Date   

Re: PS-1

Tim O'Connor <timoconnor@...>
 

Dave Nelson wrote

I said that too. But look at what the took on: Walthers, Front Range too I
think, and IRC. Only the later was serious competition and as I recall from
reviews, the IRC model wasn't that good (I don't have any PS-1's, they're
too late for my era).
Actually, the Intermountain model is quite good, and is half the price. But
it represents only the 1953-1959 era, while Kadee offers two different versions
(not counting door widths) of the 1950-1952 cars, as well as the post 1952 cars.
Kadee also did more doors (getting back to the continuous improvement idea).
In other words, the IRC kit can be improved to equal the Kadee -- but it takes
work and buying the Kadee is easier for most people.

The biggest improvement Intermountain could make across their product line is
to improve their lettering to Kadee, Branchline, or even E&C/LBF, quality. That
alone would greatly increase the appeal of their models, IMO.

I like competition. But I prefer a scorpion against a bug rather than a battle
of two scorpions.
You've been watching reruns of "The Wild Bunch" on TV again?


Re: New Intermountain "Premium" Reefers

thompson@...
 

Tony - I know all too well about the information that arrives the day after
you send something off to be published. On the other hand, this summary of
changes to paint schemes is posted, and hopefully over time it will get
corrected by the readers (including mistakes that I unintentionally added
in.) - John
No problem, John, it was just a "heads up."

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 http://www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroads and on Western history


Re: Demise of the hobby?

John Nehrich <nehrij@...>
 

I still think the 36 foot box car, with steel roof and fishbelly center
sill. To start off with, a corrugated end, like an inward Murphy and an all
wood end. (I'm thinking Accurail quality for more of the mass market, as
the subtle detail variations are so many that only cast resin can do the
craftsman-type cars.) Then there might be a version with a fishbelly side
sill (or just a detail add-on), wood underframe with truss rods with and
without steel center sill, and so on and so on.
MDC almost got it right, but they don't do a metal roof, or a useful
underframe, as the trucks are spaced too far inboard for most. But I like
the way the ends are separate (a carryover from their reefer body).
At one time, every road just about had wood 36 foot box cars. As more
and more reliable steam becomes available, I still think we may see people
choosing older time periods, as the number of people who personally lived
through the late steam era is diminishing. (And steam and the whole world
of railroading was so much more complex.) At one time, there was an
argument about why no one would do the USRA DS box car and yet I think
Accurail has been doing okay with them. And I think, if anything, the USRA
DS box cars were converted to more useful steel rebuilts while many roads
continued to hold on to their 36 foot box cars. Okay, maybe there weren't
many of these cars in real service, but you only have to find a few left on
a roster to justify them to many people. (pickle car syndrome)
- John

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tim O'Connor" <timoconnor@mediaone.net>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Tuesday, October 30, 2001 12:21 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Demise of the hobby?


Dave Nelson wrote

I think there is the exhaustion of prototypes that meet or
exceed the mfgrs own criteria: 6-8 known road names (one of which
apparently
must be Santa Fe), is preferably a boxcar (not just the numbers game in
recreating a fleet but something that has the largest space for a hearld
and
lettering). BL is sitting on the the last car I know of that qualifies.
I don't know about that. For the steam era, perhaps the 1932 box car
is that last candidate for plastic other than the myriad postwar 10'6"
cars. But for post-1960 I can think of numerous prototypes that were
built in significant numbers for many, many owners for which there are
no models, or only poor 30-yr old plastic models, available. And don't
you think a Red Caboose quality X31/X32 family of box cars would do well?
The Bowser is so lame, and the X31/X32's wore many paint schemes (most
of them second or third hand).

I mean, everyone was pretty surprised when Kadee showed up with a PS-1.
But it was so good that is kaboshed the competition. There's always a
place at the table for excellent models.


Timothy O'Connor <timoconnor@mediaone.net>
Sterling, Massachusetts



To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
STMFC-unsubscribe@egroups.com



Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/


Re: Demise of the hobby?

Dave & Libby Nelson <muskoka@...>
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Tim O'Connor [mailto:timoconnor@mediaone.net]
Dave Nelson wrote
I think there is the exhaustion of prototypes that meet or
exceed the mfgrs own criteria....
I don't know about that. For the steam era, perhaps the 1932 box car
is that last candidate for plastic other than the myriad postwar 10'6"
cars.
I suspect the great unwashed would look at it's short height and assume they
were all turn of the century cars gone by the era they model.... That or not
notice anything and fail to understand why they might want to have a couple.
At any rate, if it isn't the 1944 car as I said then it is your point for
the 1932 car. Either way, we're at the bottom of the list if this line of
thinking has merit.

But for post-1960 ....
Were there railroads after 1960? I didn't know that! Where?

And don't
you think a Red Caboose quality X31/X32 family of box cars would do well?
The Bowser is so lame, and the X31/X32's wore many paint schemes (most
of them second or third hand).
Maybe. More risk than being able to cover something not done before.

I mean, everyone was pretty surprised when Kadee showed up with a PS-1.
But it was so good that is kaboshed the competition. There's always a
place at the table for excellent models.
I said that too. But look at what the took on: Walthers, Front Range too I
think, and IRC. Only the later was serious competition and as I recall from
reviews, the IRC model wasn't that good (I don't have any PS-1's, they're
too late for my era). Would you want somebody like Kadee to come out with a
1937 car? 1944 car (well, if BL doesn't, then yes)? Not a lot of advantage
to it for anybody. I think that's why there were lots of 50' cars and
reefers the last few years -- up against Athearn and MDC. I like
competition. But I prefer a scorpion against a bug rather than a battle of
two scorpions.

Dave Nelson


Re: Demise of the hobby?

Jon Miller <atsf@...>
 

For the steam era, perhaps the 1932 box car is that last candidate for
plastic<

Hear, hear!


Jon Miller
AT&SF
For me time has stopped in 1941
Digitrax DCC owner, Chief system
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: Demise of the hobby?

Tim O'Connor <timoconnor@...>
 

Dave Nelson wrote

I think there is the exhaustion of prototypes that meet or
exceed the mfgrs own criteria: 6-8 known road names (one of which apparently
must be Santa Fe), is preferably a boxcar (not just the numbers game in
recreating a fleet but something that has the largest space for a hearld and
lettering). BL is sitting on the the last car I know of that qualifies.
I don't know about that. For the steam era, perhaps the 1932 box car
is that last candidate for plastic other than the myriad postwar 10'6"
cars. But for post-1960 I can think of numerous prototypes that were
built in significant numbers for many, many owners for which there are
no models, or only poor 30-yr old plastic models, available. And don't
you think a Red Caboose quality X31/X32 family of box cars would do well?
The Bowser is so lame, and the X31/X32's wore many paint schemes (most
of them second or third hand).

I mean, everyone was pretty surprised when Kadee showed up with a PS-1.
But it was so good that is kaboshed the competition. There's always a
place at the table for excellent models.


Timothy O'Connor <timoconnor@mediaone.net>
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: New Intermountain "Premium" Reefers

John Nehrich <nehrij@...>
 

Tony - I know all too well about the information that arrives the day after
you send something off to be published. On the other hand, this summary of
changes to paint schemes is posted, and hopefully over time it will get
corrected by the readers (including mistakes that I unintentionally added
in.) - John

----- Original Message -----
From: <thompson@signaturepress.com>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Monday, October 29, 2001 1:55 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] New Intermountain "Premium" Reefers


John Nehrich wrote:
On our web site (http://www.union.rpi.edu/railroad/index.html), I've
already
posted information like this for PFE (gleaned from Tony's articles in
RMC)
on our freight car paint scheme. (I get tired of having to look this
stuff
up and I can't remember all of it.) - John Nehrich
John, my only caution would be that the articles were written well
before
the book research was finished, and there are a few areas where the book
contradicts the articles: in all cases I believe the book is right. So
basing refs. on the articles only may have some dangers.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 http://www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroads and on Western history




To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
STMFC-unsubscribe@egroups.com



Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/


Re: Demise of the hobby?

Dave & Libby Nelson <muskoka@...>
 

-----Original Message-----
But how many already feel like they have what they need?
A good quality model will always attract buyers and competition will knock
off the older, crudely done models. But I think the problem is
multi-faceted: as you have said, too much supply in too short a period, but
to compound that I think there is the exhaustion of prototypes that meet or
exceed the mfgrs own criteria: 6-8 known road names (one of which apparently
must be Santa Fe), is preferably a boxcar (not just the numbers game in
recreating a fleet but something that has the largest space for a hearld and
lettering). BL is sitting on the the last car I know of that qualifies.
Similar position for their heavyweights. What's left is cars that meet one
criteria don't meet the other (e.g., HK ballast hoppers of the late 40's,
Bethlehem 53' gons, etc. or signature cars like the B&O wagontops). There
is also the simple economics of traditional die manufacturing -- resolution
of the above problems might require some technical revolution that makes
dies for plastic as easy to produce as those for resin.



As far as mags go, I have to wonder if supply and demand isn't still at
work. Added to that is the fact that, in part due to the superb product
base, the hobby has seriously fragmented. Those that used to rely
on MR now
may find their needs satisfied by print media dedicated to their own
modeling area. When one adds the historical societies to the print media
available of MR, MM, RMC, RMJ, MRing, RPC, RLN, NGG, is it any
wonder that circulation is dropping?
Competition works. Just doesn't "work" evenly for all participants.

Notice what the web has done to ad size on MR? What eBay has done to their
classifieds? What listservers has done to demand for the printed word?
These are trends that go far beyond current editorial direction. Dunno who
said it, but in business I've heard say: if you're not prepared to eat your
children (i.e., successful products) be prepared for somebody else to do it.
IOW, don't be complacent. We consumers get more choices, often at lower
cost. Ebay and Yahoo are obviously unexpected competators in the hobby.
But 20 years from now both may be widely accepted as the norm, not upstarts,
and hobby shops and picture magazines may be seen as anachronisms left over
from a pre-electronic age. Just like baseball, mom 'n pop dime stores,
pharmacies, and Grit magazine.

Dave Nelson


Demise of the hobby?

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

First, a fact. I have been informed by an extremely reliable source that
Athearn [ Genisus ] is not exiting the development and/or production of frt
cars.

Those far more learned than me have offered comments about the immanent
demise of the hobby. I would, however, offer a slightly different
perspective...possibly driven by my personal experiences. About two or so
yrs ago through the good and free services of Richard Hendrickson, many of
us on various forums helped put together an HO frt car wish list. Many, if
not all, of those wished for cars have been produced although there are
still, of course, frt cars that the hobby needs. Beginning at about the same
time, we began to see the development and production of really nice plastic
steam engines. All the while, various manufacturers were pumping out
literally tons of new and excellent diesel locomotives...many in the
steam/diesel period. Recently we saw the first very nice plastic passenger
cars in plastic...the Walthers Budd cars. So...what's the point?

Supply and demand. When the wish list was developed, I thought...What if all
these cars came out at the same time? Would I be able to get the quantities
I wanted? Taken across the modeling community, would it be able to respond
to consume the supply...if the supply occurred too quickly? For that matter,
what time period are we talking about? And, for that matter, just how many
frt cars would a buyer want anyhow? For those like me...modeling the UP
trunk line across Wyoming....I need everything [ except an N&W hopper ].
But, realistically, where do I put them? The problem is, there are still
needs. To me, the single most needed car is the post WW2 AAR 40 ft box car.
It ran on so many different RRs that it is a natural. So...I'll have to find
more storage room I guess. I have to continue to consume. But how many
already feel like they have what they need? I mean, while it's great...we've
been deluged with stuff.

As far as mags go, I have to wonder if supply and demand isn't still at
work. Added to that is the fact that, in part due to the superb product
base, the hobby has seriously fragmented. Those that used to rely on MR now
may find their needs satisfied by print media dedicated to their own
modeling area. When one adds the historical societies to the print media
available of MR, MM, RMC, RMJ, MRing, RPC, RLN, NGG, is it any wonder that
circulation is dropping? IOW, those that may have subscribed to many if not
all of the above for a time, may have simply discovered that they have no
room to store them...let alone spend serious time with each copy...and,
thus, have cut back. Just theories of course.

Sure hope I can find more storage room before BL gets their Pullmans out the
door.

Mike Brock


Re: News from Naperville

Benjamin Hom <bhom3@...>
 

fwj@mail.fwi.com wrote:

The other kicker is that some of us were told this weeked by someone
prominent in the hobby that Kalmbach plans a major shake up at Model
Railroader. Though Andy will stay, Larson is coming back to take the
helm and make some major changes.


According to a well-placed source of mine, the major shake up is well along. Marty McGuirk and Jeff Wilson will no longer be at Model Railroader. To the skeptical minds among us, this would appear to be a purge of prototype modelers at Kalmbach. Rather unfortunate, because Andy has made a lot of progress there during his tenure.


Ben Hom

P.S. fwj@mail.fwi.com, could you do us the courtesy of signing your posts? Thanks.


Re: News from Naperville

Richard Hendrickson
 

Paul Lacuira wrote:

I can't imagine what direction that Kalmbach is taking MR. There is but one
direction to go, IMHO, down. AS, JW and MM have made a significant
contribution to that magazine. I subscribed just because of the
improvements made by the trio. Before that I purchased only those issues
that had a particular article that I found of interest (usually about once
every three months).

Again the "bottom line" governs. I hope that AS and JW will soon resurface
and share their modeling and literary talents with those who appreciate
scale prototype modeling, not "toy trains".
It's been apparent for some time that Larsen is the "grey eminence" behind
the scenes at MR, and that the staff has been under increasing pressure
because of MR's declining circulation. All of the model RR magazines have
been losing circulation, but MR's losses have been much greater, in
percentage terms, than the others. The reasons for this decline seem
obvious to me. Though the "hard core" are still hanging in there, they get
a year older every year, and the total number of participants in the hobby
has been shrinking as the "dabblers" are lured away by other interests.
The efforts by the magazines and the industry to lure new people into model
railroading have been largely unsuccessful. The recently announced
"world's greatest hobby" recruiting campaign is a desperate attempt to
reverse the attrition, but it is so obviously lacking in definition or
direction that it will almost certainly be a dismal failure. And as MR is
the magazine most model railroaders read if they don't read any others,
it's naturally the one that takes the biggest hit when the dabblers drift
off to other pursuits.

That's my view, but the view of Larsen and others in the Kalmbach hierarchy
is that circulation has declined because MR hasn't pandered enough to the
unwashed masses (my language, not theirs, of course) and has placed too
much emphasis on advanced modeling and prototype fidelity. I think Paul
is right that dumbing down the magazine will drive more serious and
accomplished modelers away, resulting in even further circulation losses,
and will do so without attracting significant numbers of the unwashed
masses, who are too busy watching TV, playing video games, etc. to be
interested in either prototype or model railroading (especially since
prototype railroading has now become as dull as dishwater). Time will tell
who's right. Meanwhile, Andy appears to have been laterally transfered,
though what he'll be doing at Kalmbach isn't clear yet. Jeff Wilson told
me at Naperville that he's free-lancing and is being offered more work than
he can handle, and Marty's presence at InterMountain can only be a good
thing.

Predictions (Nostradamus was a piker): Larsen will turn MR back into "Toy
Trains 'R' Us," Paul and I and a lot of others will bail, circulation will
continue to go into the tank, Tony Koester will eventually get disgusted
and go away (or those at Kalmbach who think he's a liability will take away
his bully pulpit), and at some point the advertisers will figure out that
many of the readers MR has lost are precisely the kind of serious, lifetime
model railroaders who spend way more money on the hobby than the dabblers
and do so year after year. And it's the advertisers whose opinions really
count; circulation doesn't matter a damn except as a measure of the
potential customers the magazine can deliver to its advertisers, and
Kalmbach has been charging inflated ad rates for years on the strength of
their circulation numbers. They could care less whether modelers like the
subscribers to this list read MR, but some of their advertisers care a lot
and their generous contributions to the Kalmbach stockholders' charity fund
may begin to dry up. That's the real bottom line.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


Is The Golden Age Over?

mikefrommontanan
 

Message: 5
Date: Sun, 28 Oct 2001 22:49:25 -0800
From: "Jon Miller" <atsf@inow.com>
Subject: Re: News from Naperville

So Tim, what are you saying--The Golden age is over?

Jon Miller


I don't know about Tim, but as modelers, we have had the best of
times in the last decade in getting everything we could ever ask for (or
almost). To expect that time to continue forever without a break would
be a fine fairy tale, but.....
Expect a lot of projects to be on the back burner for the next
two to three years. Many vendors will merrily sell existing stock, or
stock based on existing tooling, but how many of them will underwrite a
five or ten thousand unit order from China in the meantime is
understandably small. So much for Athearn, Atlas, Kato, and Life Like.
Domestic manufacturers aren't going to rush out to market new car
types, (though I thoroughly expect Accurail to keep turning out odd runs
of cars based on their existing tooling). I hope Branchline can survive
it's parent company, but how well have their sales been, when in effect
they have marketed a series of nearly identical 50' boxcars (from the
perspective of non-freight car modelers)?
Red Caboose has never seemed to rush releases so I wouldn't expect
something new for at least a year.
What truly new and unique items can the manufacturers bring us?
(a modular tank car kit? USRA 7-8 Murphy end clones-hint, hint,
Accurail!) Do we want the promise of new kits and the frustration of
waiting (read Stewart FT's) for darn near forever? There is a tremendous
quantity of stuff out there, and even if they aren't the most accurate
items available, it is a far sight better than what existed only 20 years
(or even 10) ago.
As much as we might wish for more and more, I'd rather be blessed
with what we have than have to go back to the 'good old days' of
upgrading Athearn reefers and living in a world where prototype fidelity
and detail received far less notice than today.
The most effective way we can make sure manufacturers take an
interest in marketing new products is to keep purchasing what they are
making today. That may be difficult for some (myself in Montana - 48th
in national pay - wow!)but that is how the economy works, and the economy
is what will set the timetable for all that new stuff we are waiting for.

The Golden Age isn't over, we've just gotten an intermission to
remind us how good it is.

Michael Seitz
Missoula MT


Re: News from Naperville

Jeff English
 

"Tim O'Connor" <timoconnor@mediaone.net> wrote:

On the other hand, I'm starting to feel that I've become much too
dependent on vendors. Many people still scratchbuild or kitbash what
they need, and I ought to try that more often myself.
Suddenly I'm feeling a lot better about being in S scale. And I
wasn't feeling bad about it before this news.

---------------------------------------------------------------
Jeff English Troy, New York
Proto:64 Classic Era Railroad Modeling
englij@rpi.edu

| R U T L A N D R A I L R O A D |
Route of the Whippet
---------------------------------------------------------------


InterMountain - Kalmbach issues

tgmadden@...
 

I talked to Marty McG at some length at Naperville, and he's really
psyched about the InterMountain job. Whether he was part of a shakeup
at MR or not I can't say, but he was brought into InterMountain by J.
P. Barger as part of a shakeup at that company. As most of you know,
J. P. is the money man behind InterMountain, Reboxx, Train Quest, and
who knows what else. He recently bought a Rapid Prototyping company
in Mead, Colorado. I know J. P. reasonably well, and with that
purchase he's now a competitor of my principal industrial client. He
moved Ron Angstead, IM's production manager and IM President Frank
Angstead's son, over to this new aquisition and grabbed Marty to
replace him at IM. Marty is VP of Product Development so he's not a
one-for-one replacement for Ron. I gather J. P. wants IM to be more
pro-active when it comes to product selection, and not be so
dependent on other peoples' ideas of what might be worth producing.
This sounds to me like a Good Thing, as my main concern about IM has
always been the lack of anyone with a hobby background in the
company. (Miles Hale was with them for a year, but that's been it.)
Marty has put all projects not yet in the tooling stage on hold until
they develop a coherent product development plan, so he clearly has
some clout.

Tom M.


Re: News from Naperville

Paul Laciura <paull@...>
 

Just to add my $.02 to the fray.........

I can't imagine what direction that Kalmbach is taking MR. There is but one
direction to go, IMHO, down. AS, JW and MM have made a significant
contribution to that magazine. I subscribed just because of the
improvements made by the trio. Before that I purchased only those issues
that had a particular article that I found of interest (usually about once
every three months).

Again the "bottom line" governs. I hope that AS and JW will soon resurface
and share their modeling and literary talents with those who appreciate
scale prototype modeling, not "toy trains".

Paul
Sausalito, CA

-----Original Message-----
From: Benjamin Hom [mailto:bhom3@home.com]
Sent: Monday, October 29, 2001 9:45 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Cc: fwj@mail.fwi.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: News from Naperville


fwj@mail.fwi.com wrote:

The other kicker is that some of us were told this weeked by someone
prominent in the hobby that Kalmbach plans a major shake up at Model
Railroader. Though Andy will stay, Larson is coming back to take the
helm and make some major changes.


According to a well-placed source of mine, the major shake up is well along.
Marty McGuirk and Jeff Wilson will no longer be at Model Railroader. To the
skeptical minds among us, this would appear to be a purge of prototype
modelers at Kalmbach. Rather unfortunate, because Andy has made a lot of
progress there during his tenure.


Ben Hom

P.S. fwj@mail.fwi.com, could you do us the courtesy of signing your posts?
Thanks.









To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
STMFC-unsubscribe@egroups.com



Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/


Re: News from Naperville

thompson@...
 

Ben Hom said:
According to a well-placed source of mine, the major shake up is well along.
Marty McGuirk and Jeff Wilson will no longer be at Model Railroader.
Ed Hawkins replied:
Marty left Kalmbach about a month or so ago and moved to Longmont, Colorado
to work for InterMountain Railway. I talked to him briefly at Naperville.
This is correct; also, Jeff Wilson has already left. The further report
(I don't know this as fact) is that Andy has been moved to another job
within Kalmbach, having nothing to do with MR, and Russ Larson will return
as editor. If this latter appointment is true, my subscription is history.
"Beginners 'R' Us" is not the slogan of a magazine I want to pay for.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 http://www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroads and on Western history


Re: New Intermountain "Premium" Reefers

thompson@...
 

John Nehrich wrote:
On our web site (http://www.union.rpi.edu/railroad/index.html), I've already
posted information like this for PFE (gleaned from Tony's articles in RMC)
on our freight car paint scheme. (I get tired of having to look this stuff
up and I can't remember all of it.) - John Nehrich
John, my only caution would be that the articles were written well before
the book research was finished, and there are a few areas where the book
contradicts the articles: in all cases I believe the book is right. So
basing refs. on the articles only may have some dangers.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 http://www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroads and on Western history


Re: Naperville gift

Tim O'Connor <timoconnor@...>
 

Clark, Richard Burg has a photo of the correct car. But yes many, many
railroads owned such cars -- C&O owned that type exclusively when it
came to 2-bay offset side cars. The casting is designed to fit the Atlas
car side; it may fit the Athearn, I dunno. I am going to ask Martin if I can
get about a dozen more castings...

----- Original Message -----
From: Clark Propst <cepropst@rconnect.com>

Martin graces those who attend his "Tupperware Party" with a gift.
Once I figured out that the piece of gray resin in the envelope had
nothing to do with the photos on the so called 'instruction' sheet. I
have a question. This part will work for alot of different RR's
hoppers, right? If so, is it necessary to use the Atlas car? or will say
an Athrean work?


Naperville gift

Clark Propst <cepropst@...>
 

Martin graces those who attend his "Tupperware Party" with a gift.
Once I figured out that the piece of gray resin in the envelope had
nothing to do with the photos on the so called 'instruction' sheet. I
have a question. This part will work for alot of different RR's
hoppers, right? If so, is it necessary to use the Atlas car? or will say
an Athrean work? I have a project in mind, but would like the straight
scoop before I start. I can't believe I just said that!
Sincerely, thanks for any help,
Clark


Re: News from Naperville

fwj@...
 

--- In STMFC@y..., "Benjamin Hom" <bhom3@h...> wrote:

P.S. fwj@m..., could you do us the courtesy of signing your
posts? Thanks.

Sorry. Victor Baird

184181 - 184200 of 187372