Date   

Re: Perishable Waybills: Always Pink? (Preferred Movement Waybill)

Bob Chaparro
 

Preferred Movement Waybill

This text below is from the Station Agent's Blue Book: A Practical Reference Book for those Actively Engaged in Station Work by Otto Bernard.Kirkpatrick, Kirkpatrick Publishing Company, 1928.

Link: https://tinyurl.com/yyr4xhpv

Individual pages from this book may be download as text.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

++++

Preferred Movement Waybill. The "Freight Waybill—Preferred Movement" is the form of waybill recommended by the Railway Accounting Officers Association, and it is used by most carriers in waybilling perishable shipments. It is printed on pink paper, and while as to form it is exactly like the ordinary freight waybill, its distinctive color, and the preferred-movement notation, indicates that the shipment should receive prompt and special attention. 601. Some carriers whose requirements are not large do not provide a special form of preferred-movement waybill, but use the ordinary freight waybill for perishable shipments and indorse it "Perishable" or some equally appropriate symbol to call special attention to the  importance of the shipment covered.


Re: MILW & NP log trains

brianleppert@att.net
 

In addition to Gene Deimling's post on skeleton log cars, here are two more images.  Photographed in Olympia. WA circa early 1950s.

Brian Leppert
Carson City, NV


NERPM Clinic schedule posted

Dave Owens
 

The New England Prototype Meet is less than two weeks away. It is
Friday, May 31 and Saturday, June 1. There is a program Thursday night
for early arrivers and about a dozen layout open houses on Sunday.
Barry Cone will again open his train wonderland to meet attendees.

Today we posted on our website, www.nerpm.org, a tentative schedule
with full clinic descriptions. Please note the hands-on clinics.

Here is a direct link to the schedule:
http://nerpm.org/uploads/7/0/2/0/70207725/2019_nerpm_tentative_clinic_list.pdf

You can register online until 5 p.m. Tuesday, or at the door.

The meet is at the Farmington Marriott, 15 Farm Springs Road, Farmington, Conn.

If you need additional information, please contact me at neprotomeet@gmail.com.

Thank you again,
Dave Owens


Re: Mystery Load

Richard Brennan
 

...not the load, but the car is:
SP 143093, Class F-70-10, SP Sacramento-built 1954, all-welded
(Ref: Southern Pacific Freight Cars Vol 3, Tony Thompson)

--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------

At 03:23 PM 5/19/2019, Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io wrote:
I have only a vague idea about what is this load on SP flat car 143093:
<https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth37272/m1/1/?q=southern%20pacific>;https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth37272/m1/1/?q=southern%20pacific
Does anyone know with certainty what the load is?

Thanks.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: Unloading Airplane Engines

Richard Brennan
 

The car being loaded:
SP 63084, Class A-50-4, SSC-built 1921;
rebuilt with wider doors and steel ends circa-1938, type XAR.
(Ref: Southern Pacific Freight Cars Vol 3, Tony Thompson)

--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------

On May 20, 2019, at 12:58 PM, Bob Chaparro wrote:
An undated photo. Note the packaging of the propellers.
https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth41072/?q=railroad
Perhaps one of our airplane experts can tell us what kind of engines these are.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: Early Southern Pacific Fruit Cars

Tony Thompson
 

Bob Chaparro wrote:

These photos are from the Jeff Stein Collection. He wrote, "These four SP “reefers” we’re built by the Ensign Manufacturing Co. of Huntington, West Virginia, in the late 1800s.
The Ensign Manufacturing Co. eventually became the American Car and Foundry Co. (ACF), which is still building railcars today."
https://tinyurl.com/yyq69r22 (Morgan's Louisiana & Texas R.R.)

   Only two of them are refrigerators. The other two are ventilated fruit cars, of which the SP system had hundreds. These are good photos, different from the views of these car types in my Volume 4 on Southern Pacific Box Cars.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Early Southern Pacific Fruit Cars

Bob Chaparro
 

These photos are from the Jeff Stein Collection. He wrote, "These four SP “reefers” we’re built by the Ensign Manufacturing Co. of Huntington, West Virginia, in the late 1800s.

The Ensign Manufacturing Co. eventually became the American Car and Foundry Co. (ACF), which is still building railcars today."

https://tinyurl.com/y4o8yf2j

https://tinyurl.com/y6x2y9j4

https://tinyurl.com/y5xl5n4f

https://tinyurl.com/yyq69r22 (Morgan's Louisiana & Texas R.R.)

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Unloading Airplane Engines

Jim Ogden
 


Re: UP series 10300 to 12499

Richard Townsend
 

I just sent a response to Tony's comment, which I sent before I saw Jeff's response. I apologize if I appear to have been piling on.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Tony Thompson <tony@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Wed, May 22, 2019 11:39 am
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] UP series 10300 to 12499

Jeff Aley wrote:

               It’s not odd when taken in context.
               The models shown are in a post-1960 paint scheme.
               The models do not show OWR&N lettering.  The original poster asked if this was an error for this particular paint scheme.
               Rich’s comment is that he doesn’t believe the OWR&N reporting mark would have been on the car in the post-1960 scheme.  He also was careful to point out that 1960 is “in the future” from the perspective of STMFC.

  Thank you for the clarification. I clearly mis-read what he wrote.       

Tony Thompson




Re: UP series 10300 to 12499

Richard Townsend
 

Not that odd since I was talking about the mid 1960s, not 1940. That's 25 years later. My ORERs only go up to 1959, at which time the OWR&N marks were still in use, but they were diminishing. I was speculating that by 1965 the usage might have ended. I assume a UP expert, which I am not, might know. I understand that the OWR&N was absorbed by the UP around 1936.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Tony Thompson <tony@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Wed, May 22, 2019 11:08 am
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] UP series 10300 to 12499

Richard Townsend  wrote:

It’s hard to predict the future but I don’t think the OWR&N lettering will be used in the mid 1960s.

     Odd comment. My 1940 ORER, for example, shows OWR&N.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: UP series 10300 to 12499

Tim O'Connor
 


The UP B-50-24 and B-50-27 classes (including OWR&N and OSL) are noted as actively being
relettered in the 1963 ORER i.e. it was not yet completed by that time.

A good chance to reletter them came in 1962-1963 when the GRL (LD LMT + LT WT) numbers
for ALL freight cars had to be updated.

Tim O'Connor



On 5/22/2019 10:08 AM, Richard Townsend via Groups.Io wrote:
It’s hard to predict the future but I don’t think the OWR&N lettering will be used in the mid 1960s.


On May 22, 2019, at 12:09 AM, Aley, Jeff A <Jeff.A.Aley@...> wrote:

The cars are lettered as class B-50-41.  The prototype B-50-41 was a 1944 AAR box car with R/3/4 Early Improved Dreadnaught ends, and a diagonal panel roof.  These cars also had Alternating Center Rivets, which the model certainly does not have (few models do).  One could add them using Archer rivets, or one could do as I do and INTEND to add the Archer rivets someday… J

 

The number series for the B-50-41 in 1951 was 101600 – 105099, so these models fit that number series.

 

Regards,

 

-Jeff



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: UP series 10300 to 12499

Tony Thompson
 

Jeff Aley wrote:

               It’s not odd when taken in context.
               The models shown are in a post-1960 paint scheme.
               The models do not show OWR&N lettering.  The original poster asked if this was an error for this particular paint scheme.
               Rich’s comment is that he doesn’t believe the OWR&N reporting mark would have been on the car in the post-1960 scheme.  He also was careful to point out that 1960 is “in the future” from the perspective of STMFC.

  Thank you for the clarification. I clearly mis-read what he wrote.       

Tony Thompson




Re: UP series 10300 to 12499

Aley, Jeff A
 

Tony,

 

               It’s not odd when taken in context.

               The models shown are in a post-1960 paint scheme.

               The models do not show OWR&N lettering.  The original poster asked if this was an error for this particular paint scheme.

               Rich’s comment is that he doesn’t believe the OWR&N reporting mark would have been on the car in the post-1960 scheme.  He also was careful to point out that 1960 is “in the future” from the perspective of STMFC.

 

Regards,

 

-Jeff

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tony Thompson
Sent: Wednesday, May 22, 2019 11:08 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] UP series 10300 to 12499

 

Richard Townsend  wrote:



It’s hard to predict the future but I don’t think the OWR&N lettering will be used in the mid 1960s.

 

     Odd comment. My 1940 ORER, for example, shows OWR&N.

 

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA

2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com

(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...

Publishers of books on railroad history

 

 



 


Re: hi tech HO air hoses

Tony Thompson
 

Jon Miller wrote:

    Like I said, more than several, like lots and lots.  Sticky glue belongs in this same family.  They all appear to be variations on PVA glues!

    Polyvinyl acetate is in lots of glues, as Jon says, but they range very widely, including regular "white glue" and many other products of quite different behaviors, so I am not sure that saying "PVA" tells us much of value about a glue.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: hi tech HO air hoses

Tony Thompson
 

Dan Mitchell wrote:

I have tried “canopy glue” with poor results … unfortunately the term “canopy glue” covers several products from various manufacturers, and they are NOT all the same product. What I have found is very similar to Microscale’s “Crystal clear”, which is just white glue formulated to be clear when dry … it does not stick very well to much of anything (that’s not its purpose).

   I strongly disagree. I too have experimented with various products of the "white glue" family, and canopy glue is NOT, repeat NOT, just like any others, including Crystal Clear. Canopy glue is in fact a tenacious adhesive, and is excellent for bonding dissimilar materials, such as wood to plastic, or plastic to metal, etc. And it has the great advantage in some situations that it remains flexible.
     Let me mention one more time my blog post on the topic, which contains some additional detail:

https://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2013/05/a-few-words-in-praise-of-canopy-glue.html

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: MILW & NP log trains

Gene Deimling
 

I might be able to help with some information on NP log cars that were used on branches on the set side of Washington.  I am posting a plan for skeleton cars rebuilt from from steel underframe trussrod boxcars.  The railroad recycled lots of cars to haul logs.  

--
Gene Deimling
El Dorado Hills, CA


Re: UP series 10300 to 12499

Tony Thompson
 

Richard Townsend  wrote:

It’s hard to predict the future but I don’t think the OWR&N lettering will be used in the mid 1960s.

     Odd comment. My 1940 ORER, for example, shows OWR&N.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: hi tech HO air hoses

Jon Miller
 

On 5/22/2019 8:57 AM, Nelson Moyer wrote:
unfortunately the term “canopy glue” covers several products from various manufacturers, and they are NOT all the same product

    Like I said, more than several, like lots and lots.  Sticky glue belongs in this same family.  They all appear to be variations on PVA glues!

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, 
SPROG, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: SFRD Rr-46 B end photo.

Bob Chaparro
 

Two Paul Brown photos.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: Smoke Stack Load

Bob Chaparro
 

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