Date   
Re: Hooker Chemical, Tacoma

Tom Madden
 

On Fri, Apr 10, 2020 at 10:40 AM, Schuyler Larrabee wrote:

Not the recreational boat houses.  I meant the arrangement directly across the river, with the rectangular part in the middle, and long dividers parallel to the flow of the river. Are those to retain log rafts?

 

BTW, which way is the river flowing, L to R, or R to L?

It's not a river - it's a tidal basin. The first two images are file photos from an April 2017 article in the Tacoma News Tribune regarding cleanup of the Hooker site. The third photo is a panorama made from three shots I took in June 1961 the day I was discharged from the USAF. I'm not sure where I was standing (Point Defiance??) but the following shots were of a stuffed and mounted NP 4-6-0. Can't tell you how the panorama relates geographically to the Hooker site, but it does show the heavy industrialization of the Tacoma waterfront as well as numerous log rafts.

Tom Madden

 

 

Re: Hooker Chemical, Tacoma

Patrick Wade
 

Regarding the opposite river bank. I think that those are winter moorings for power boats. They drive in and are individually lifted out of the water for winter storage in their own garage. I am guessing that to leave them in the water might result in ice damage to the hulls.

Pat Wade
Santa Barbara, CA

On Apr 10, 2020, at 8:57 AM, Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io
<schuyler.larrabee=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Well, my first thought about this spectacular photo was "Wow, a snap-track layout!" Well, not quite, the radii are larger than even 22", but I also would like to know what is that arrangement on the opposite side of the river all about?

Schuyler

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Friday, April 10, 2020 10:27 AM
To: bbfcl@groups.io; mfcl@groups.io; RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Hooker Chemical, Tacoma


Jeff Helm pointed out this SPECTACULAR industrial photo from the 1960's but the Hooker Chemical plant here was built in the 1940's and lasted through the 1990's (at least that long) so I thought it is worth sharing around. If my stupid mail program truncates the long URL you'll have to paste it back together to see it in your browser. :-\:-)

cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/ajaxhelper/?CISOROOT=p17061coll21&CISOPTR=32743&action=2&DMSCALE=100&DMWIDTH=2848&DMHEIGHT=2210

===================================================

On 4/8/2020 3:05 PM, Jeff Helm wrote:
Found the online photos, at the Tacoma Public Library digital collections. Some interesting links:
First two are the caustic tank car.

http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
l21/id/32346/rec/81
http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
l21/id/32704/rec/92
http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
l21/id/5536/rec/22
http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
l21/id/16060/rec/44
http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
l21/id/32743/rec/75
http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
l21/id/31462/rec/50
http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
l21/id/13399/rec/49

--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*






Re: Hooker Chemical, Tacoma

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Not the recreational boat houses.  I meant the arrangement directly across the river, with the rectangular part in the middle, and long dividers parallel to the flow of the river. Are those to retain log rafts?

 

BTW, which way is the river flowing, L to R, or R to L?

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Richard Townsend via groups.io
Sent: Friday, April 10, 2020 12:34 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Hooker Chemical, Tacoma

 

Not sure which arrangement you're talking about, but there are boat houses (for recreational boats) to the left and to the right are places where log rafts are kept before the logs go to saw mills.

Richard Townsend

Lincoln City, OR

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io <schuyler.larrabee@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>; bbfcl <bbfcl@groups.io>; mfcl <mfcl@groups.io>; RealSTMFC <RealSTMFC@groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Apr 10, 2020 8:57 am
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Hooker Chemical, Tacoma

Well, my first thought about this spectacular photo was "Wow, a snap-track layout!"  Well, not quite, the radii are larger than even 22", but I also would like to know what is that arrangement on the opposite side of the river all about?

Schuyler

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Friday, April 10, 2020 10:27 AM
To: bbfcl@groups.io; mfcl@groups.io; RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Hooker Chemical, Tacoma


Jeff Helm pointed out this SPECTACULAR industrial photo from the 1960's but the Hooker Chemical plant here was built in the 1940's and lasted through the 1990's (at least that long) so I thought it is worth sharing around. If my stupid mail program truncates the long URL you'll have to paste it back together to see it in your browser. :-\:-)

cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/ajaxhelper/?CISOROOT=p17061coll21&CISOPTR=32743&action=2&DMSCALE=100&DMWIDTH=2848&DMHEIGHT=2210

===================================================

On 4/8/2020 3:05 PM, Jeff Helm wrote:
> Found the online photos, at the Tacoma Public Library digital collections.  Some interesting links:
> First two are the caustic tank car.
>
> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
> l21/id/32346/rec/81
> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
> l21/id/32704/rec/92
> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
> l21/id/5536/rec/22
> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
> l21/id/16060/rec/44
> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
> l21/id/32743/rec/75
> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
> l21/id/31462/rec/50
> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
> l21/id/13399/rec/49
>


--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*





Re: BAR 7000-series reefers

Tim O'Connor
 


BAR 7123

On 4/9/2020 11:40 PM, Andy Laurent via groups.io wrote:
Gents,
Does anyone on the list have a color photo of a BAR 7000-series 40' steel refrigerator car in the as-built orange scheme from 1951-53 (two batches)? I am curious what color the ends and sills were painted. I checked the message archives and only see discussion of the red/white/blue scheme.  Henderson mentions a solid orange scheme on Page 23 of Classic Freight Cars Vol 3 as being the original, but this image suggests that they had dark ends, roofs, and sills:  BAR 7015 - Bangor Daily News March 1953

Thank you,
Andy Laurent

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

Re: Hooker Chemical, Tacoma

Richard Townsend
 

Not sure which arrangement you're talking about, but there are boat houses (for recreational boats) to the left and to the right are places where log rafts are kept before the logs go to saw mills.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io <schuyler.larrabee@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>; bbfcl <bbfcl@groups.io>; mfcl <mfcl@groups.io>; RealSTMFC <RealSTMFC@groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Apr 10, 2020 8:57 am
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Hooker Chemical, Tacoma

Well, my first thought about this spectacular photo was "Wow, a snap-track layout!"  Well, not quite, the radii are larger than even 22", but I also would like to know what is that arrangement on the opposite side of the river all about?

Schuyler

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Friday, April 10, 2020 10:27 AM
To: bbfcl@groups.io; mfcl@groups.io; RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Hooker Chemical, Tacoma


Jeff Helm pointed out this SPECTACULAR industrial photo from the 1960's but the Hooker Chemical plant here was built in the 1940's and lasted through the 1990's (at least that long) so I thought it is worth sharing around. If my stupid mail program truncates the long URL you'll have to paste it back together to see it in your browser. :-\:-)

cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/ajaxhelper/?CISOROOT=p17061coll21&CISOPTR=32743&action=2&DMSCALE=100&DMWIDTH=2848&DMHEIGHT=2210

===================================================

On 4/8/2020 3:05 PM, Jeff Helm wrote:
> Found the online photos, at the Tacoma Public Library digital collections.  Some interesting links:
> First two are the caustic tank car.
>
> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
> l21/id/32346/rec/81
> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
> l21/id/32704/rec/92
> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
> l21/id/5536/rec/22
> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
> l21/id/16060/rec/44
> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
> l21/id/32743/rec/75
> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
> l21/id/31462/rec/50
> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
> l21/id/13399/rec/49
>


--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*






Re: Meat reefers

Tim O'Connor
 


I have extras if anyone is looking for the kits. I bought too many I guess out
of sheer excitement at the time. They are excellent models. :-)




On 4/9/2020 8:42 PM, Eric Hansmann wrote:
I don’t think the Red Caboose Mather reefers have been produced for almost a decade. 


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

On Apr 9, 2020, at 5:22 PM, Donald B. Valentine via groups.io <riverman_vt@...> wrote:

   I was about to point out that Morrell used a LOT of Mather meat reefers and Red Caboose has offered one for some
years that seems to match many photos fairly well. BUT these are 36 ft. reefers. Didn't Morrell also use some 40 ft.
Mather cars as well? I've got a foot of file cabinet space o this stuff gong back 20 years as Doug Harding is aware. Need 
to find some time to dig into it. Incidentally the meat packers that were most helpful in offereing info on tier rail operations
and equipment in that period were Hormel and Oscar Mayer, othof which were quite helpful.

Cordially, Don Valentine


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

Re: Meat reefers

Nelson Moyer
 

Yes, as someone said, the Sioux Falls plant held the record for 125 cars in one day, or something like that. But the thread started with my question about the Morrell plant in Ottumwa, IA. We don't have a definitive answer for that plant, though from the total number of hog, sheep, and cattle kills it very well might fill a train. The operative word is 'might', because the only wheel report of a train that's surfaced included some stock cars and a produce reefer to fill out the train. Moot point, because few of us are going to model a 50 car meat train, though I know a guy who ran an SFRD produce train with something like 60 cars on the La Mesa layout. Only a retired lawyer can afford all those reefers and the ATSF ABBA units that pulled them.

Nelson Moyer

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Friday, April 10, 2020 10:39 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Meat reefers


There were DEFINITELY slaughterhouses that could produce 50 loads per day! A full load of beef sides or pork bellies probably had barely 20 tons of meat, if that. I once read a PRR publication that listed average tons per load and was surprised how many cargos did not approach the full weight capacity of freight cars.

Scan from the Illinois Central 1955 annual report.




On 4/9/2020 3:24 PM, Ted Schnepf wrote:
Hi Nelson,

Your are correct in that that one plant could not produce 50 loads in
one day. Keep in mind the Milwaukee, RI, and Wabash also got a few
loads of meat in Ottumwa. Off course the plant also produced tank cars
of tallow and cars of hides. And then I am certain the train was
filled with other priority cars going eastbound.

As I understand the packing industry Monday was a slow shipping day,
and then at the end of the week Friday and Saturday the output increased.

I also have a shortage of Morrell reefers, in my case out of Sioux Falls.

Ted Schnepf
126 Will Scarlet,
Elgin, Ill. 60120

--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*

Re: Hooker Chemical, Tacoma

Allen Cain
 

Probably has been asked and answered but does anyone know when Hooker adopted the orange and black paint scheme?

Allen Cain

Re: Hooker Chemical, Tacoma

Allen Cain
 

Great shot!

Would model it but would go broke buying those great orange and black tank cars!

Allen  Cain

Re: BAR 7000-series reefers

Rich Gibson
 

The Northern New England Color Guide has several photos of these in solid orange paint. However, the earliest picture is 5/57 showing two cars fresh out of the Derby shops Therefore, this may have been a repaint. Pictures of the 6000 and 8000 series cars with dark ends show them to be black.
Rich Gibson
Golden, CO

Re: Freight car roofs, 1959

Tim O'Connor
 


And check out those CLEAN patches on the wood reefer - I suppose to make the
reporting marks and other data legible! I'll bet no modelers have done that. :-P

In 1962 that NP round roof box car would be a recent addition to the NP roster.

Tim O'Connor


On 4/9/2020 4:51 PM, Tom Madden via groups.io wrote:
On Thu, Apr 9, 2020 at 01:10 PM, D. Scott Chatfield wrote:
Interesting view of a yard in California in 1959.  Note that Brock's Law is in force....
 
Have been systematically scanning my slides going back to 1968. Here's one from September 1962, stopped for a passing CB&Q freight in Edgemont SD on our way from the Black Hills to Colorado and just had to take a photo from the car window. Sure enough, a round roof NP auto car just made it into the frame at the right edge. Brock's Law prevails!

Tom Madden
 
 

Attachments:



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

Re: Hooker Chemical, Tacoma

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Well, my first thought about this spectacular photo was "Wow, a snap-track layout!" Well, not quite, the radii are larger than even 22", but I also would like to know what is that arrangement on the opposite side of the river all about?

Schuyler

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Friday, April 10, 2020 10:27 AM
To: bbfcl@groups.io; mfcl@groups.io; RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Hooker Chemical, Tacoma


Jeff Helm pointed out this SPECTACULAR industrial photo from the 1960's but the Hooker Chemical plant here was built in the 1940's and lasted through the 1990's (at least that long) so I thought it is worth sharing around. If my stupid mail program truncates the long URL you'll have to paste it back together to see it in your browser. :-\:-)

cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/ajaxhelper/?CISOROOT=p17061coll21&CISOPTR=32743&action=2&DMSCALE=100&DMWIDTH=2848&DMHEIGHT=2210

===================================================

On 4/8/2020 3:05 PM, Jeff Helm wrote:
Found the online photos, at the Tacoma Public Library digital collections. Some interesting links:
First two are the caustic tank car.

http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
l21/id/32346/rec/81
http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
l21/id/32704/rec/92
http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
l21/id/5536/rec/22
http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
l21/id/16060/rec/44
http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
l21/id/32743/rec/75
http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
l21/id/31462/rec/50
http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061col
l21/id/13399/rec/49

--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*

Re: Meat reefers

Tim O'Connor
 

There were DEFINITELY slaughterhouses that could produce 50 loads per day! A full load
of beef sides or pork bellies probably had barely 20 tons of meat, if that. I once read
a PRR publication that listed average tons per load and was surprised how many cargos did
not approach the full weight capacity of freight cars.

Scan from the Illinois Central 1955 annual report.

On 4/9/2020 3:24 PM, Ted Schnepf wrote:
Hi Nelson,

Your are correct in that that one plant could not produce 50 loads in one day. Keep in mind the Milwaukee, RI, and Wabash also got a few loads of meat in Ottumwa. Off course the plant also produced tank cars of tallow and cars of hides. And then I am certain the train was filled with other priority cars going eastbound.

As I understand the packing industry Monday was a slow shipping day, and then at the end of the week Friday and Saturday the output increased.

I also have a shortage of Morrell reefers, in my case out of Sioux Falls.

Ted Schnepf
126 Will Scarlet,
Elgin, Ill. 60120
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*

Re: Meat reefers

William Hirt
 

Ted,

As Don Valentine pointed out, the Red Caboose Mather is a 36' car. From what I can see in the January 1953 ORER, there are only two of cars of that type listed in service under the Morrell listing. There over 1200 of the 40' cars in service which was noted to be in the Refrigerator Car Guide. Morrell was also leasing 3 Mather 40' boxcars (MCAX Series 500-699).

Bill Hirt

On 4/9/2020 8:14 PM, Ted Schnepf wrote:
Hi Bill and Nelson,

I dug out my 1954 Moody's Industrial's book. Morrell had three US p;ants at the time. Ottumwa was the largest 1.9 mil sq ft,, followed by Sioux Falls at 1.4 mil sq ft, and Topeka Kansas. The annual slaughter was 4.5 million hogs, cattle and sheep per year for the three plants.

Branch houses were located in Los Angles, Oakland Ca, St Paul, Mineapolis, Duluth, Fargo, ND, Memphis, Mobil, Al, Philadelphia, Syrarcus, NY, Aberdeen, SD and Liverpool, England. Morrell started in England in 1827. Ottumwa also had a company creamery and the Red Heart dog food plant.

"Company opwns about 550 reefers and tanks cars and leases additional reefers"
,_._,_

Re: Meat reefers

Bob Webber
 

The H&B built 1910 & 1911 Mather Beef and Vegetable 37' cars appear to have been built new.   They did have steel UF & framing, with sheathing, but there is no indication that the frames were not new. 
Beef Car users - Detroit Refrigerator Express, Evansville Packing, White Pro. Co.
50 Veg. cars have no individual users.




At 08:48 AM 4/10/2020, you wrote:
This is the history included with the Red Caboose Model, written by Richard Hendrickson.
 
Mather's 37' Refrigerator Cars
Among the cars in the Mather leasing fleet were several hundred 37' meat refrigerator cars which had been converted from stock cars. From the 1930's through the 1950's, several hundred of these cars were leased to the Rath Packing Co. Other meat packing firms that leased 37' Mather reefers at one time or another include the Hygrade Food Products Corporation, the Hunter Packing Co., the Kohrs Packing Co., and Oscar Mayer and Co. These cars were also operated on a short-term lease basis under Mather's own MUNX and MRRX reporting marks.
 
Mather's 37' refrigerator cars had steel framed bodies with wood sheathing and interior lining, single sheathed ends, and Mather
patent metal sheathed roofs. During the 1940's they were upgraded with AB air brakes, geared hand brakes, new draft gear, and modified end sills. In this form, many remained active through the 1950's and some lasted into the 1960's.
 
 
Doug  Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org
 
 
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [ mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bob Webber
Sent: Friday, April 10, 2020 8:23 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io; main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Meat reefers
 
There were 36' 7" Mather Vegetable & Beef cars built by H&B.  I've not looked at the Red Caboose model, but if they were "short" - shorter than the 40' cars also produced, it could be those?

At 08:03 AM 4/10/2020, william darnaby wrote:

Yes, Don, thatâ€â„„¢s the one.  Doug has replied that the short RC models are likely foobies so it appears the Sunshine model is the only option.  I have also built one and the kit was typical of Martin‬™s early efforts.
 
Would you please contact me offlinee as I have a NERS question.
 
Thanks,
Bill Darnaby
 
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Donald B. Valentine via groups.io
Sent: Friday, April 10, 2020 5:20 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Meat reefers
 
 Hi Bill,
     If you mean Gene Green's reefer book I've had it for years and should also have noted that
all the 40 ft. Mather cars I'm familiar with had steel ends, unlike any of the 36 ft.cars I've seen
or the GA built Morrell cars.
 
Cordially, Don Valentine

Bob Webber

Bob Webber

Hooker Chemical, Tacoma

Tim O'Connor
 

Jeff Helm pointed out this SPECTACULAR industrial photo from the 1960's but the Hooker Chemical
plant here was built in the 1940's and lasted through the 1990's (at least that long) so I thought
it is worth sharing around. If my stupid mail program truncates the long URL you'll have to paste
it back together to see it in your browser. :-\:-)

cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/ajaxhelper/?CISOROOT=p17061coll21&CISOPTR=32743&action=2&DMSCALE=100&DMWIDTH=2848&DMHEIGHT=2210

===================================================

--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*

Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Meat reefers

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

CJ;

 

I knew a guy that worked there, also.  He seemed to have done the same jobs as you.  I know they fabricated long girders, and he said they got 65-ft gons in from the PB&NE all the time.  I asked if it was Beth steel, and he confirmed that they got their steel from Bethlehem, because it was cheaper, even with USS literally at their back door.  I wonder what those gons were?  Logic would say Bethlehem products?

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of CJ Riley via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, April 9, 2020 3:28 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Meat reefers

 

I see the roof of Levenson Steel poking up. I worked there for a few weeks in the early 60s painting steel for I-7 in eastern Ohio. I was transferred there following 2months doing the same job at their McKees Rocks facility in the leased former Pressed Steel Car plant. Even got to load over length girders in mill gone for a bit. 


Re: Meat reefers

Tim O'Connor
 


Packaged and prepared meats from the midwest probably were more common on the
west coast than whole animal sides due to the distances and transit times. For
fresh meat, stock cars carried animals to slaughterhouses in California and that
traffic continued into the 1990's. But there are plenty of pics of meatpacker
reefers on the west coast.

Tim O'Connor



On 4/8/2020 11:51 AM, Richard Townsend via groups.io wrote:
No, not safe to say. Meat reefers ran just about everywhere. Maybe only one at a time on branches, but they ran. 


On Apr 8, 2020, at 8:46 AM, radiodial868 <radiodial57@...> wrote:

So it is safe to say that meat reefers were not a west coast thing, say 1930's/1940's?  I have not seen any in period pictures, but doesn't mean they didn't exist.  I have a couple of Sylvan meat reefer kits I keep wondering if I should build to run on Western Pacific/Southern Pacific consists.
--
-------------------
RJ Dial

Mendocino, CA


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

Re: Meat reefers

Douglas Harding
 

This is the history included with the Red Caboose Model, written by Richard Hendrickson.

 

Mather's 37' Refrigerator Cars

Among the cars in the Mather leasing fleet were several hundred 37' meat refrigerator cars which had been converted from stock cars. From the 1930's through the 1950's, several hundred of these cars were leased to the Rath Packing Co. Other meat packing firms that leased 37' Mather reefers at one time or another include the Hygrade Food Products Corporation, the Hunter Packing Co., the Kohrs Packing Co., and Oscar Mayer and Co. These cars were also operated on a short-term lease basis under Mather's own MUNX and MRRX reporting marks.

 

Mather's 37' refrigerator cars had steel framed bodies with wood sheathing and interior lining, single sheathed ends, and Mather

patent metal sheathed roofs. During the 1940's they were upgraded with AB air brakes, geared hand brakes, new draft gear, and modified end sills. In this form, many remained active through the 1950's and some lasted into the 1960's.

 

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bob Webber
Sent: Friday, April 10, 2020 8:23 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io; main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Meat reefers

 

There were 36' 7" Mather Vegetable & Beef cars built by H&B.  I've not looked at the Red Caboose model, but if they were "short" - shorter than the 40' cars also produced, it could be those?

At 08:03 AM 4/10/2020, william darnaby wrote:

Yes, Don, that’s the one.  Doug has replied that the short RC models are likely foobies so it appears the Sunshine model is the only option.  I have also built one and the kit was typical of Martin’s early efforts.
 
Would you please contact me offline as I have a NERS question.
 
Thanks,
Bill Darnaby
 
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Donald B. Valentine via groups.io
Sent: Friday, April 10, 2020 5:20 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Meat reefers
 
 Hi Bill,
     If you mean Gene Green's reefer book I've had it for years and should also have noted that
all the 40 ft. Mather cars I'm familiar with had steel ends, unlike any of the 36 ft.cars I've seen
or the GA built Morrell cars.
 
Cordially, Don Valentine

Bob Webber

Re: Meat reefers

Bob Webber
 

There were 36' 7" Mather Vegetable & Beef cars built by H&B.  I've not looked at the Red Caboose model, but if they were "short" - shorter than the 40' cars also produced, it could be those?


At 08:03 AM 4/10/2020, william darnaby wrote:
Yes, Don, that’s the one.  Doug has replied that the short RC models are likely foobies so it appears the Sunshine model is the only option.  I have also built one and the kit was typical of Martin’s early efforts.
 
Would you please contact me offline as I have a NERS question.
 
Thanks,
Bill Darnaby
 
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Donald B. Valentine via groups.io
Sent: Friday, April 10, 2020 5:20 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Meat reefers
 
 Hi Bill,
     If you mean Gene Green's reefer book I've had it for years and should also have noted that
all the 40 ft. Mather cars I'm familiar with had steel ends, unlike any of the 36 ft.cars I've seen
or the GA built Morrell cars.
 
Cordially, Don Valentine

Bob Webber