Date   

Re: Off topic question

O Fenton Wells
 

Clark call me crazy but the 50 ft car looks like it has a home made 8 ft. door, standard 6' door plus 2 ft section welded on to it.  Of course the C&NW would have lost contest points for not putting the proper 8 ft door on the car....I'm certain.  SR did this with some 50 DD cars to get 15 ft openings and I think D&RGW modified some doors as well.  Wasn't pretty but it worked and the cars were at the ends of their lives so don't want to invest heavily in remodels.
Fenton

On Mon, May 20, 2019 at 10:06 AM Clark Propst <cepropst@q.com> wrote:
Thanks for the great information guys! These cars were in bagged cement service mostly between the plant in Mason City and satellite facilities, mainly in the Burnsville - Twin Cities. 
A very interesting project for sure. One time I've always wondered about is why a 50' car with only a 6' door?
CW Propst



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Re: Off topic question

Clark Propst
 

Thanks for the great information guys! These cars were in bagged cement service mostly between the plant in Mason City and satellite facilities, mainly in the Burnsville - Twin Cities. 
A very interesting project for sure. One time I've always wondered about is why a 50' car with only a 6' door?
CW Propst


Re: Mystery Load

Jerome (Jerry) Albin
 

Looks to be a Stratco contactor  used to make lithium stearate grease base. Regards...Jerry Albin



     


Re: Photo: SFRD Reefers - Shipping lettuce at Aquila, Arizona, 1959

Bob Chaparro
 

A good information from Paul B:
But this is a rebuilt Rr-39 with plug doors and reversed ice hatches.  Re-weigh date is WC 4 59.


Photo: Pierce Fordyce Oil Association Tank Cars

Bob Chaparro
 

Undated photo of tank cars marked for Pierce Fordyce Oil Association.

https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38171/m1/1/?q=railroad

Description: Photograph of two oil tanker cars belonging to Pierce Fordyce Oil Association in Fort Worth, Texas sit on railroad tracks. A loading rack with steel beams on it stands between the cars.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Mystery Load

Jack Mullen
 

Gee, Bob, it's right in the full description on the site: "large cone-shaped object".

Seriously, it appears to be a vessel for storing and dispensing powdered or fine granular material, probably with some pneumatic means.

I disclaim expertise and certainty.

Jack Mullen


Re: FINISHING AMB LAZER FLAT FAR DECKS

Tony Thompson
 

I don’t stain because the less seen of the grain the better. Just paint with an acrylic mix to suit the age of your deck.
Tony Thompson 


On May 19, 2019, at 1:59 PM, Bruce Smith <smithbf@...> wrote:

Bill,


Interesting. I have stained many of them using a variety of techniques. Most commonly I use leather dye diluted in isopropyl alcohol. I also use acrylic paints, also diluted in alcohol. Some time there are areas that are more resistant than others, I think due to natural variations in the wood used. I just leave more stain on those areas, longer. If it truly resists staining I would suggest opening the grain with some heavier grain sandpaper, such as 200 or even 120 grit, or even raising the grain a bit with a quick exposure to water. Test and apply more heavily if needed.


Regards,

Bruce Smith

Currently situated at "MDT", which is the really cool airport code for Harrisburg (Pa) International 😉




From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of WILLIAM PARDIE <PARDIEW001@...>
Sent: Sunday, May 19, 2019 2:27 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] FINISHING AMB LAZER FLAT FAR DECKS
 
Could anyone share their techniques for finishing AMB flat car decks? They seem to resist staining.

Thanks in advance.

Bill Pardie



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Re: Photo: SFRD Reefers - Shipping lettuce at Aquila, Arizona, 1959

Bob Chaparro
 

I didn't notice the ladder. The ART reefer in the background appears to have its ladder attached the same way.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Mystery Load

Bob Chaparro
 

I have only a vague idea about what is this load on SP flat car 143093:

https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth37272/m1/1/?q=southern%20pacific

Does anyone know with certainty what the load is?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: FINISHING AMB LAZER FLAT FAR DECKS

Bruce Smith
 

Bill,


Interesting. I have stained many of them using a variety of techniques. Most commonly I use leather dye diluted in isopropyl alcohol. I also use acrylic paints, also diluted in alcohol. Some time there are areas that are more resistant than others, I think due to natural variations in the wood used. I just leave more stain on those areas, longer. If it truly resists staining I would suggest opening the grain with some heavier grain sandpaper, such as 200 or even 120 grit, or even raising the grain a bit with a quick exposure to water. Test and apply more heavily if needed.


Regards,

Bruce Smith

Currently situated at "MDT", which is the really cool airport code for Harrisburg (Pa) International 😉




From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of WILLIAM PARDIE <PARDIEW001@...>
Sent: Sunday, May 19, 2019 2:27 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] FINISHING AMB LAZER FLAT FAR DECKS
 
Could anyone share their techniques for finishing AMB flat car decks? They seem to resist staining.

Thanks in advance.

Bill Pardie



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


FINISHING AMB LAZER FLAT FAR DECKS

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

Could anyone share their techniques for finishing AMB flat car decks? They seem to resist staining.

Thanks in advance.

Bill Pardie



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Re: Photo: SFRD Reefers - Shipping lettuce at Aquila, Arizona, 1959

gary laakso
 

Great picture Bob, thanks for sharing.  Note the ladder attached to the roof with rivets at the bottom left of the photo.  I am guessing that it is an ART.

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, May 19, 2019 11:43 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: SFRD Reefers - Shipping lettuce at Aquila, Arizona, 1959

 

Good, clear reefer photo. Foreground reefer is SFRD 8002, a Class Rr-39 reefer. This is one of 170 cars rebuilt circa 1945-46 from Class Rr-2, -3 and -4 reefers.

http://images.library.ca.gov/high-res/1992-6363.tif

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: SFRD Reefers - Shipping lettuce at Aquila, Arizona, 1959

Bob Chaparro
 

Good, clear reefer photo. Foreground reefer is SFRD 8002, a Class Rr-39 reefer. This is one of 170 cars rebuilt circa 1945-46 from Class Rr-2, -3 and -4 reefers.

http://images.library.ca.gov/high-res/1992-6363.tif

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Perishable Waybills: Always Pink?

John Barry
 

The Railway Accounting Rules that Guy referenced were updated and reissued as needed, usually annually in the period of our list. It is divided into mandatory and recommendatory accounting rules.  Mandatory forms follow the mandatory rules end recommended forms are found after the recommended rules.  These forms in the rules have the page layout information on them that shows how wide each field is and how tall.

You can trace how the waybill form has evolved by looking at the form pages. Free instance when the single stop this car line became a 3 line field.  And when they added the c o d Block.  Both of which happened after my 1944 era. 

I wrote a post about the evolution of the code numbers on my blog at

http://northbaylines.blogspot.com/2018/04/railway-accounting-codes-revisited.html?m=1



John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA


707-490-9696 


PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736

--------------------------------------------

On Sat, 5/18/19, Guy Wilber via Groups.Io <guycwilber=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Perishable Waybills: Always Pink?
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Date: Saturday, May 18, 2019, 8:45 PM

Bob Chaparro
wrote:

“One source I
reviewed said perishable waybills were pink per the
AAR.
Was this a requirement or a
recommendation?
The pink Perishable Waybill
was a recommendation.


“Did this practice
pre-date the AAR?”


The use of pink was approved by the
Railway Accounting Officers Association In 1921 and the
purpose is covered within:


The RAOA,
formerly the American Railway Accounting Officers changed
their name in September of 1917 (by request of The American
Railway Association).  The Association would later be
absorbed into The Association of American Railroads in
October of 1934.  After that time all forms became AAR
“Standard” or “Recommended”.
Guy WilberReno, Nevada


Re: Off topic question

Jack Mullen
 

Todd, I count 9 bumps in each half, plus an extra wrinkle at the bottom where the end sheet meets the sill.  That wound be a 5/5 Dreadnaught, with 5 major ribs and 4 darts between, in each half. Compare to the 4/5 end on the car to the right, which would show 7 bumps in the upper panel.

Clark, C&NW got a few small lots of 50'6, 10'5" IH boxcars with single 6' doors around 1940. Most of my stuff is still boxed up, so please forgive the fuzziness of working from memory. IIRC, the first lot had 4/5 square corner Dreadnaught ends, Viking roofs, and straight side sills, with a rather small reinforcement near the center. (The car to the right just might be one of these - note the wide flat space at the top of the end which is characteristic of a 4/5 end on a car thats more than 10' IH).

Later cars were similar but with 5/5 ends. I think that's the basis of the car we see here, which was modified with a 9' (I think) door and deeper and longer sill reinforcement. So I'd go with 5/5 Dreadnaught and Viking. You could check an ORER to verify the door opening, but it looks to me like the proportion of the door extension is consistent with 9'.

By the way, the photo is a bit too fuzzy to read the small lettering, but I think the yellow panel left of the door reads WHEN EMPTY RETURN TO AGENT CNWRY MASON CITY IA. Cement would be consistent with the rather extreme weathering.

Jack Mullen

.


Re: Photos: Wabash

Brad Andonian
 

Jerry
Yoder has not made the models

Brad Andonian 




On Saturday, May 18, 2019, 5:40 PM, jerryglow2 <jerryglow@...> wrote:

I did artwork for an O-scale importer for those 3 tube cars years ago. I wonder if he ever produced them.

Jerry Glow


Re: Photos: Wabash

Steve SANDIFER
 

The only 3 tube models I have seen are the laughable Lionel ones. They even had an unloader - like the log dumping unloader.


On Sat, May 18, 2019 at 5:40 PM, jerryglow2
<jerryglow@...> wrote:
I did artwork for an O-scale importer for those 3 tube cars years ago. I wonder if he ever produced them.

Jerry Glow


Re: Photos: Wabash

jerryglow2
 

I did artwork for an O-scale importer for those 3 tube cars years ago. I wonder if he ever produced them.

Jerry Glow


Re: Off topic question

Todd Sullivan
 

Clark,

I'm going to offer my suspicions based on the photo you provided.  If you count the 'bumps' that show on the ends, there are 10 on the lower panel and 8 on the upper panel, which suggests that the end was a 4-5 dreadnaught end.  The roof looks like it has no raised panels and the 'ribs' look like raised carlines (I hope I got the terminology right), which appears to be similar to Yarmouth's Murphy Flat Panel Roof, Part 4238R.

Todd Sullivan. 


Re: Perishable Waybills: Always Pink?

Tony Thompson
 

Guy Wilber may be able to answer. I have not seen any waybills in other colors.
Tony Thompson 


On May 18, 2019, at 6:34 AM, Mat Thompson <ocrr@...> wrote:

Interesting thread – were other colors common for other types of loads such as loaded stock cars?

 

Mat Thompson

 

See the Oregon Coast Railroad

 

 

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