Date   

Re: Interior Photo: Southern Ry Boxcar 39864 With Graphite Load

Bruce Smith
 


Southern 39864 is, as noted in the stencil, equipped with automobile loaders. It is interesting to note the stencil indicating that they were oiled 7/52. You can see part of the rack at the top of the photo.

Regards,
Bruce 
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io <chiefbobbb@...>
Sent: Saturday, June 22, 2019 10:06 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Interior Photo: Southern Ry Boxcar 39864 With Graphite Load
 

Photo from the Library of Congress:

https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/co0853.photos.316872p/


Click on photo to enlarge it.

The stenciling on the car's interior indicates it has some special load equipment.

Caption:

View of inside of rail car containing graphite delivered to Building 444. The graphite was formed into molds and crucible for use in the foundry. (1/12/54) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Poultry Car

Lester Breuer
 

A wonderful find and reference.  Thank You for sharing.
Lester Breuer


Re: Interior Photo: Southern Ry Boxcar 39864 With Graphite Load

Jack Mullen
 

On Sat, Jun 22, 2019 at 08:06 PM, Bob Chaparro wrote:
The stenciling on the car's interior indicates it has some special load equipment.
The car appears to be an auto car - opening is for a double door.  The notice on the interior reads:
FRAME WHEN EMPTY MUST BE RAISED
TO ROOF AND SECURELY HELD BY
SAFETY HOOKS BEFORE CAR IS MOVED
I believe the "frame" referred to is an Evans auto loader,  unrelated to the current load. 
Jack Mullen


Poultry Car

Douglas Harding
 

A friend recently found this photo if a 1928 Rock Island employee magazine. It shows a combination poultry refrigerator car. Not many of these were built, photos are quite rare. They were used for shipping live poultry, as well as eggs and dress poultry.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 


Photos: Flat Cars With Special Loads

Bob Chaparro
 

Photos from the Library of Congress. Click on photos to enlarge.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

++++

https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2017690225/

Caption:

Shipbuilding. "Liberty" ships. These flat cars loaded with prefabricated and assembled sections for ships under construction at a large Eastern yard are leaving nearby plant formerly used for the manufacture of Pullman cars. The work of this plant means many valuable months saved in building of Uncle Sam's Liberty Fleet. All parts are prefabricated in this huge Eastern plant which formerly turned out freight cars. The completed sections are then carried six miles to the ways on flat cars. Bethlehem- Fairfield Shipyards Inc., Baltimore, Maryland

++++

https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/ia0185.photos.068165p/

Caption:

View Of Flat Car, Dam - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 19, Upper Mississippi River, Keokuk, Lee County, IA


Interior Photo: Southern Ry Boxcar 39864 With Graphite Load

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo from the Library of Congress:

https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/co0853.photos.316872p/

Click on photo to enlarge it.

The stenciling on the car's interior indicates it has some special load equipment.

Caption:

View of inside of rail car containing graphite delivered to Building 444. The graphite was formed into molds and crucible for use in the foundry. (1/12/54) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Does Anyone Recognize the Troop Sleepers in this picture?

Bruce Smith
 

Gary,


I think that those might be PRR P30A troop sleepers (modified X32 boxcars). What looks like a second level of windows are actually vents.


Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of gary laakso <vasa0vasa@...>
Sent: Saturday, June 22, 2019 7:44 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Does Anyone Recognize the Troop Sleepers in this picture?
 

The two cars are on the track behind the MP steam engines and to the right of the picture:

 

https://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Emil-Albrecht-Photos/1944-May-Troop-Train-East/i-z73p46h/A 

donstrack.smugmug.com
See more

 

They appear to be double deck and much higher than the adjoining pullman. 

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock


Does Anyone Recognize the Troop Sleepers in this picture?

gary laakso
 

The two cars are on the track behind the MP steam engines and to the right of the picture:

 

https://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Emil-Albrecht-Photos/1944-May-Troop-Train-East/i-z73p46h/A 

 

They appear to be double deck and much higher than the adjoining pullman. 

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock


Re: looking for drawings of Reading hopper 60000 - 60999

anthony wagner
 

According to the Reading Modeler site HTb 60000-60599 were built Mar-Aug 1902 by ACF, 60600-60799 May-Sep by Middletown Car Works, and 60800-60999 May-Sep 1902 by Lebanon Manufacturing. 864 cars were rebuilt Feb-Oct 1921 to 61000-61863 HTk by ACF with steel center sills but still with 40Ton Fox trucks. They were retired between 1927 and 1934 but 264 cars were converted to ash service as HTkx in the 90000 and 91000 series except 4 cars sold to Atlantic City Railway in 1927 as 10261-10263 HTkx ash cars. Hope this helps Tony Wagner

On Saturday, June 22, 2019, 2:17:01 PM CDT, steve_wintner via Groups.Io <steve_wintner@...> wrote:


I found this website : http://www.ericsrailroadcarhistory.com/

Maybe of use to you.

Steve


Re: looking for drawings of Reading hopper 60000 - 60999

steve_wintner
 

I found this website : http://www.ericsrailroadcarhistory.com/

Maybe of use to you.

Steve


Re: looking for drawings of Reading hopper 60000 - 60999

vapeurchapelon
 

David, Alexander,
 
many thanks for your replies (and please excuse the delay). The book doesn't have an ISBN #, and my friend doesn't have that book and didn't find one by a quick search. Seems to be a very little run. Do you could provide scans of the mentioned drawings? Of course I would pay some $.
Alexander, unfortunately I (we) don't know the builder, this wasn't mentioned in the caption text.
 
Thanks again and greetings
 
Johannes
 
Gesendet: Montag, 17. Juni 2019 um 14:11 Uhr
Von: "Alexander Schneider Jr" <aschneiderjr@...>
An: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Betreff: Re: [RealSTMFC] looking for drawings of Reading hopper 60000 - 60999

Johannes,

 

Do you know the builder of these cars? That would indicate which library is most likely to have information. For instance, Pullman Library of the Illinois Railway Museum has a majority of the drawings from Pullman and Standard Steel & Car Company, among others, while a different library in St. Louis has most of the American Car & Foundry drawings.

 

Alex Schneider

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of vapeurchapelon
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2019 3:35 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] looking for drawings of Reading hopper 60000 - 60999

 

Hello,

one of my friends is modeling the early 20th century and is interested to build a model of one of the series of 1000 cars of 1902-built Reading wooden coal hoppers #60000 - 60999. I have a picture of #61171 after rebuilding in 1921 (and renumbering, seemingly), but likely it would be wrong to post it here as it is a book scan. I could email it, though.
Does anyone have information of these cars or can point me to some? No matter if original or modernized configuration.

Many thanks and greetings

Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1953

 


Re: Montour twin hopper M 8014

prr6380
 

For this discussion it should be known that "Disco" was a processed product made by Consolidated Coal Co from coal.  It was not an individual mine, but was made in a processing plant.  As far as the Montour Railroad went, they had two groups of hoppers in their fleet.  One set were cars which never left their property and hauled "green" coal from the mines to the coal cleaning plant and a second group of cars used in interchange service.  The first group was liable to include almost anything since they were used in captive industrial service.  If you are interested in finding more about Disco, search "Disco coal" in Google.

Walt Stafa


Re: Another slice

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Mark,

 

Your steamy shower method has professional endorsement.

 

The Smithsonian has been doing the same thing for years with old drawings.  The man responsible for this had a memorable name, which (of course) I can’t remember right now – I am pretty sure his last name was Loony, or something like that.  But he used a bathroom in the Smithsonian building to get rolled prints and drawings to begin to flatten out.  He hung the drawings using clips and then ran the shower in the room for an hour or so.  The next day he’d look at them.  Some ready to take down, others needing another blast of the shower’s humidity.  I remember him saying that some rolls only expanded a few inches so he was hanging a roll of drawings still about 6” in diameter.

 

He was interviewed in either Railway & Locomotive Historical Society’s newsletter or possibly in the publication of the Industrial Archaeology Society.

 

Given his age when I read this, I suspect Mr. Loony is no longer with us . . . at the very least, he’s got to be retired.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of mark_landgraf via Groups.Io
Sent: Tuesday, June 18, 2019 8:40 AM
To: Bob Webber <rgz17@...>; main@RealSTMFC.groups.io; STMFC <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Another slice

 

Bob

 

It's so much fun to work with 100 year old paper. 

 

I've found that high humidity helps temporarily get rid of the brittleness in old paper prints. 

 

Steamtown uses a large steam box that they have. I have used a galvanized steel trash can with a few bricks in the bottom and about an inch of water in the bottom. Loosen up the rolled drawings, set them on the bricks, and place the cover on the can for a few days. Then unroll the damp drawings and place on a tabletop. In couple of hour they are ready for scanning. 

 

At home, I've been known to hang them in the bathroom. After a couple of steamy showers, they are a lot easier to work with. 

 

Mark

 

On Mon, Jun 17, 2019 at 8:48 PM, Bob Webber

<rgz17@...> wrote:

I scanned a few more tubes - these are a tad earlier - 1904 - 1919 (retracings after 1916).

I bring this up for a number of reasons.

The thread related to cars of 100,000 lbs capacity - of course, isn't germane in the sense that these are steel UF cars, but interesting for all that given the myriad cars of that or greater Cap.
The brake drawings are really interesting, and unlike some later ones, show the out line of cars
A lot of manufacturer & contractor cars
early ish examples of refrigerator & tanks
Several threads of photos & models vonerge in some of these drawings
(Perhaps not surprisingly) several orders for steel UF only

Interesting how "modern" these cars look, even with the very deep sills.  That they are steel (or steel UF) helps but still interesting.

Caveats:
VERY raw, haven't checked for typos
The data is, again, just what's on the drawings' Data Block & Order Info
RR marks are kept as is in most cases
Some of these drawings were kept in tubes in Montreal when a pipe burst, they have the consistency of a 50 yo dollar bill that's been through the wash every day since it was printed
(Will not have time in the next few days to clean up - when I do, it will be added to the web site version of the spread sheet)

Bob Webber


Re: Montour twin hopper M 8014

rwitt_2000
 

On Tue, Jun 18, 2019 at 08:33 AM, Claus Schlund \(HGM\) wrote:
Perhaps these GLa copies were specifically purchased for dedicated service to this one mine for some unknown reason. If the cars were being loaded with coal at the Disco mine, and were also delivering their load of coal to some online destination, then the archbar trucks might not have been an issue since the cars would never leave Montour tracks.
Another thought ... the caption states that DISCO was a preparation plant so it potentially received coal from other mines for washing and grading. This would be a natural need for an online fleet of hoppers.

Bob Witt


Re: GN 5196 - what the?

Tim O'Connor
 

thanks for confirming Bob's mofw hunch...

On 6/19/2019 4:15 PM, spsalso via Groups.Io wrote:
A GN diagram dated May 1, 1969, shows a series X-2305 to X-7845 "Work Equipment Box Car".  In that series, there are 75 for "Material", 48 for "Storage", and 64 for "Tool".  Lengths are from 36' to 50'.

I think Bob got it.


Ed

Edward Sutorik
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Re: (erielack) Steamtown Images - June 19, 2019 - HCCX

Bob Webber
 

In the FWIW column - I did note the stencil & GA (amongst others) for the Standard Steel built Hercules cars. 

At 11:23 AM 6/19/2019, Bruce Smith wrote:
Interestingly, the barge appears to be “Hercules Cement No. 1� and appears to be set up for unloading the covered hoppers on these 1930 photos.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith           

Bob Webber


Re: Another slice

Bob Webber
 

I am not.   What I was trying to describe is the construction - thick, deep steel, punctuated by rivets 5" apart...looking like (not coincidentally) the "old timer" MDC tank car frame of yor .  

I had been concerned when I saw your note that I had done so - and feverishly looked in the drawing DB for that term, only to find it not there.  OTOH, I *HAVE* seen some 3 axle trucked gondolas of the kind the N&W and others had.  I'd have to look for the one I saw, if anyone were curious.  

But then...when you've seen Pullman built tenders, and Standard Steel built B&O tenders (in freight car sequences) and railway gun carriages in passenger car sequences, not much surprises me.


At 09:58 AM 6/19/2019, al.kresse wrote:

Mr Weber, are you describing this 91-ton "battleship gon" car?


Al Kresse
On June 18, 2019 at 9:23 AM Bob Webber <rgz17@...> wrote:

Thanks, Mark.   Actually, *most* of the 100 yo stuff is far easier to work with than the 50 yo stuff - the older stuff uses linen - the problem there is that the starch comes out. But it can be ironed.  Then there is the paper used during WW II - very fragile, and used (mostly) by Osgood Bradley (a lot of bus drawings are gone because of it).  Then we come to mylar - where the emulsion flakes off.  Give me linen - even floppy, post-mold linen - any day! 

We don't have issues with brittleness - save for the flat filed Osgood Bradley mentioned. These freight car drawings are now 115 years old - some of them are as clean & crisp as if they were done yesterday - beautiful piece of art. 

When I opened the tube, there were some very high contrast (non-faded) drawings of steel - deep steel - fish belly underframes.  Gorgeous stuff.  Looks like a battleship of the same era.  Lots of big rivets and bolts.

At 07:39 AM 6/18/2019, mark landgraf wrote:
Bob

It's so much fun to work with 100 year old paper.

I've found that high humidity helps temporarily get rid of the brittleness in old paper prints.

Steamtown uses a large steam box that they have. I have used a galvanized steel trash can with a few bricks in the bottom and about an inch of water in the bottom. Loosen up the rolled drawings, set them on the bricks, and place the cover on the can for a few days. Then unroll the damp drawings and place on a tabletop. In couple of hour they are ready for scanning.

At home, I've been known to hang them in the bathroom. After a couple of steamy showers, they are a lot easier to work with.

Mark

Bob Webber


 


 

Attachments:


Re: GN 5196 - what the?

Robert Heninger
 

Ed,

Thanks for the assist. "Somewhere" I have a copy of that diagram book too, but who knows where "somewhere" is today? Not me.

I just looked again at the photo. I am more certain now that the car is in MOW or some other online storage service - look at how rusty the wheel treads are. This car has been sitting idle for some time.

Regards,
Bob Heninger
Minot, ND


Re: GN 5196 - what the?

spsalso
 

A GN diagram dated May 1, 1969, shows a series X-2305 to X-7845 "Work Equipment Box Car".  In that series, there are 75 for "Material", 48 for "Storage", and 64 for "Tool".  Lengths are from 36' to 50'.

I think Bob got it.


Ed

Edward Sutorik


Re: GN 5196 - what the?

Robert Heninger
 

Tim,

I'm guessing that this car is in MOW service and someone neglected to stencil an "X" in front of the number. The numbers are repainted, so this car was definitely renumbered. There is some small slanted white lettering on the distant end of the car that I can't read, possibly denoting it's MOW assignment. The cars in the background all appear to be GN MOW cars. Although many (most) GN MOW cars were completely repainted, many went into MOW service with  only new patched numbers.

Do you know the date of the photo?

Regards,

Bob Heninger
Minot, ND

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