Date   

Off topic question

Clark Propst
 

Sorry to ask about something past the target date of this group, but know Lloyd Keyser is a member and he might be able to answer my question off line?
The attached car was built in the 40s and re-worked at some point. Lloyd has a similar car in the CNW color book, 37000 series. I remember these cars at work, a friend wants to model one, but we don't know what the ends or roof are nor the width of the door.

Sorry and thanks,
CW Propst
 


Re: Perishable Waybills: Always Pink?

Mat Thompson
 

Interesting thread – were other colors common for other types of loads such as loaded stock cars?

 

Mat Thompson

 

See the Oregon Coast Railroad

 

 


Re: Perishable Waybills: Always Pink?

Tony Thompson
 

My understanding is that it was only a recommendation. I have seen an IC perishable bill that was white. But I do know that SP and UP used pink, and was told “most roads did.”
Tony Thompson 


On May 17, 2019, at 8:21 AM, Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

One source I reviewed said perishable waybills were pink per the AAR. Was this a requirement or a recommendation?

Did this practice pre-date the AAR?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Perishable Waybills: Always Pink?

Bob Chaparro
 

One source I reviewed said perishable waybills were pink per the AAR. Was this a requirement or a recommendation?

Did this practice pre-date the AAR?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


PRR gondola conversion

Eric Hansmann
 

Bob McGlone converts a Bowser GS gondola to one with drop doors in the latest DeignBuildOp blog post.

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/2019/05/17/updating-a-bowser-gs-gondola/



Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN


Re: End Door Boxcar Meets Its End

Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

     Thanks for the info on the CB&Q Wedron, Ill "derailment" fellows. Give that American - LaFrance's chief facility was
in Elmira, NY during that period it is most likely that the CV 40 ft. autobox was convenient to use and that the new fire
truck was being delivered to some town on the Fox Valley Branch, though this is all conjecture on my part based on my
part based upon what has been learned/found.

Cordially, Don Valentine


Re: End Door Boxcar Meets Its End

mopacfirst
 

Google is your friend:



However, I have nothing to do with Facebook so I'll remain blissfully ignorant.

Ron Merrick


Re: End Door Boxcar Meets Its End

William Hirt
 

Wedron, Illinois, was on the CB&Q Fox Valley Branch which ran from Montgomery, Illinois, just south of Aurora, to Streator, Illinois. High grade fine silica sand was and continues to be the main commodity shipped off the branch. Also in the image is a damaged CB&Q hopper in light gray and chinese red lettering. That would suggest 1960+ for the derailment.

Bill Hirt

On 5/16/2019 6:11 AM, Donald B. Valentine via Groups.Io wrote:
Given that this is a CV single sheathed, end door boxcar, Bob, I'd be interested in any details 
offered with the photo. Can't help but wonder whose new fire truck wasn't delivered as expected.

Cordially, Don Valentine


Re: End Door Boxcar Meets Its End

Bob Chaparro
 

There were no other details accompanying the photo, unfortunately.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: End Door Boxcar Meets Its End

Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

Given that this is a CV single sheathed, end door boxcar, Bob, I'd be interested in any details 
offered with the photo. Can't help but wonder whose new fire truck wasn't delivered as expected.

Cordially, Don Valentine


End Door Boxcar Meets Its End

Bob Chaparro
 

This image is from the Facebook group, Railroad Images of Bygone Days.

The location is Wedron, Illinois.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Photos: Wabash

Jack Mullen
 

On Wed, May 15, 2019 at 08:48 AM, Bruce Smith wrote:
a dirigible is any lighter-than-air craft that is powered and steerable
Bruce, thanks for pointing that out and perhaps steering this discussion back on course. 

Barrage balloons used hydrogen as the lifting gas. The two Army helium cars would have served the Army's rather small blimp program, which was discontinued in the late '30s. The larger pool of Navy cars was initially needed to supply the huge rigid airships in the '20s and early '30s, and then expanded with the rapid growth of the blimp fleet in WW2.

I'd love to have a helium car model, but there's no reason I can find for one to be on the C&NW in northern Illinois. Guess I'll stick with pickle cars for oddballs. 

Jack Mullen


Re: Grand Trunk Western SS Double Door Box Car 585034

Lester Breuer
 

My post did not take the blog correctly.  Please use the following:

http://mnrailroadcab100.blogspot.com/

Lester Breuer


Grand Trunk Western SS Double Door Box Car 585034

Lester Breuer
 

I have finished F&C resin flat kit of Grand Trunk Western SS Double Door Box Car 585034 with scratch built Hutchins roof. I have posted photos and writeup of build, details added, paintining, lettering including making waterslide chalk marks decals and weathering with Pan Pastels. The post also includes photos of GTW. 1 1/2 Doors SS Box Car.  If you would like to take a look please do at the following link:

http://mnrailroadcab100.blogspot.com

Lester Breuer


Re: Photos: Wabash

Bruce Smith
 

As usual, we digress, but dirigible means airship, NOT necessarily a rigid airship... 


“Airship” and “dirigible” are synonyms; a dirigible is any lighter-than-air craft that is powered and steerable, as opposed to free floating like a balloon."


Thus my original posting was actually correct 😉


Regards,

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL





From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of BRIAN PAUL EHNI <bpehni@...>
Sent: Tuesday, May 14, 2019 11:27 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photos: Wabash
 
The key word is dirigible, as opposed to blimp. The Hindenburg was a dirigible (as were the US Navy Akron, Macon, and Shenandoah.)

Blimps have no internal framework. Nor do barrage balloons. 

Thanks!
Brian Ehni 
(Sent from my iPhone)

On May 14, 2019, at 10:16 PM, Ray Breyer via Groups.Io <rtbsvrr69@...> wrote:

>>The US Army did not have dirigibles, only the US Navy.
>>Jim Gates

Definitely not true.


Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL


Re: Photos: Wabash

BRIAN PAUL EHNI
 

The key word is dirigible, as opposed to blimp. The Hindenburg was a dirigible (as were the US Navy Akron, Macon, and Shenandoah.)

Blimps have no internal framework. Nor do barrage balloons. 

Thanks!
Brian Ehni 
(Sent from my iPhone)

On May 14, 2019, at 10:16 PM, Ray Breyer via Groups.Io <rtbsvrr69@...> wrote:

>>The US Army did not have dirigibles, only the US Navy.
>>Jim Gates

Definitely not true.


Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL


Re: Photos: Wabash

BRIAN PAUL EHNI
 

They had plenty of barrage balloons though.

Thanks!
Brian Ehni
(Sent from my iPhone)

On May 14, 2019, at 10:13 PM, Jim Gates via Groups.Io <jim.gates=ymail.com@groups.io> wrote:

The US Army did not have dirigibles, only the US Navy.

Jim Gates
--------------------------------------------
On Tue, 5/14/19, Bruce Smith <smithbf@auburn.edu> wrote:

Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photos: Wabash
To: "main@RealSTMFC.groups.io" <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Tuesday, May 14, 2019, 7:43 AM

And the big one… the mostest obvious one… and the one confirmed by the lettering on the Helium car “US ARMY AIR
SERVICE”… The burgeoning US dirigible fleet. We’ve discussed these helium cars here before. They were built in
part to deal with the needs of the rigid, lighter-than-air, airship fleet.

Regards
Bruce



Re: Photos: Wabash

Tim O'Connor
 


proving again that once a bureaucracy gets hold of a project it's hard to pry away from them again

On 5/14/2019 11:16 PM, Ray Breyer via Groups.Io wrote:
>>The US Army did not have dirigibles, only the US Navy.
>>Jim Gates

Definitely not true.


Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Photos: Wabash

Bruce Smith
 

Technically correct, but they did have at least one semi-rigid airship and many blimps.


Regards

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL





From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Jim Gates via Groups.Io <jim.gates@...>
Sent: Tuesday, May 14, 2019 10:13 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photos: Wabash
 
The US Army did not have dirigibles, only the US Navy.

Jim Gates
--------------------------------------------
On Tue, 5/14/19, Bruce Smith <smithbf@...> wrote:

 Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photos: Wabash
 To: "main@RealSTMFC.groups.io" <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
 Date: Tuesday, May 14, 2019, 7:43 AM
 
 And the big one… the mostest obvious one… and the one confirmed by the lettering on the Helium car “US ARMY AIR
 SERVICE”…  The burgeoning US dirigible fleet. We’ve discussed these helium cars here before. They were built in
 part to deal with the needs of the  rigid, lighter-than-air, airship fleet.
 
 Regards
 Bruce




Re: Photos: Wabash

Ray Breyer
 

>>The US Army did not have dirigibles, only the US Navy.
>>Jim Gates

Definitely not true.


Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL

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