Dr. J. Brent Greer


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io <chiefbobbb@...>
Sent: Monday, May 20, 2019 2:14:17 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Early Version Of Auto-Train?
 

Early Version Of Auto-Train?

https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth36627/?q=railroad

Caption: Photograph of a touring car being transported on a railroad car from Orange, Texas to a vacation site. The owner is probably Lutcher Stark, taken in 1914.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Unloading Airplane Engines

Spen Kellogg <spninetynine@...>
 

On 5/20/2019 11:58 AM, Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io wrote:

An undated photo. Note the packaging of the propellers.

https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth41072/?q=railroad

Perhaps one of our airplane experts can tell us what kind of engines these are.


Bob,

The look like Pratt and Whitney Twin Wasp radial engines for the Consolidated B-24 bomber used extensively in Europe during the later part of WWII.

https://www.lockheedmartin.com/en-us/news/features/history/b-24.html

Scroll down on this page to see a photo and description of the engine mounted on the plane.

http://www.aviation-history.com/consolidated/b24.html

I am making an educated guess. since the photo is credited to Lockheed Martin, Fort Worth, Texas. Consolidated was absorbed into Lockheed and the B-24 was built in Fort Worth, among several other locations. The oval shape of the nacelle was evocative of the B-24. The propellers are clearly three bladed. I would guess that the photo was taken in 1943.

Spen Kellogg


Re: Unloading Airplane Engines

BRIAN PAUL EHNI
 

At a guess, B24. They had an elliptical shape due to the crescent openings on each side 

Thanks!
Brian Ehni 
(Sent from my iPhone)

On May 20, 2019, at 12:58 PM, Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

An undated photo. Note the packaging of the propellers.

https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth41072/?q=railroad

Perhaps one of our airplane experts can tell us what kind of engines these are.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA