Date   

Re: Unloading Airplane Engines

John Barry
 

Ding, ding , ding Spend is a winner! The photo location is inside AF plant 4 located adjacent to Fort Worth Army Airfield, later Carswell AFB, and now Joint Reserve Base Fort Worth. The government owned, contractor operated plant was constructed by the Defence Plant Corporation in 1941 and operated by Consolidated Aircraft and it's successors. The main production building is over a mile long. I didn't get to see it ful of B-24s, but I did see it in the 80's with the F-16. A very impressive sight And although the Brewster Buckaneer cowl is similar, their plants were in NY and PA.

John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA


707-490-9696 


PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736

--------------------------------------------

On Mon, 5/20/19, Spen Kellogg <spninetynine@centurylink.net> wrote:

Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Unloading Airplane Engines
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Date: Monday, May 20, 2019, 9:25 PM


On 5/20/2019
11:58 AM, Bob Chaparro via
Groups.Io wrote:



An
undated photo. Note
the packaging of the propellers.
https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth41072/?q=railroad
Perhaps
one of our
airplane experts can tell us what kind of engines
these are.



Bob,



The look like Pratt and Whitney Twin Wasp radial engines
for the
Consolidated B-24 bomber used extensively in Europe
during the later
part of WWII.



https://www.lockheedmartin.com/en-us/news/features/history/b-24.html



Scroll down on this page to see a photo and description
of the
engine mounted on the plane.



http://www.aviation-history.com/consolidated/b24.html



I am making an educated guess. since the photo is
credited to
Lockheed Martin, Fort Worth, Texas. Consolidated was
absorbed into
Lockheed and the B-24 was built in Fort Worth, among
several other
locations. The oval shape of the nacelle was evocative
of the B-24.
The propellers are clearly three bladed. I would guess
that the
photo was taken in 1943.



Spen Kellogg


Re: Early Version Of Auto-Train?

Brent Greer
 

That Florida East Coast flatcar sure is far from home ! (Unless perhaps the destination "vacation site" is sunny Florida - perhaps even across the overseas railway to Key West)

Never the less, now I have a new FEC flatcar I will have to try to model...

Brent
________________________________
Dr. J. Brent Greer


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io <chiefbobbb@...>
Sent: Monday, May 20, 2019 2:14:17 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Early Version Of Auto-Train?
 

Early Version Of Auto-Train?

https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth36627/?q=railroad

Caption: Photograph of a touring car being transported on a railroad car from Orange, Texas to a vacation site. The owner is probably Lutcher Stark, taken in 1914.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Unloading Airplane Engines

Spen Kellogg <spninetynine@...>
 

On 5/20/2019 11:58 AM, Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io wrote:

An undated photo. Note the packaging of the propellers.

https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth41072/?q=railroad

Perhaps one of our airplane experts can tell us what kind of engines these are.


Bob,

The look like Pratt and Whitney Twin Wasp radial engines for the Consolidated B-24 bomber used extensively in Europe during the later part of WWII.

https://www.lockheedmartin.com/en-us/news/features/history/b-24.html

Scroll down on this page to see a photo and description of the engine mounted on the plane.

http://www.aviation-history.com/consolidated/b24.html

I am making an educated guess. since the photo is credited to Lockheed Martin, Fort Worth, Texas. Consolidated was absorbed into Lockheed and the B-24 was built in Fort Worth, among several other locations. The oval shape of the nacelle was evocative of the B-24. The propellers are clearly three bladed. I would guess that the photo was taken in 1943.

Spen Kellogg


Re: Unloading Airplane Engines

 

At a guess, B24. They had an elliptical shape due to the crescent openings on each side 

Thanks!
Brian Ehni 
(Sent from my iPhone)

On May 20, 2019, at 12:58 PM, Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

An undated photo. Note the packaging of the propellers.

https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth41072/?q=railroad

Perhaps one of our airplane experts can tell us what kind of engines these are.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Unloading Airplane Engines

Jesus Pe�a
 

Pardon the clumsy link, but I believe these are B-24 nacelle/engine assemblies. Note the air intakes on the “cheeks” of the nacelle and also the cutout for the airfoil. Also the B-24’s were produced in Fort Worth Texas. Compare the assemblies in Bob’s photo to the nacelles shown in the link. The picture shows the assembly line in Fort Worth. 
In response to Bruce Smith concern of the Turbochargers. Some variants of the B24 has Superchargers if I recall correctly. I am away from my reference materials 

Hope this helps

Jesus Peña 
Concord, California 
https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/2d/B-24_Liberator_Consolidated-Vultee_Plant%252C_Fort_Worth_Texas.jpg&imgrefurl=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:B-24_Liberator_Consolidated-Vultee_Plant,_Fort_Worth_Texas.jpg&tbnid=6UwsZqdnFaR26M&vet=1&docid=zPq1dLBsWoqSaM&w=860&h=665&hl=en&source=sh/x/im 





On Monday, May 20, 2019, 11:06 AM, Bruce Smith <smithbf@...> wrote:

My initial response was Pratt and Whitney R-1830 for the B-24. The B-24 also had a 3 bladed prop. I’m concerned however because I don’t really see the prominent supercharger that the B-24. The wing cutouts on the engines also look appropriate for the B-24.

Regards
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

On May 20, 2019, at 12:58 PM, Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

An undated photo. Note the packaging of the propellers.
Perhaps one of our airplane experts can tell us what kind of engines these are.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


--
Jesus Peña
Concord,California


Smoke Stack Load

Bob Chaparro
 

It appears that the middle flat car is only a spacer. The caption writer didn't know what a brake wheel was.

https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth427020/m1/1/?q=railroad

Caption:

Photograph of a smokestack built for the Magnolia Petroleum Company. The unit was built and installed by Alcorn Combustion Company out of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, using materials provided by John Dollinger Jr., Inc. The photograph shows the stack laid on a flatbed train for transportation to final location. Two men are at the bottom right adjusting valves at the end of the rail car. The train has stopped within a railroad crossing and two automobiles are waiting to the right. Houses and buildings are in the background. The back of the photo is stamped "BM Photograph Business Men's Studio Beaumont, Texas"

Location is on the Santa Fe Railway.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Unloading Airplane Engines

Benjamin Hom
 

Bob Chaparro wrote:
"An undated photo. Note the packaging of the propellers.
Perhaps one of our airplane experts can tell us what kind of engines these are."

Cowlings are consistent with the Brewster SB2A Buccaneer (note the symmetrical intakes), which would make the engines Wright R-2600 radial engines.


Ben Hom


Early Version Of Auto-Train?

Bob Chaparro
 

Early Version Of Auto-Train?

https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth36627/?q=railroad

Caption: Photograph of a touring car being transported on a railroad car from Orange, Texas to a vacation site. The owner is probably Lutcher Stark, taken in 1914.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Unloading Airplane Engines

Bruce Smith
 

My initial response was Pratt and Whitney R-1830 for the B-24. The B-24 also had a 3 bladed prop. I’m concerned however because I don’t really see the prominent supercharger that the B-24. The wing cutouts on the engines also look appropriate for the B-24.

Regards
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

On May 20, 2019, at 12:58 PM, Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

An undated photo. Note the packaging of the propellers.
Perhaps one of our airplane experts can tell us what kind of engines these are.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Unloading Airplane Engines

Bob Chaparro
 

An undated photo. Note the packaging of the propellers.

https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth41072/?q=railroad

Perhaps one of our airplane experts can tell us what kind of engines these are.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Image of SWIFT TANK LINE tank cars

Todd Sullivan
 

It looks like the photo was taken at the Fort Worth stock yards, judging from the structures and the hill behind them.  The area is now a tourist attraction, and they have saved a number of the stock pens and associated structures, but not the meat processing buildings owned by Swift, Armour and others.  Pretty interesting place to visit.

Todd Sullivan
(who is moving to the Dallas area this week)


Re: Off topic question

Jack Mullen
 

On Mon, May 20, 2019 at 07:06 AM, Clark Propst wrote:
One time I've always wondered about is why a 50' car with only a 6' door?
Because C&NW figured that anything that could be loaded thru a 6' door into a 40' car would fit thru the same size door in a 50' car. That's a smart*** way of saying that door size is driven by  nature of the freight, and how it's loaded.

These cars were intended for merchandise, not lumber, machinery, autos or other large stuff. The 50' length provided more volume for relatively low-density package freight. In 1940, manually loading using hand trucks would be the norm. So a six foot door would suffice. A larger door opening would impose some additional structural cost. 
Post-WW2, palletization and forklifts changed the rules of the game, hence later cars had bigger doors,  and these ones got the homebrew door mod.

Jack Mullen


Re: Photo: SFRD Reefers - Shipping lettuce at Aquila, Arizona, 1959

dave w
 

On Mon, May 20, 2019 at 06:42 AM, Bob Chaparro wrote:
a Class Rr-39 reefer. This is one of 170 cars rebuilt circa 1945-46 from Class Rr-2, -3 and -4 reefers.
In pristine new paint within 10 years of rebuild too?
Of equal interest perhaps are the 'ring ins' from ART and MDT?
regards davew


Re: Image of SWIFT TANK LINE tank cars

Steve and Barb Hile
 

At least some of these were built by Bettendorf.  See the files section at
 
 
Steve Hile



From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Monday, May 20, 2019 10:13 AM
To: STMFC
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Image of SWIFT TANK LINE tank cars

Hi List Members,
 
Image of SWIFT TANK LINE tank cars. They appear to be built with trussrod and end bulkheads.
 
Also, there are box or stock cars lettered for SA&AP in the distance
 
 
Claus Schlund
 
 


Re: Mystery Load

Bob Chaparro
 

Great find. It is amazing what the body of members here can find.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: Off topic question

Tom Madden
 

On Mon, May 20, 2019 at 08:18 AM, O Fenton Wells wrote:
Clark call me crazy but the 50 ft car looks like it has a home made 8 ft. door, standard 6' door plus 2 ft section welded on to it. 
Yes. The upper door hangers are only on the 6' door but the lower guides are spaced for the 8' mash-up door. And look at the length of the door tracks.

Tom Madden
 


Image of SWIFT TANK LINE tank cars

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
Image of SWIFT TANK LINE tank cars. They appear to be built with trussrod and end bulkheads.
 
Also, there are box or stock cars lettered for SA&AP in the distance
 
 
Claus Schlund
 
 


Another Photo: Pierce Fordyce Oil Association Tank Cars

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


Hi Bob and List Members,
 
There is another view of tank cars marked for Pierce Fordyce Oil Association at ther link below...
 
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, May 19, 2019 11:47 PM
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Pierce Fordyce Oil Association Tank Cars

Undated photo of tank cars marked for Pierce Fordyce Oil Association.

https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38171/m1/1/?q=railroad

Description: Photograph of two oil tanker cars belonging to Pierce Fordyce Oil Association in Fort Worth, Texas sit on railroad tracks. A loading rack with steel beams on it stands between the cars.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Mystery Load

Wayne
 

Jerry, I don't know what Lithium Stearate Grease is but it looks as if you nailed it. Good Work!

Wayne


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Off topic question

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Clark;

Or ever better, see attached.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Monday, May 20, 2019 10:56 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Off topic question

On Mon, May 20, 2019 at 07:06 AM, Clark Propst wrote:


One time I've always wondered about is why a 50' car with only a 6' door?
CW Propst

I don't know for sure, but I would imagine merchandise. It seems around 1940 there were a whole bunch of roads ordering 50 ton 50 foot cars with 6' doors, in my neck of the woods C&NW, MILW, and Soo Line all had small groups that were not repeated. They would be ideal for LCL service, and could easily be converted to express boxes should the need arise. The coming of WWII seemed to change whatever the thinking was, and the orders were not repeated after the war. The Soo also rebuilt their cars with eight foot doors; the door opening was only expanded to the right, IIRC, leaving the new doors slightly off center.

Dennis Storzek

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