Date   

Re: Tank Cars: Capitol Refining Company

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Jim,

Relee was never incorporated, and is now part of Pentagon City. It would be interesting to see if Relee ever had a post office or a railroad station under that name. I would not be surprised if the name is a contraction for R.E. Lee, Suh!

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 2/1/19 9:09 PM, James McDonald wrote:
Hello David, Bob, and list,

I’ve done some research on this firm. The Capitol Refining Company in Relee, Virginia (the town no longer exists, and indeed most locals wouldn’t even remember this name) was a facility of the Columbia Cotton Oil and Provisions Corporation that was purchased in June 1913 by the Capitol Refining Company of Buffalo, a firm owned by the Dold family. The facility previously engaged in the processing of cows, hogs, and their parts. Lard had been a major product but there had been a small business in cottonseed oil refining since 1909. When the Buffalo based Capitol Refining Company took over the Relee facility it closed it for “extensive repairs” and the facility reopened in September of 1913 solely as a cottonseed oil refinery.

The Capitol Refining Company would receive freshly pressed cottonseed oil and refine this into various grades, out of which a number of products were manufactured. One of the primary businesses of the Relee facility was the wholesale supply of refined cottonseed oil in barrels to firms that manufactured shortening. Refined cottonseed oil was also used in the manufacture of artificial leather, fiberboard, rubber, and had several other industrial uses. A remnant of the refining process was so-called “soap stock”, which was sold to soap manufacturers for the production of soaps and detergents.

In addition to providing bulk products to manufacturers, the Capitol Refining Company also produced their own line of consumer and commercial goods. Many of these were sold under the brand name “CAPRECO”, based on a shortened version of the firm's full name. Among their consumer product line were such offerings as Potomac Cooking Oil, White Dome Shortening, CAPRECO Choice Winter Oil for Salads, Virginia Choice Butter Oil, and FLEXO shortening. Commercial products included Crispolene Shortening, intended for sale to large bakeries. Their products were held in somewhat high esteem, receiving industry recognition and commendation.

The Capitol Refining Company facility in Relee was located on the Rosslyn Connecting Railroad. This shortline ran from a junction with the Washington Southern Railroad just south of Long Bridge along the Potomac River north to Rosslyn, Virginia, a distance of 3 miles. The Rosslyn Connecting Railroad was wholly owned by the Pennsylvania Railroad, whose trains serviced this branch from freight yards in Washington, DC. The Richmond, Fredericksburg & Potomac also had trackage rights on the Rosslyn Connecting Railroad as far north as the CAPRECO facility.

The Capitol Refining Company made good use of its rail connection. The spur into the facility had two tracks for the receiving and two tracks for the shipping departments, respectively. The firm received six hopper cars a week of coal, to power their operations and create steam for sanitation. By 1917 approximately 1,000 carloads of raw cottonseed oil were received each season. Refined products were sent out from the facility in tank cars, barrels, drums, or for retail, boxed tins and bottles. Hydrogenated cottonseed oil was also shipped in bags. The firm also had an ice plant, and although they sold ice directly to customers, I’ve yet to find any mention of them shipping ice by rail.

The firm rostered a fleet of 100 their own tank cars. The cars were numbered in the range CRWX 201 to 300. The lower portion of the CRWX number range appears to have been occupied by 8,000 gal cars manufactured by American Car & Foundry in Milton, Pa. in November of 1913. The higher portion of the number range was occupied by cars manufactured by The German-American Transportation Company. Photographs show that the GATC cars appear to have had their reporting marks changed. I surmise that these were likely cars that had previously been in the Dold Company's JDPX tank car fleet and were repainted as CRWX with the expansion into Virginia. The Dold company control over the Capitol Refining Company fleet is evident in that any reports on the CRWX cars' use were to be made not to Relee, Virginia, but to the Capitol Refining Company's offices in Buffalo, where the Dold company originated.

Little can be found of the firm’s demise. It appears they were a victim of the Great Depression, shuttering quietly in 1933. The facility sat abandoned for years before the land was sold off. The area where the factory once stood and the Potomac River shoreline have been modified to a point that all traces of the facility are gone, but it was located roughly just west of where Interstate 395 meets routes 1 and 110, in the Pentagon’s south parking lot.

All the best,

James

=-=-=
James McDonald
Greenbelt, MD.









Re: Throwback Thursday: Westerfield

Jerry Michels
 

The most efficient way I found to build resin kits is to line up about three or four (especially if they are variations of the same basic car) and spend a good weekend working on them.

Jerry Michels


Re: Flat Black

Tim O'Connor
 

Denny it sounds like they simply eliminated the retarder in the paint - that would cause it to go
on flat. Assuming that it's really the same TruColor paint that uses the same thinner.  If you still
have some AP retarder you might want to try that. (Unless TruColor sells it - I did not check.)

On 2/1/2019 8:00 PM, Denny Anspach wrote:
I appreciate the many suggestions for water-based acrylics, but…... I use only solveny- based paints.

Tim expresses skepticism about TruColor flat black being only “brushable”, as well he might. My information came directly by phone from one of TruColor’s owners in Phoenix, and I am sure it has something to do with why my tries with this thinned paint with an airbrush have not been satisfactory.’'

Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, CA 95864
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Re: NP stock car replacement ends for CV kit

mopacfirst
 

All of these have now been spoken for.

Ron Merrick


Re: Tank Cars: Capitol Refining Company

James McDonald
 

Hello David, Bob, and list,

I’ve done some research on this firm. The Capitol Refining Company in Relee, Virginia (the town no longer exists, and indeed most locals wouldn’t even remember this name) was a facility of the Columbia Cotton Oil and Provisions Corporation that was purchased in June 1913 by the Capitol Refining Company of Buffalo, a firm owned by the Dold family. The facility previously engaged in the processing of cows, hogs, and their parts. Lard had been a major product but there had been a small business in cottonseed oil refining since 1909. When the Buffalo based Capitol Refining Company took over the Relee facility it closed it for “extensive repairs” and the facility reopened in September of 1913 solely as a cottonseed oil refinery.

The Capitol Refining Company would receive freshly pressed cottonseed oil and refine this into various grades, out of which a number of products were manufactured. One of the primary businesses of the Relee facility was the wholesale supply of refined cottonseed oil in barrels to firms that manufactured shortening. Refined cottonseed oil was also used in the manufacture of artificial leather, fiberboard, rubber, and had several other industrial uses. A remnant of the refining process was so-called “soap stock”, which was sold to soap manufacturers for the production of soaps and detergents.

In addition to providing bulk products to manufacturers, the Capitol Refining Company also produced their own line of consumer and commercial goods. Many of these were sold under the brand name “CAPRECO”, based on a shortened version of the firm's full name. Among their consumer product line were such offerings as Potomac Cooking Oil, White Dome Shortening, CAPRECO Choice Winter Oil for Salads, Virginia Choice Butter Oil, and FLEXO shortening. Commercial products included Crispolene Shortening, intended for sale to large bakeries. Their products were held in somewhat high esteem, receiving industry recognition and commendation.

The Capitol Refining Company facility in Relee was located on the Rosslyn Connecting Railroad. This shortline ran from a junction with the Washington Southern Railroad just south of Long Bridge along the Potomac River north to Rosslyn, Virginia, a distance of 3 miles. The Rosslyn Connecting Railroad was wholly owned by the Pennsylvania Railroad, whose trains serviced this branch from freight yards in Washington, DC. The Richmond, Fredericksburg & Potomac also had trackage rights on the Rosslyn Connecting Railroad as far north as the CAPRECO facility.

The Capitol Refining Company made good use of its rail connection. The spur into the facility had two tracks for the receiving and two tracks for the shipping departments, respectively. The firm received six hopper cars a week of coal, to power their operations and create steam for sanitation. By 1917 approximately 1,000 carloads of raw cottonseed oil were received each season. Refined products were sent out from the facility in tank cars, barrels, drums, or for retail, boxed tins and bottles. Hydrogenated cottonseed oil was also shipped in bags. The firm also had an ice plant, and although they sold ice directly to customers, I’ve yet to find any mention of them shipping ice by rail.

The firm rostered a fleet of 100 their own tank cars. The cars were numbered in the range CRWX 201 to 300. The lower portion of the CRWX number range appears to have been occupied by 8,000 gal cars manufactured by American Car & Foundry in Milton, Pa. in November of 1913. The higher portion of the number range was occupied by cars manufactured by The German-American Transportation Company. Photographs show that the GATC cars appear to have had their reporting marks changed. I surmise that these were likely cars that had previously been in the Dold Company's JDPX tank car fleet and were repainted as CRWX with the expansion into Virginia. The Dold company control over the Capitol Refining Company fleet is evident in that any reports on the CRWX cars' use were to be made not to Relee, Virginia, but to the Capitol Refining Company's offices in Buffalo, where the Dold company originated.

Little can be found of the firm’s demise. It appears they were a victim of the Great Depression, shuttering quietly in 1933. The facility sat abandoned for years before the land was sold off. The area where the factory once stood and the Potomac River shoreline have been modified to a point that all traces of the facility are gone, but it was located roughly just west of where Interstate 395 meets routes 1 and 110, in the Pentagon’s south parking lot.

All the best,

James

=-=-=
James McDonald
Greenbelt, MD.


Re: Flat Black

Tony Thompson
 

Denny Anspach wrote:

Off list, I have received a strong vote for Tamiya flat black,, and I am going to try it. So far, Tamiya (solvent) is the most consistent rising star in my model painting world, and incrementally I use them more and more.
I have been very happy with a number of the Tamiya colors, and the paint behaves very nicely. This is true for the bottled paint and especially for the spray cans, which have an excellent nozzle (light-years from the hardware store stuff). I included some comments on the paint in a more general commentary on Tamiya in a blog post. If you're interested, here is a link:

https://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2018/08/a-shout-out-for-tamiya-products.html

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Flat Black

Bruce Smith
 

​Why decant? I use the model master spry cans as is. They work greta and while you don't have the control of an airbrush, I paint all my brass models with them and then have painted some resin kits such as my recent C&O hopper build


Regards

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...>
Sent: Friday, February 1, 2019 7:23 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Flat Black
 
Denny Anspach asked:
"I am not adverse to using rattle cans from the hardware store, except that for the fine small work that we commonly do, the lack of control and the very wide pattern promises to cause a lot of mischief, not mention waste and paint scatter.  I have often though of emptying one of these cans into a receptacle and then using it again through an air brush. Has anyone tried this?  It would be relatively cheap, I would think."

Instructional video:


Ben Hom


Re: vertically mounted Klasing power hand brake

Owen Thorne
 

Chuck,
Is this the vertically mounted Klasing brake you are seeking? If so I have one I will send you.


Owen Thorne


Flat Black

Andy Carlson
 

Years ago a very prolific and excellent professional painter told me he used an auto body product for priming his steam locomotives (and I see no reason that resin kits couldn't benefit as well).

It was called a non-sanding primer, meant to be used before color was applied in the re-finish work done at collision repair shops.

This stuff was NOT a surfacer, which is the commonly used primer which builds thickness which allows pre-color block sanding. The non-sanding goes on smooth and if shot over a smooth surface, this last primer is ready for color paint after it dries. This is the trait which allows good model priming, and as a lacquer type of finish, it is quick drying, another useful modeling trait. Auto lacquer primers seem to be universally OK with many different types of paints, water based and solvent based.

I have not yet acquired any of this yet, so I have no experience so far.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

On Friday, February 1, 2019, 5:01:05 PM PST, Denny Anspach <danspachmd@...> wrote:


I appreciate the many suggestions for water-based acrylics, but…... I use only solveny- based paints.

Tim expresses skepticism about TruColor flat black being only “brushable”, as well he might.  My information came directly by phone from one of TruColor’s owners in Phoenix, and I am sure it has something to do with why my tries with this thinned paint with an airbrush have not been satisfactory.’'

I am not adverse to using rattle cans from the hardware store, except that for the fine small work that we commonly do, the lack of control and the very wide pattern promises to cause a lot of mischief, not mention waste and paint scatter.  I have often though of emptying one of these cans into a receptacle and then using it again through an air brush. Has anyone tried this?  It would be relatively cheap, I would think.

Off list, I have received a strong vote for Tamiya flat black,, and I am going to try it. So far, Tamiya (solvent) is the most consistent rising star in my model painting world, and incrementally I use them more and more.

Denny

Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, CA 95864




Re: Flat Black

Benjamin Hom
 

Denny Anspach asked:
"I am not adverse to using rattle cans from the hardware store, except that for the fine small work that we commonly do, the lack of control and the very wide pattern promises to cause a lot of mischief, not mention waste and paint scatter.  I have often though of emptying one of these cans into a receptacle and then using it again through an air brush. Has anyone tried this?  It would be relatively cheap, I would think."

Instructional video:


Ben Hom


Re: Flat Black

Denny Anspach
 

I appreciate the many suggestions for water-based acrylics, but…... I use only solveny- based paints.

Tim expresses skepticism about TruColor flat black being only “brushable”, as well he might. My information came directly by phone from one of TruColor’s owners in Phoenix, and I am sure it has something to do with why my tries with this thinned paint with an airbrush have not been satisfactory.’'

I am not adverse to using rattle cans from the hardware store, except that for the fine small work that we commonly do, the lack of control and the very wide pattern promises to cause a lot of mischief, not mention waste and paint scatter. I have often though of emptying one of these cans into a receptacle and then using it again through an air brush. Has anyone tried this? It would be relatively cheap, I would think.

Off list, I have received a strong vote for Tamiya flat black,, and I am going to try it. So far, Tamiya (solvent) is the most consistent rising star in my model painting world, and incrementally I use them more and more.

Denny

Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, CA 95864


Re: Throwback Thursday: Westerfield

Joseph
 

I’ve built quite a few, maybe 75 or 100.   I am personally responsible for a plastic X-3 not being offered until I get my 3 Sunshine kits finished. A small stash.  My favorites are the Storzek Soo Line sawtooth boxcar, I think I have built 5.   Probably don’t need another of those.

A friend has what we call the resin kit wall of shame- should keep him busy for 10 years...100 kits, but that seems low

A good resin kit is really fun to build and operate

Thanks to all the manufacturers who make these available 

Joe Binish


On Feb 1, 2019, at 6:25 PM, william darnaby <wdarnaby@...> wrote:

 

 

I have been assembling resin cars for over 30 years.  I remember seeing samples of Al’s first castings for the G22 gon during an operating session, I think, in his own basement at the John Galt Lines when he was still in Elk Grove Village.  So, all of my first efforts were with his kits.  Sometime in the latter half of the 80’s I was at Rensselaer Poly for EMD to a lubrication seminar and I became acquainted with the kits they sold through the club which led me to West Shore and Yankee Clipper.  I think I first saw Sunshine at the 1990 Pittsburgh NMRA convention.  In the good old days of Naperville I would go home with a dozen or more Sunshine kits.  Of course, I am not trying to slight F&C, SC&F and Yarmouth of whose cars I have done many.  My future widow is going to have to dispose of over 500 finished resin cars which will probably crash the market if she hits ebay all at once.  However, she probably won’t bother as she has seen other widows try and sell equipment on ebay.

 

Bill Darnaby

 

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of al_westerfield
Sent: Thursday, January 31, 2019 6:10 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Westerfield

 

The first of 29 years of monthly ads.  Believe it or not, I still ran into people at train shows that had never heard of us. – Al Westerfield

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Benjamin Hom
Sent: Thursday, January 31, 2019 3:00 PM
To: STMFC
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Westerfield

 

Railroad Model Craftsman, October 1982 issue, ad for the first four offerings from Westerfield.

 

 

Ben Hom

 


Re: Throwback Thursday: Westerfield

william darnaby
 

 

 

I have been assembling resin cars for over 30 years.  I remember seeing samples of Al’s first castings for the G22 gon during an operating session, I think, in his own basement at the John Galt Lines when he was still in Elk Grove Village.  So, all of my first efforts were with his kits.  Sometime in the latter half of the 80’s I was at Rensselaer Poly for EMD to a lubrication seminar and I became acquainted with the kits they sold through the club which led me to West Shore and Yankee Clipper.  I think I first saw Sunshine at the 1990 Pittsburgh NMRA convention.  In the good old days of Naperville I would go home with a dozen or more Sunshine kits.  Of course, I am not trying to slight F&C, SC&F and Yarmouth of whose cars I have done many.  My future widow is going to have to dispose of over 500 finished resin cars which will probably crash the market if she hits ebay all at once.  However, she probably won’t bother as she has seen other widows try and sell equipment on ebay.

 

Bill Darnaby

 

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of al_westerfield
Sent: Thursday, January 31, 2019 6:10 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Westerfield

 

The first of 29 years of monthly ads.  Believe it or not, I still ran into people at train shows that had never heard of us. – Al Westerfield

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Benjamin Hom
Sent: Thursday, January 31, 2019 3:00 PM
To: STMFC
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Westerfield

 

Railroad Model Craftsman, October 1982 issue, ad for the first four offerings from Westerfield.

 

 

Ben Hom

 


Re: Flat Black

 

Dan and Jeff – Thanks for the info.  Yes, I remember the changes in solvents in Floquil.  Since I sprayed straight out of the bottle it didn’t bother me.   – Al Westerfield

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Daniel A. Mitchell
Sent: Friday, February 1, 2019 3:40 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Flat Black

 

I too used Floquil, and still do while my dwindling supply lasts, but nowadays I mostly use TruColor or Model Master. Model Master comes in two varieties … enamel (oil based) and acrylic (water based).

 

I use acrylics mostly for brush panting small details. For spraying I use TruColor and Model Master enamel (never have had much luck spraying acrylics).

 

For spraying Model Master enamel I thin perhaps 30-50%. If returning the paint to the bottle, I use ONLY their suggested thinner (some kind of "mineral spirits"). If NOT returning the paint to the bottle, I use most any commercial lacquer-thinner.  With the lacquer-thinner, use good ventilation, and preferably a spray booth, the fumes are toxic.

 

I use TruColor with their own thinner (unfortunately, it’s VERY expensive).

 

Use of the lacquer-thinner speeds the drying process. One needs to be careful not to put it on plastic too wet, as it will attack the surface of the plastic (as did the older Floquil and Scalecoat 1). Experience solves this problem.

 

I use the lacquer-thinner for cleaning the airbrush with either paint.

 

The main downsides to Model Master enamel is that it dries slower than Floquil (even when using lacquer-thinner), and does not come in “railroad” colors. Fortunately it does come in many colors, many of them "flat”.

 

I’m finding both TruColor or Model Master to be satisfactory. Both are somewhat different than Floquil, and some practice and experience is needed for best results. I still like Floquil, but it’s becoming harder and harder to find, and there are at least THREE incompatible formulations for it (which can lead to some real disasters).

 

I also use some Scalecoat, both 1 & 2, and it’s “OK”, but it’s abominably slow drying time is a real “pain” … unless it’s BAKED. Baked Scalecoat is my choice for most brass models … it’s near bulletproof. Unfortunately one can’t bake plastic or most wood models (depending on what they’re glued with). Even on brass, one must be careful to remove any little plastic parts (bushings, etc.).

 

Dan Mitchell

==========

On Feb 1, 2019, at 4:57 PM, al_westerfield <westerfieldalfred@...> wrote:

 

Quite  by coincidence, I purchased my first paint bottles today, flat black Model Master.  The hobby shop didn’t stock mrr colors.  I had to give away all my Floqui, the only product I ever used,  when we moved to Tucson.  The moving company wouldn’t carry it.  So I have a few questions.  Is the 2:1 ratio of paint to thinner as recommended on the bottle for air brushing accurate?  What solvent is best for cleaning the air brush?  Freight car content: I’m painting 6 undec Train Miniature hopper cars.  Thanks for any help. – Al Westerfield

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: dale florence via Groups.Io
Sent: Friday, February 1, 2019 2:19 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Flat Black

 

Tim,

 

Time to change.

 

Dale   

 

 

On Friday, February 1, 2019, 4:07:49 PM EST, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote: 

 

 


TruColor for brushing??? Accupaint, TruColor and Star paints can (must) 
be thinned for airbrushing.
The thinner is volatile, and the caps are not 100% airtight, so the 
paint often desiccates in the bottle.
But adding new thinner will restore it.



On 2/1/2019 1:20 PM, Denny Anspach wrote:
> Colleagues, what utility flat black (solvent-based)  are you all using these days?
>
> I do have a cache of Floquil from their last days, and but an apparent late formula change causes them to take 24/48 hours to completely dry. Scalecoat(s) have too much gloss and take too long.  TruColor works but is a mystery (specifically formulated for brushing).  I am not yet looked to ModelMaster.  My 60+ years of work habits are centered around solvent paint finishes that are workable within hours, not days, and I have no desire nor inclination to change.  In this regard, I can be patient with key paint finishes, but am not at all patient with utility projects where I need to paint and move on.
>
> Denny S. Anspach, MD
> Sacramento, CA 95864


-- 
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*



 

<B6068DBBA1BA415985342B1E68E73267.png>

 

 


Re: Throwback Thursday: Westerfield

earlyrail
 

I was early into the resin building field.
Today I have 55 resin cars that are period correct for my 1905 railroad.
In addition I have build about 10 for our local museum for the 1950's period.
That does not include those I built for others back in the Westerfield old grey/green resin days.
Probably 6 PRR XL's and 6 RI gons up on the shelf at the present time.
There have been several other resin manufacturers that have covered the late 1880 to 1910 period other then those usually mentioned here.

Howard Garner



Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Westerfield

Larry Wolohon
 

For what it's worth, I have built at least 30 Westerfield freight cars through the years, some F&C cars & Sunshine models. When I attended the NMRA National Conventions, Al Westerfield was there, giving clinic on Friday, before the Train Show. Al always had a resin freight car kit from the convention's host city, like in 1986, he had the B&A USRA steel boxcar copies. I was always amazed in how much time & effort Al put into his models. I liked his models because they seemed to be rather accurate & how well they went together.

I have switched to O scale 2 rail & have built an F&C NYC USRA steel gondola rebuild, a Southern Car & Foundry CP mini boxcar. I have some other Southern Car & F. models to build.

Larry Wolohon

On February 1, 2019 at 7:23 AM "Gatwood, Elden J SAD " <elden.j.gatwood@...> wrote:


Thanks much for that, Ben!

My first resin kit was the Westy PRR G22. I built it into a late-era MW car in yellow. I did the lettering individually; what a labor of love!

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Benjamin Hom
Sent: Thursday, January 31, 2019 5:00 PM
To: STMFC <main@realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Westerfield

Railroad Model Craftsman, October 1982 issue, ad for the first four offerings from Westerfield.


Ben Hom




Tank Cars: Capitol Refining Company

David
 

Mostly earlier ACF Type 11s with the end cage handrails, but CWRX 284 and the tank in the background are pre-1917 GATC cars. Curiously, none of the tank cars have safety valves or elbows.

David Thompson


Re: Throwback Thursday: Westerfield

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

Over 40 years ago Genesee County Parks started Crossroads Village and Huckleberry Railroad. The railroad's been running ever since. Located near Flint, MI, the railroad is about five miles long, and currently has two operational historic 3’ gauge steam locomotives, a 1920 Baldwin 4-6-0 and a 1903 Baldwin 2-8-2 K-27. We have a great fleet of historic wooden passenger cars. At peak attendance our trains run about 14 cars long … nearly all the locomotives can pull. Railfans come from all over the world to see this operation, which runs about 9 months of every year.

Yet every year we get LOCAL residents, some are railfans or model railroaders, that have NEVER been there before or even heard of it. Go figure.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Feb 1, 2019, at 5:52 PM, Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:

I owned a record store in a university town for 13 years. I frequently heard people say they had no idea there was a record store downtown. They just always went to the mall. It happened a few times every year for thirteen years. 
 
Same thing happened to the hobby shop where I used to buy freight car models and supplies but they only lasted four years in the same busy downtown.
 
Many people aren’t very adventurous.
 
 
Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN
 
 
 
 
 
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of al_westerfield
Sent: Thursday, January 31, 2019 6:10 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Westerfield
 
The first of 29 years of monthly ads.  Believe it or not, I still ran into people at train shows that had never heard of us. – Al Westerfield
 
Sent from Mail for Windows 10
 
From: Benjamin Hom
Sent: Thursday, January 31, 2019 3:00 PM
To: STMFC
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Westerfield
 
Railroad Model Craftsman, October 1982 issue, ad for the first four offerings from Westerfield.
 
 
Ben Hom
 



Re: Throwback Thursday: Westerfield

Eric Hansmann
 

I owned a record store in a university town for 13 years. I frequently heard people say they had no idea there was a record store downtown. They just always went to the mall. It happened a few times every year for thirteen years.

 

Same thing happened to the hobby shop where I used to buy freight car models and supplies but they only lasted four years in the same busy downtown.

 

Many people aren’t very adventurous.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of al_westerfield
Sent: Thursday, January 31, 2019 6:10 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Westerfield

 

The first of 29 years of monthly ads.  Believe it or not, I still ran into people at train shows that had never heard of us. – Al Westerfield

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Benjamin Hom
Sent: Thursday, January 31, 2019 3:00 PM
To: STMFC
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Westerfield

 

Railroad Model Craftsman, October 1982 issue, ad for the first four offerings from Westerfield.

 

 

Ben Hom

 


Re: Flat Black

Tim O'Connor
 

Al

Model Master solvent based paint, yes, or is this an acrylic?

That sounds correct to me... adding about 1 part thinner to 2 parts paint sounds right. You
can start with less thinner and then add more until the flow is right for you and your airbrush,
PSI pressure, elevation, ambient temperature, and humidity. :-)

Tim O'Connor



On 2/1/2019 4:57 PM, al_westerfield wrote:

Quite  by coincidence, I purchased my first paint bottles today, flat black Model Master.  The hobby shop didn’t stock mrr colors.  I had to give away all my Floqui, the only product I ever used,  when we moved to Tucson.  The moving company wouldn’t carry it.  So I have a few questions.  Is the 2:1 ratio of paint to thinner as recommended on the bottle for air brushing accurate?  What solvent is best for cleaning the air brush?  Freight car content: I’m painting 6 undec Train Miniature hopper cars.  Thanks for any help. – Al Westerfield




--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts