Date   
Re: Photo: B&LE Gondola 16331 With Scrap Load (1942)

Richard Townsend
 

The mention of pulling up rails reminded me that I have several AFEs from the war years in which the C&S authorized removing various tracks to free up rail for scrap drives.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Sent: Wed, Aug 5, 2020 9:18 am
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: B&LE Gondola 16331 With Scrap Load (1942)

Photo: B&LE Gondola 16331 With Scrap Load (1942)
A photo from the Ann Arbor District Library
The World War II scrap drive included pulling up rails as well:
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA

Re: Photo: SFRD Stainless Steel Reefer 13000

Edward
 

Here is an O scale model I built of it in 1987.
My only reference at the time was a photo and brief description of it in the 1953 Carbuilder's Cyclopedia.
Some hand lettering had to be done for what was not available in an SFRD Champion decal set 

Ed Bommer 

Photo: B&LE Gondola 16331 With Scrap Load (1942)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: B&LE Gondola 16331 With Scrap Load (1942)

A photo from the Ann Arbor District Library

https://aadl.org/sites/default/files/photos/N082_0380_006.jpg

The World War II scrap drive included pulling up rails as well:

https://aadl.org/sites/default/files/photos/N186_0033_001.jpg

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Photo: SFRD Stainless Steel Reefer 13000

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: SFRD Stainless Steel Reefer 13000

A photo from the Santa Fe Railway Historical and Modeling Society archives:

https://sfrhms.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/RR-41-A2004-0017-Temple-Railroad-Heritage-Museum-031.jpg

In 1948, Santa Fe had this one-off refrigerator car built in stainless steel by Consolidated Steel Industries. It featured plug doors, convertible bunkers and several other progressive features. Santa Fe used most of these features in rebuilding its aging fleet of wood body reefers that included new steel roofs and sides, but did not repeat the use of stainless steel.

This was the sole member of the Rr-41 class and eventually was renumbered 4150.

A Keith Jordan article on kit bashing an HO model of SFRD 13000 was published in the Second Quarter 1989 issue of Santa Fe Modeler.
For the record, this topic came up on another group when someone mistook this car for an aluminum bodied refrigerator car. Santa Fe had no aluminum bodies refrigerator cars.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Re: Freight car progress

radiodial868
 

"Drawer of Disappointments"   I like that phrase.
Mine is more like a "Penalty Box"  It is a shelf by the bench where I can place "those who do not cooperate" and let the subconscious work on solutions. I try and never let the penalty box exceed 2 cars before buckling down and getting them past their sticking point.
-------------------
RJ Dial

Mendocino, CA

Freight car progress

Eric Hansmann
 

I've summarized a few recent projects in my latest blog post. Most are freight cars, except for a cool model of a 1918 truck. Here's the direct link.


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

NYC 19000 series caboose color

Walter Cox
 

It looks like pink would work and you can ignore my previous post.
 

In a message dated 8/4/2020 5:05:20 PM Eastern Standard Time, WaltGCox@... writes:
 
Hi Dave,
I would do a test run of the mixture before using it on a model. Back when Floquil was the "go to" paint I was looking for a way to get a faded  appearance on some single sheathed boxcars in grain hauling service and was warned not to add white  as it would turn the red to pink but to use a  buff color.. I can't say if the white would have turned the red pink as I never tried it.
Good luck, Walt
In a message dated 8/4/2020 11:45:50 AM Eastern Standard Time, davelawler@...  writes|
Thank you Mark. I have some Floquil Boxcar red and Reefer White in my old paint stash,
more than enough to paint a HO caboose. I guess I'm good to go.
Dave Lawler

Re: NYC 19000 series caboose color

Walter Cox
 

Hi Dave,
I would do a test run of the mixture before using it on a model. Back when Floquil was the "go to" paint I was looking for a way to get a faded  appearance on some single sheathed boxcars in grain hauling service and was warned not to add white  as it would turn the red to pink but to use a  buff color.. I can't say if the white would have turned the red pink as I never tried it.
Good luck, Walt
In a message dated 8/4/2020 11:45:50 AM Eastern Standard Time, davelawler@...  writes|

Thank you Mark. I have some Floquil Boxcar red and Reefer White in my old paint stash,
more than enough to paint a HO caboose. I guess I'm good to go.
Dave Lawler

Re: NYC 19000 series caboose color

Dave Lawler
 

Thank you Peter, you've laid my fears to rest.
Dave Lawler

Re: Oscar Mayer Freight Car taken in 1931

Richard Townsend
 

-----Original Message-----
From: G.J. Irwin <groups@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Sent: Tue, Aug 4, 2020 11:47 am
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Oscar Mayer Freight Car taken in 1931

With respect to the Oscar Mayer car, if I recall correctly from my late father's accumulation of HO trains, the folks at Athearn did a car similar to the retouched photo Claus referenced.   It had red sides, black ends and roof, white lettering.  I don't recall if there were any reporting marks.

A "not a Steam Era Freight Car," perhaps?

--George Irwin

Re: Oscar Mayer Freight Car taken in 1931

G.J. Irwin
 

With respect to the Oscar Mayer car, if I recall correctly from my late father's accumulation of HO trains, the folks at Athearn did a car similar to the retouched photo Claus referenced.   It had red sides, black ends and roof, white lettering.  I don't recall if there were any reporting marks.

A "not a Steam Era Freight Car," perhaps?

--George Irwin

DT&I Postwar AAR Boxcar – Front Range Upgrade #2

Robert Chapman
 

Continuing to clean out the three-decade stash of unbuilt styrene undec kits. Front Range kit #4070 features 10-panel riveted sides, 8-foot door, diagonal panel roof, and R-3-4 ends; a prototype near-match is DT&I's #14300-14549 series (the prototype with early improved dreadnaught ends, the model the similar late version). 

As with other circa-1990 kits, the carbody is decent, but the detail parts are well below current standards. Upgrades include Kadee ladders/grabs/Ajax brakewheel, and Kato ASF A-3 trucks. The kit’s deep fishbelly sidesills were modified to match the prototype’s flat bolster-to-bolster profile. The prototype featured a Kerrigan runningboard; I substituted the similar Apex from Yarmouth. Decals are K4.Thanks to Craig Wilson, Tim O’Connor, and John Stanford for their photo and technical help.

Weathering gone wild! -- an attempt to recreate the prototype photo. Craig speculates that the car may have spent a day too many at one of DT&I’s on-line Ohio bagged clay plants.

Regards,
Bob Chapman

 

Re: NYC 19000 series caboose color

Peter Weiglin
 

Those of us who remember the classic wood NYC cabooses remember that they showed up in different shades of red (or even pink), depending on how long it had been since they were painted.  For many, it was a looong time since painting.

There was a prototype for any shade, somewhere.  Don't get too worked up over the "real" shade.

Re: NYC 19000 series caboose color

Dave Lawler
 

Thank you Mark. I have some Floquil Boxcar red and Reefer White in my old paint stash,
more than enough to paint a HO caboose. I guess I'm good to go.
Dave Lawler

Re: NYC 19000 series caboose color

Dave Lawler
 

Todd,
Thank you for the link to the NYC Historical Society file. In there they describe the color as a "reserved boxcar red".
I think that Mark Rossiter's suggestion for Floquil Boxcar red wit a touch of white is the best idea.
Dave Lawler

Re: Oscar Mayer Freight Car taken in 1931

mikefrommontanan
 

I agree with Mr. Stozrek's assertion that this is a modified image.  Perhaps done to show somebody what a proposed scheme would look like on a full size car.  It appears that a knock out image (type) was over the print when exposed.

Quicker than paint!

Michael Seitz
Missoula MT


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Re: Photo: Lifting A Flat Car (Undated)

mopacfirst
 

Dennis' explanation is most likely.

Wherever this crane is, it appears that its purpose is to lift stuff that's between the two crane rails, probably stuff that arrived by motor transport or perhaps offloaded from ships in the nearby harbor, move it between the legs of the crane support on the left and lower it on to freight cars.   The test lift was probably run in the opposite direction, picking up that flatcar and moving it across into the area between the crane legs.  You have to assume that they'd then put it back, but there would perhaps need to be more than those two men, who look like supervisors, to get it back on the rails.

Ron Merrick

Re: Photo: Lifting A Flat Car (Undated)

Lester Breuer
 

My opinion, Promotion to sell the crane and show an example of load it can lift.  In my opinion, the two men are not under the flat car being lifted.  A photo perspective.  My guess the person scanning the photo created the caption and it was his impression the men were under the flat car.
Lester Breuer

Re: Transformers and Runner to Skagit River Railway Powerhouse

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


Hi Richard and List Members,
 
I forwarded Richard's original email to a model railroader friend of mine - this friend worked for GE in the power transformer product area (in a number of locations but most notably in Pittsfield MA) for many years, and he is very knowlegable regarding both the transformer end of things and the rail transport end of things.
 
I'm tacking on his private reply to me since I think it might be of interest to folks on the list and will provide additional insights...
 
"Thanks for the photos and information about them.The paint color for the transformers was dark blue-grey, ANSI #24 and the bushings would be a chocolate brown color.  More recent transformers were painted light grey, ANSI #70 and the bushings were the same color.  These transformers look like single phase units, so there was a third one arriving, too.  I did not have any info on these units, but they were probably 230kV output to the BPA transmission lines.  Generator input was probably 13.8kV.  BPA transmitted the power to Seattle.  The GE logo on the side of the transformer was made of cast aluminum (I have one)".
 
Enjoy!
 
 
Claus Schlund
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, August 03, 2020 7:37 PM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Transformers and Runner to Skagit River Railway Powerhouse

Hi Richard,
 
Thanks for the great images.
 
The one depressed center flat car road number GE 40001, shown broadside on one of the photos, was a 90-ton car. I don't know the year it was built, but it is listed in my Dec 1930 ORER, so it dates back AT LEAST that far.
 
Claus Schlund
 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, July 31, 2020 7:04 PM
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Transformers and Runner to Skagit River Railway Powerhouse

Here is a sequence of views of transformers and runner being delivered on the Seattle City Light Skagit River Railway in early 1950's.

View 01 - Here we have Skagit River Railway center cab diesel No. 7 with covered hopper of cement for Ross Powerhouse construction, GN gondola, two General Electric drop center flats with transformers and Pennsylvania well car PRR 470031. Train is travelling from Rockport, WA which was the connection with the Great Northern to Newhalem which is the base of operations for the Skagit Power project.

View 02 - At Newhalem the cars were turned over to electric locomotives for the trip to Diablo Dam. Here is General Electric 40001 at Diablo and it will be transferred to the incline railway up Sourdough Mountain.

View 03 - All materials to build Diablo Dam as well as Ross Dam and powerhouse had to travel up this incline railway at Diablo. The platform travels a 68 degree slope and gains 313 feet in vertical distance and is raised and lowered by an electric winch. Only one accident occurred on the incline when a gear tooth broke causing the platform to crash to the bottom. At the time the platform had a hopper car of gravel and it flipped over killing a man who was hitching a ride. After this no one was allowed to ride the platform if a rail car was being transported at the same time.

View 04 - After passing the top of Diablo Dam an electric locomotive would spot the car to be loaded on a two car capacity barge for the trip up Diablo Lake. A winch lowered the car on to the barge and a tugboat moved the barge to Ross Dam which is upstream.

View 05 - Nice view of the barge being moved by the tugboat Ruby 2.

View 06 - Barge docked at the barge slip at Ross powerhouse.

View 07 - Finally the transformer at the Ross Powerhouse site. The winch can be seen and their was also a small gas locomotive for spotting cars.

Rich Wilkens

Re: Oscar Mayer Freight Car taken in 1931

Douglas Harding
 

Rob, most of the major meat packers owned soap making companies, so byproducts were shipped to those plants. Or they were sold to third party concerns who had use for them. Nothing was wasted. National Provisioner magazine is a good place to start for anything related to the meat packing industry. You can find it in many AG School libraries, I know Iowa State has a full collection. Early issues of National Provisioner are on line via Google. USDA Bulletins and publications related to the meat industry are also good. And most government publications are also on line.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert kirkham
Sent: Monday, August 3, 2020 11:53 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Oscar Mayer Freight Car taken in 1931

 

Thanks for the info you could provide Doug.  I’ve just spent a couple of enjoyable hours on-line looking for answers from the 20’s through 40’s, but I've found this will be a question that takes me to a library for publications I couldn’t find on line.  Not sure the libraries are open yet, but sometime soon I think.  

 

Rob

 

On Aug 3, 2020, at 7:48 PM, Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...> wrote:

 

I can’t answer that question. My interests focused on what cars came in and out of a slaughter house, and what did they contain or what was their function, mostly so I could fill out waybills. Additional information makes for a  good story during the clinic.

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert kirkham
Sent: Monday, August 3, 2020 8:02 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Oscar Mayer Freight Car taken in 1931

 

So I guess this leads to the next question: if you wash out all that lanolin, presumably the left over urine/lanolin also has industrial value?  

 

Does that go to a rendering plant?  Or fertilizer maker?  Or some other kind of chemical company?

 

Rob

 

 

On Aug 3, 2020, at 5:53 PM, BRIAN PAUL EHNI <bpehni@...> wrote:

 

You don’t think it’s washed several times in the process of making the sweater? Have you smelled pig urine when buying said sweaters? Likely not. 

Thanks!

Brian Ehni 

(Sent from my iPhone)




On Aug 3, 2020, at 7:39 PM, Kenneth Montero <va661midlo@...> wrote:



Another good reason to wash/dry clean newly purchased wool clothing before wearing it.

 

Ken Montreo

On 08/03/2020 8:35 PM Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...> wrote:

 

 

Oh you will regret. A prime use for hog urine was cleaning lanolin from raw wool. Think of that the next time you wear a wool sweater. It is also used in fertilizer.

 

Most blood was dried before shipping as blood is very corrosive to steel. Whole blood has to be shipped in glass lined tank cars. Blood was a rich source of protein used in animal feeds as well as in blood meal used as a fertilizer. Up to 30% is used in human consumption products, ie blood sausage, black pudding, baked goods, etc. Medicine and pharmaceuticals are another use.

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert kirkham
Sent: Monday, August 3, 2020 6:40 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Oscar Mayer Freight Car taken in 1931

 

OK, much as wonder if I will regret it, I have to ask: what was the market for blood, and what was the market for hogs urine?  I have packing plants on the line I model, bt have no insight about this tank car traffic.

 

Rob Kirkham

 

On Aug 3, 2020, at 4:31 PM, Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...> wrote:

 

Claus thank you. You are correct that is a Decker tank car, used for various fats, like lard, and for blood and hog urine. The tank cars were gone by the early 30s, replaced by leased units.


You cite two groups of Decker reefers, there were others.