Date   

Re: Bob's photo update

thompson@...
 

Bill Welch reports:
Yet again more info. I believe I had reported that Bob thought that
whatever photos of Southern Pacific & Southern subjects in "The Col. Chet
McCoy Collection" had been sold off before he acquired the bulk of the
collection.
Good news. As he worked his way through the collection, subjects from
both railroads surfaced either mislabeled or misfiled.
I for one was thrilled to hear this news!
Gee, I was thrilled too but on account of the OTHER railroad in the
list...still, I'd assume the bulk of the SP and SRR material is still gone.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 http://www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroads and on Western history


Re: Bob's photo update

Shawn Beckert
 

Guys,

The only time I've actually talked to Bob was at
the NMRA Long Beach convention back in 1996. Does
anyone know if he sells photos through the mail?

Shawn Beckert


Bob's photo update

Bill Welch <bwelch@...>
 

Yet again more info. I believe I had reported that Bob thought that whatever photos of Southern Pacific & Southern subjects in "The Col. Chet McCoy Collection" had been sold off before he acquired the bulk of the collection.

Good news. As he worked his way through the collection, subjects from both railroads surfaced either mislabeled or misfiled. Randy Anderson reported this to me upon his return from the PRR convention where he talked to Bob. Randy said among the Southern subjects were several ventilated boxcars.

I for one was thrilled to hear this news!


Bill 'Welch <bwelch@uucf.org>
Associate Minister, Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Fairfax
P.O. Box 130 Oakton VA 22124 www.uucf.org
Telephone 703 281-4230 Fax 703 281-5399


Re: L&N black PS-3's

dixierails <dixierails@...>
 

Curt,
What's the chance you have created decals appropriate for the A&WP, Western
of Alabama and Georgia RR boxcars. I'm trying to locate the black lettering
for the cars painted black and silver or aluminum? Most important, can I
obtain a couple of sets? Thanks.
Larry Sexton

----- Original Message -----
From: "Curt Fortenberry" <arrphoto@compuserve.com>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Monday, May 14, 2001 3:59 PM


Re: meet

Clark Propst <cepropst@...>
 

Bill Welch wrote: I wish you would do more with that "hot box" report
you have.

To me the definition of 'prototype modeler' would be 1) discipline 2)
focus. I didn't realize this until I got that "hot box" report or as we
refer to it "The List". It has made me do both. At first I only bought
cars that were from number series that were on the list. Now I am only
looking at cars that were on trains that went through here and were
carrying loads that the industries here would ship or receive. I have no
reason to go to hobby shops anymore, they won't have anything I can use.
All the models I build are numbered for cars on the list, I'm having to
renumber some because I have too many cars of flour! I even have 'post
it' tabs on the pages of my RMJs that have a picture of a car from a
number series off the list. The list is like a curse, I should throw it
away.
Bill, what do you suggest I do with it? I can get a copy to you or the
older part is posted in the M&StL groups files. Let me know.
Clark


Re: L&N black PS-3's

Curt Fortenberry <arrphoto@...>
 

Yes, box car red would be the correct color. Also, they had the heap
shield extension which is not offered by Walthers (or anyone since TMI
did the kits).

Curt Fortenberry

--- In STMFC@y..., "John Nehrich" <nehrij@r...> wrote:
Walthers has reissued their former Train-Miniature ribbed side
hopper, the twin PS-3, in several schemes. One is for L&N, with "The
Old Reliable" slogan, but they did the car in black. I thought they
were box car red? -
John


hobby shops

Bill Welch <bwelch@...>
 

I will be in Cleveland OH in June and Amhearst, MA in August. Can anyone make suggestions of hobby shops to visit in either area or in route. I will be driving to both from Northern Virginia. It would help if they are freight car modeler friendly.


Bill 'Welch <bwelch@uucf.org>
Associate Minister, Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Fairfax
P.O. Box 130 Oakton VA 22124 www.uucf.org
Telephone 703 281-4230 Fax 703 281-5399


Re: Fw: A question

Jeff English
 

"Tim O'Connor" <timoconnor@mediaone.net>

NYC lot 596-B.

(Lookie, Jeff, I remembered to use a dash!)
And you used a capital B. I guess you get agold star this time.

---------------------------------------------------------------
Jeff English Troy, New York
Proto:64 Classic Era Railroad Modeling
englij@rpi.edu

| R U T L A N D R A I L R O A D |
Route of the Whippet
---------------------------------------------------------------


Re: Fw: A question

Jeff English
 

SmilinByll@aol.com wrote:

I have a request from a friend of mine about a P&LE boxcar.

In a 1965 Freight Car Register, P&LE 36000-36499 are listed as 40'
boxcars of
3213 cu ft capacity, 55 tons rating.

Any idea when these cars were built and by whom?
P&LE 36000 - 36499, blt 1929 by Standard Steel Car at Butler, Pa
as Lot 596-B. Never renumbered. These were modified USRA-
design all-steel cars with an inside heigth of 9'4". They had 5-4
Dreadnaught ends and Youngstown doors, as well as the
characteristic Murphy Solid Steel roof (flat panels, with overhanging
eaves) and eight-panel steel sides with straight side sills. AAR
cast-steel trucks.
There were still 293 cars in the 1-65 ORER, but only one by the
4-67 ORER.

---------------------------------------------------------------
Jeff English Troy, New York
Proto:64 Classic Era Railroad Modeling
englij@rpi.edu

| R U T L A N D R A I L R O A D |
Route of the Whippet
---------------------------------------------------------------


Re: lime

Jeff English
 

"Tim O'Connor" <timoconnor@mediaone.net> wrote:

These seven States produced 10.5 million tons (11.6 million short tons) or
61% of the total output. Based on monthly data, the leading markets were
chemical and industrial, steel, environmental, and construction.
Since cement was stated to have been accounted for
separately, I then have to assume that "construction" refers to cut
stone blocks, whereas all the other uses listed above involve lime
as a reactant.
I'd be interested to know which states were/are the principal
producers of architectural limestone. Indiana is probably the best
known source (see the 70s film "Breaking Away", about class
divisions between U of I students in Bloomington vs. the adolescent
townies whose fathers were "cutters", i.e. blue-collar employees of
the limestone quarries).

---------------------------------------------------------------
Jeff English Troy, New York
Proto:64 Classic Era Railroad Modeling
englij@rpi.edu

| R U T L A N D R A I L R O A D |
Route of the Whippet
---------------------------------------------------------------


Re: Fw: A question

Tim O'Connor <timoconnor@...>
 

I have a request from a friend of mine about a P&LE boxcar.
In a 1965 Freight Car Register, P&LE 36000-36499 are listed
as 40' boxcars of 3213 cu ft capacity, 55 tons rating.
Accordion to my info, built 1929 by Standard Steel Car Co.,
NYC lot 596-B.

(Lookie, Jeff, I remembered to use a dash!)


Timothy O'Connor <timoconnor@mediaone.net>
Marlborough, Massachusetts


Fw: A question

byronrose@...
 

Can anyone help?

--------- Forwarded message ----------
From: SmilinByll@aol.com
To: byronrose@juno.com
Date: Sun, 13 May 2001 20:41:38 EDT
Subject: A question
Message-ID: <12.cd0e173.283083c2@aol.com>

Hi

I have a request from a friend of mine about a P&LE boxcar.

In a 1965 Freight Car Register, P&LE 36000-36499 are listed as 40'
boxcars of
3213 cu ft capacity, 55 tons rating.

Any idea when these cars were built and by whom? I have a NYC diagram
book
but it's in storage.

Appreciate the help.

Bill


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Re: rock trains

byronrose@...
 

On Sun, 13 May 2001 11:29:37 -0700 thompson@signaturepress.com writes:

Not sure what "limerock" is, but would guess limestone, as that is
the
substrate of most of Florida. If so, it has numerous metallurgical
uses,
and might be going a number of places, including the Alabama steel
mills.
Limestone is also a major ingredient in Florida concrete and other than
the weather, may be the reason that roads in Florida last 20-30 times
longer than roads in Pennsylvania.

That of course had nothing to do with the question asked, but saying it
made me feel good.

Limestone is shipped all over Florida and parts of the south for
construction purposes. It is used as a subbase in road work as well as
construction concrete poured on grade which is common (account no
basements) and is a part of almost all concrete mixed in the state, plus
its use as a major gardening material. They pay extra for river gravel
in Florida for purely decorative purposes while up here (Penna.) it is
dirt cheap and used in concrete where it doesn't bond as well as the
politicians think. But it's dirt cheap.

End of tirade.

Thank you for your indulgence.

BSR

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Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less!
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Re: rock trains

Dave & Libby Nelson <muskoka@...>
 

To add to Tim's comments, the ICC classification families had Limestone,
Sand/Gravel, Broken Rock, Industrial Sand, and Slag as different commodities
to be reported individually. It's my understanding that the Sand/Gravel
refered to generally smooth stone highly suitable for most concrete work;
broken rock was for track ballast of course and in those concrete
applications that called for extra strength (the jagged edges locked against
each other). Slag had many uses; if it was high in iron it often was used
in a concrete as ship's ballast.

Dave Nelson

-----Original Message-----
From: Tim O'Connor [mailto:timoconnor@mediaone.net]
Sent: Sunday, May 13, 2001 2:43 PM
Sand & Gravel is a HUGE commodity, but I don't know what percentage of
transport remains by rail. Current production of sand & gravel is around
1 BILLION tons a year in the US. The largest single use is for concrete.
"Industrial" sand (e.g. foundry sand) production is much less, about 25
million tons, but it can travel much further and often does so in covered
hoppers.

Timothy O'Connor <timoconnor@mediaone.net>


Re: rock trains

Tim O'Connor <timoconnor@...>
 

Dave Nelson wrote

As for "Rock Trains", I can say with certainly that sand and gravel (which
doesn't include limestone) was one of the most common loads in the steam
era -- it ranks as the #1 tonnage commodity in 1950 for about a dozen states
and is the the top 5 for virtually every state. Distance moved is almost
always under 100 miles.
Sand & Gravel is a HUGE commodity, but I don't know what percentage of
transport remains by rail. Current production of sand & gravel is around
1 BILLION tons a year in the US. The largest single use is for concrete.
"Industrial" sand (e.g. foundry sand) production is much less, about 25
million tons, but it can travel much further and often does so in covered
hoppers.

Timothy O'Connor <timoconnor@mediaone.net>
Marlborough, Massachusetts


Re: lime

Tim O'Connor <timoconnor@...>
 

From the late, venerable Bureau of Mines:
-----------------------------------------

In 1994, lime producers at 113 plants in 33 States sold or used
17.3 million tons (19.1 million short tons) of lime... Most of
the [sales] increase was accounted for by commercial producers
reporting higher quicklime sales. Ten companies, operating 27
plants, accounted for 55% of domestic output. Principal producing
States, in decreasing order, were Ohio, Missouri, Alabama,
Pennsylvania, Kentucky, Texas, and Illinois.

These seven States produced 10.5 million tons (11.6 million short tons)
or 61% of the total output. Based on monthly data, the leading markets
were chemical and industrial, steel, environmental, and construction.

Recycling: Large quantities of lime are regenerated by paper mills.
Some municipal water treatment plants regenerate lime from softening
sludge. Quicklime is regenerated from waste hydrated lime in the
carbide industry. Data for these plants are not included as production
in order to avoid duplication.

Events, Trends, and Issues: The deadline for phase I compliance with
sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission regulations of the Clean Air Act Amendments
of 1990 was January 1, 1995. After that date it is unlawful for any
affected utility unit to emit SO2 in excess of the tonnage limitation
of the utility's emission allowances. To supply lime for this flue gas
desulfurization market, the lime industry plans to install in excess of
1.8 million tons per year (2.0 million short tons per year) of new
capacity by the end of 1995. Kilns are being added to existing plants
in Kentucky, Nevada, Tennessee, and West Virginia, and a new plant is
being built in Illinois.

P.S. Cement production is accounted for separately in the BOM data,
amounting to about 5 times as much as lime production...


Timothy O'Connor <timoconnor@mediaone.net>
Marlborough, Massachusetts


Virus Fixed

Steve Hoxie <steveh@...>
 

I think I have the virus deleted and everything back to normal. There
should be no attachment on this message.

Sorry for the inconvenience. Back to trains.

Steve Hoxie
Pensacola FL


Re: rock trains

aidrian.bridgeman-sutton <aidrian.bridgeman-sutton@...>
 

One of the principal uses of limestone was in the steel making process - I
don't know enough about the geology of the steel making areas in Alabama to
say that that it would have required local supplies to have been
supplemented with shipments from Florida.

I've seen evidence of it being shipped in hoppers as well as gons - these
would have not been filled to cubic capacity since the density of limestone
is far greater than coal

Aidrian


VIRUS ALERT......... Important...

Denis Blake <dblake3@...>
 

Guys

If you get an email from Steve Hoxie DO NOT open it's attachment.....It is
infected with the Badtrans32 virus. I recently went a round with it. It is
a nuisance, nothing more to be honest with you. However, who needs that
aggravation? I know that I don't.


Denis F. Blake
Columbus, OH
TTHOTS

Visit my photopoint site

http://albums.photopoint.com/j/AlbumList?u=1621389&f=0

----- Original Message -----
From: <billd@gci-net.com>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, May 13, 2001 2:47 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] rock trains


One of the most common uses for limestone is in the
preperation of cement. Basically it is dehydrated in a kiln
with several other components(often coal fired, since the
coal ash can be used in the process) As a result, since it
is a critical component of cement production, and is
relatively common, it is shipped in bulk, often for short
distances.

Bill Daniels


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Re: rock trains

dixierails <dixierails@...>
 

Limerock was used as one of the sources for extraction of phosphate for
fertilizer. Up until the 1920s, the rock was extracted, crushed, and shipped
out of state to chemical plants that treated the rock with sulfuric acid to
obtain a usuable phosphate product. In the mid-20s, commercial fertilizer
companies realized they'd ship less waste if the processing was done in
Florida. By the early 1930s the ACL had started to ship this enriched
fertilizer component by specially designed covered hoppers. I believe
Ambroid made a wooden version of these cars in the 40s-50s. By the early
40s, the ACL was using a radial roofed covered hopper car for
transpostation.

Today, the higher grade limerock is processed in Florida, still using,
sulfuric acid. Friday morning I drove past Baldwin, Fla (CSX trackage and
yard) and there were over thirty sulfuric acid tankcars headed south to the
area east of Tampa. There were about an equal number of cylindrical potash
covered hoppers headed in the same direction. This is almost the end of the
planting season and major fertilizer producing period.

Limestone is used in the production of steel, and the N&W and Virginian
shipped a lot in their low side 40' gons in the 1930-50s. I don't remember
the Florida limerock being used for that purpose. Hope this helps.
Larry Sexton
Crystal River, Fla.

----- Original Message -----
From: <ThisIsR@aol.com>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, May 13, 2001 12:21 PM
Subject: [STMFC] rock trains


What industrial applications would limerock have been used for,besides >
fill for roads, during the steam era?
Would low sided gons or hoopers have been used

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