Date   
Re: new TICHY freight car parts

Paul Woods
 

Ahem....from the Westerfield site:

"Made in Injection Molded Styrene. Not Resin"

Regards
Paul Woods

NYCSHS #7172


---- On Wed, 04 Mar 2020 05:05:45 +1300 Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...> wrote ----

Not styrene, but still available from Westerfield in resin:
https://id18538.securedata.net/westerfieldmodels.com/merchantmanager/product_info.php?products_id=667


Ben Hom


Re: new TICHY freight car parts

dahminator68
 

Hello Ben, Tim and all:  Actually the Westerfield Models #1171 Wine Door Lock set IS styrene, NOT Resin.

The sets are currently available on our website, as Ben pointed out.

Here is the link:

On Tuesday, March 3, 2020, 11:05:55 AM EST, Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...> wrote:


Tim O'Connor wrote:
"Now if we could just get Wine door locks in injection molded plastic."

Ralph Brown responded:
"I'd like to see Simonton operating gear as well, but I do have more than a few hoppers that could stand improved Wine door locks."

Not styrene, but still available from Westerfield in resin:
https://id18538.securedata.net/westerfieldmodels.com/merchantmanager/product_info.php?products_id=667


Ben Hom



Duryea Underframes (Was: Coupler Distance . . . )

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Friends,

Ed Bommer said (in part):

"The Duryea design reduced much of the stress from rough handling on the car body and its framing by isolating and spring-loading the center sill. A major problem with it was the need for special tooling and skills to repair it, for which not all railroads were equipped to handle. As Duryea under fames aged, increasing maintenance and repair work was required. They were banned from interchange service in the 1960's."

Banning Duryea underframes must have put a big dent in the fleets of some railroads and some private owners, probably hastening the end of older cars. Nearly all the D&RGW's 40' steel boxcars, for example, were Duryea-equipped, and some survived in MW service into the UP-era. The ATSF was also a big Duryea user, and there were a lot of Duryea-equipped URTX refrigerator cars. OTOH, the Western Maryland had numerous Duryea-equipped cabooses which survived until the end of caboose operations in the 1980s under the Chessie System. A few still survive at museums or for non-railroad uses, including one still in Staunton, Virginia which I was able to crawl under to shoot pictures of the underframe (when I was much younger and more agile!).

Yours Aye,

Garth Groff  🦆

Re: new TICHY freight car parts

Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi Ben,

Despite the many times as I've ordered things from Westerfield, I didn't know that. Thanks for bringing them to my attention. I'll definitely include some in my next order.

Pax,


Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com

-----Original Message-----
From: Benjamin Hom
Sent: Tuesday, March 3, 2020 11:05 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io ; main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] new TICHY freight car parts

Tim O'Connor wrote:
"Now if we could just get Wine door locks in injection molded plastic."

Ralph Brown responded:
"I'd like to see Simonton operating gear as well, but I do have more than a few hoppers that could stand improved Wine door locks."

Not styrene, but still available from Westerfield in resin:
https://id18538.securedata.net/westerfieldmodels.com/merchantmanager/product_info.php?products_id=667


Ben Hom

Re: coupler distance over car end

Edward
 

The back of the coupler head must be at least the distance of the draft gear spring travel to the striker plate on the end sill, about 3" to 4" or so.
Accurately modeled striker plates seem rare in all scales of  modeldom, with many installations relying on the Kadee coupler box lid tab to take its place.
The striker plate was a substantial steel casting against which the coupler head could press when forced, and not damage the car body end sill.

Photos CODECO and Erie 79000 show these castings riveted to the car's end sill.
Photo 394724366 shows a more modern update, in how striker plates are welded to the ends of their center sills. 
All show the same spacing between their faces and the back of the coupler head.

Coup03 shows the coupler mounting in a Duryea under frame.
Note the space between the back of the coupler head casting and the cracked striker plate on the center sill.
That space is about 3" to 4",  which was also common for cars having striker plates mounted to their end sills.
This striker plate face was damaged by too many hard couplings over the decades, being forced against the center sill carrier castings.
While the Duryea was a different type of underframe, couplers were mounted to it the same way as on other cars.

The tape measure shows a 6" space between that striker plate on the end of the center sill, and the center sill's end carriers on the car's end sill.
It measures 9" to the car' s end sheathing and end sill behind that.
This is 3", which is the thickness of those center sill end carrier castings.

On a Duryea underframe, the center sill is spring-loaded at the inner sides of the bolsters.
It slides back and forth under the car body upon impact.
The center sill travel has a 6" allowance at each end. 

The Duryea design reduced much of the stress from rough handling on the car body and its framing by isolating and spring-loading the center sill.
A major problem with it was the need for special tooling and skills to repair it, for which not all railroads were equipped to handle.
As Duryea under fames aged, increasing maintenance and repair work was required. They were banned from interchange service in the 1960's.

Ed Bommer
 

Re: coupler distance over car end

vapeurchapelon
 

Hello Dennis,
 
wow! This is GREAT information which helps a lot! Many thanks!
One problem is that most brass cars don't have a coupler box already in place but just a cut-short at a non-defined place center sill instead, and several models obviously have the threads for the coupler box set at a wrong place...
 
Johannes
 
Gesendet: Dienstag, 03. März 2020 um 16:30 Uhr
Von: "Dennis Storzek" <destorzek@...>
An: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Betreff: Re: [RealSTMFC] coupler distance over car end
Johannes,

You first need to determine where the center sills actually end. In North American practice in our era, the sills were typically capped by a massive casting known as the 'striker casting', its purpose being to receive the blow from the 'striker horn' on the coupler when under heavy impact, to keep the draft gear from being damaged. Rule of thumb for freight cars built after the mid thirties is this is 5'-6" from the truck kingpin. Most drawings and equipment diagrams dimension the truck centers, and most also dimension the length over strikers. Tabular data normally includes length over strikers. Note that the striker is usually several inches out from the end sill, but this dimension varies.

The ARA/AAR Type D coupler, in use from just before WWI, and the Type E, still the current standard, are 12" from 'pulling face', the inside of the knuckle, to the back of the striker horn. Steam era draft gear typically had 3" of traven, putting the pulling face 15" from the striker casting. Earlier MCB approved coupler designs were smaller, typically 9.25" from pulling face to striker horn, so cars so equipped couple closer together.

Dennis Storzek

Re: new TICHY freight car parts

Benjamin Hom
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:
"Now if we could just get Wine door locks in injection molded plastic."

Ralph Brown responded:
"I'd like to see Simonton operating gear as well, but I do have more than a few hoppers that could stand improved Wine door locks."

Not styrene, but still available from Westerfield in resin:
https://id18538.securedata.net/westerfieldmodels.com/merchantmanager/product_info.php?products_id=667


Ben Hom

Re: new TICHY freight car parts

Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi Tim,

I'd like to see Simonton operating gear as well, but I do have more than a few hoppers that could stand improved Wine door locks.

Pax,


Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com

-----Original Message-----
From: Tim O'Connor
Sent: Tuesday, March 3, 2020 10:49 AM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io ; bbfcl@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] new TICHY freight car parts


Just received this news of what appears to be an Enterprise locking
mechanism - perhaps the same as those that come with the USRA hopper?
I don't think it's been offered before. Now if we could just get Wine
door locks in injection molded plastic.

Tichy catalog #3085 according to the flyer

Tim O'



--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*

Photo: Wilson Meat Reefer WCLX 2572

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Wilson Meat Reefer WCLX 2572

Taken at Union Station Yard in Ogden, Utah in 2005 by R. J. Sorensen:

https://www.railpictures.net/photo/105932/

Car was built in 1957.

Good photo for modeling/weathering purposes.

The car ends appear to have been painted orange at one time and then painted with car cement as usually seen on roofs. Can anyone verify this?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

new TICHY freight car parts

Tim O'Connor
 

Just received this news of what appears to be an Enterprise locking
mechanism - perhaps the same as those that come with the USRA hopper?
I don't think it's been offered before. Now if we could just get Wine
door locks in injection molded plastic.

Tichy catalog #3085 according to the flyer

Tim O'



--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*

Re: coupler distance over car end

Dennis Storzek
 

Johannes,

You first need to determine where the center sills actually end. In North American practice in our era, the sills were typically capped by a massive casting known as the 'striker casting', its purpose being to receive the blow from the 'striker horn' on the coupler when under heavy impact, to keep the draft gear from being damaged. Rule of thumb for freight cars built after the mid thirties is this is 5'-6" from the truck kingpin. Most drawings and equipment diagrams dimension the truck centers, and most also dimension the length over strikers. Tabular data normally includes length over strikers. Note that the striker is usually several inches out from the end sill, but this dimension varies.

The ARA/AAR Type D coupler, in use from just before WWI, and the Type E, still the current standard, are 12" from 'pulling face', the inside of the knuckle, to the back of the striker horn. Steam era draft gear typically had 3" of traven, putting the pulling face 15" from the striker casting. Earlier MCB approved coupler designs were smaller, typically 9.25" from pulling face to striker horn, so cars so equipped couple closer together.

Dennis Storzek

coupler distance over car end

vapeurchapelon
 

Hello friends,

I have several cars where the coupling distance seems to be or definitely is too large, so I have to reposition the coupler box. I already use Kadee #153 couplers together with #178 box (where possible). My question is if there are any rules regarding the correct position = distance of coupler face over end beam or running board, or if I just could do as short as possible to be correct - just making sure that the coupler box front is gap-free with the end beam (which I doubt). Any help will be very appreciated.

Many thanks an greetings

Johannes
modeling the early post-war years up to about 1953

Re: Stock Cars NP 81745 & CBQ 56315 circa 1926

Hudson Leighton
 

http://www.nprha.org/NP%20AFE%20Index/NP_1923.pdf

page 15

Who knows, worn out trucks, had a bunch of 70 ton trucks in stock, had a customer taking about raising elephants.

I will see what the AFE file says when I scan it in a couple of months.

-Hudson

Re: Stock Cars NP 81745 & CBQ 56315 circa 1926

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Does anybody else think 70-ton trucks under NP 81745 sounds a bit odd? 40-ton trucks would be fine for a stock car. Is this a misprint, or would there be a reason for such heavy trucks under such a light car?

Yours Aye,

Garth Groff  🦆


On Mon, Mar 2, 2020 at 1:10 PM Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:

Nice photo! The CB&Q car looks pretty new.

 

BTW, I see 8-28 in the lower left corner under the sill at the door. That might be the photo month/year.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Hudson Leighton
Sent: Monday, March 2, 2020 10:38 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Stock Cars NP 81745 & CBQ 56315 circa 1926

 

Stock Cars NP 81745 & CBQ 56315 circa 1926

NP 81745 blt. ?? as NP 90145, in 1923 under AFE 5118-23 was renumbered to NP 81745 and upgraded with 70 ton trucks, in 1933 under AFE 5024-33 it was dismantled.

Re: Stock Cars NP 81745 & CBQ 56315 circa 1926

Chuck Soule
 

The "A" on the stock yard building in the background suggests the photo is cropped from a NP Joint Facilities Book.  The date of 8-28 in the lower right corner is consistent with the period the books were prepared.  I believe there may be a copy of the volume covering the Billings joint facilities at the railway museum in Duluth.  The facility would have been documented if it was owned by the NP but shared under a joint facilities agreement with the CB&Q and/or GN.

I don't believe the Jt. Fac. volumes at Pacific Northwest Railway Archive include Billings.

Chuck Soule

Re: Stock Cars NP 81745 & CBQ 56315 circa 1926

Nelson Moyer
 

Thanks for posting. Looks like the steel frame is newly painted without painting the slats. Never seen that.

On Mar 2, 2020, at 11:57 AM, Hudson Leighton <hudsonl@...> wrote:

This picture seems to have disappeared here is a reload.

-Hudson
<34041-034 NP 81745 CBQ 56315.jpg>

Twin Cities Mpls St Paul Modelers Retreat - (an RPM by any other name)

np328
 

 Date March 13, 14th of 2020, Friday late afternoon into the evening, Saturday morning and afternoon. 
 Location: 11810  52nd Ave North, Plymouth, MN - same location as last few years. 
 Pre Registration: $20 includes lunch, which prior has been a great perk.  
 You may e-mail registration and transfer fund via PayPal to mhry19@... 
 Pre-Registration deadline is Monday the 9th.  or $25 at the door (which IMHO is still a good deal).
 Several local layouts will be open for tours. 

Ken Zieska is the organizer available at the above <mhry19@...> e-mail address. Also at http://www.tcdnmra.org/ 
I'll see if I can get a list of presenters and presentations out ASAP. 
                                                                                                                                Jim Dick - Roseville, MN 

Re: Stock Cars NP 81745 & CBQ 56315 circa 1926

Hudson Leighton
 

This picture seems to have disappeared here is a reload.

-Hudson

Re: Stock Cars NP 81745 & CBQ 56315 circa 1926

Rupert Gamlen
 

CB&Q 56315 was built by the Burlington at its Galesburg shops in 1926-27, part of class SM-18A group numbered 56200-56699. They were constructed using National Dump centre sills from retired GA-12 and GE-2 gondolas which had been built in 1914. Some were later fitted with an upper deck, signified by the letter “D” above the road number.

Rupert Gamlen
Auckland NZ

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Eric Hansmann
Sent: Tuesday, 3 March 2020 7:10 am
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Stock Cars NP 81745 & CBQ 56315 circa 1926

 

Nice photo! The CB&Q car looks pretty new.

 

BTW, I see 8-28 in the lower left corner under the sill at the door. That might be the photo month/year.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Hudson Leighton
Sent: Monday, March 2, 2020 10:38 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Stock Cars NP 81745 & CBQ 56315 circa 1926

 

Stock Cars NP 81745 & CBQ 56315 circa 1926

NP 81745 blt. ?? as NP 90145, in 1923 under AFE 5118-23 was renumbered to NP 81745 and upgraded with 70 ton trucks, in 1933 under AFE 5024-33 it was dismantled.

_._,_._,_

Re: Stock Cars NP 81745 & CBQ 56315 circa 1926

William Hirt
 

CB&Q 36' Stock Car Class SM18-A (Series 56200-56699) was built in 1928 by CB&Q Galesburg. The lettering on the car looks fairly new in the photo, so it maybe not long after it was built.

Bill Hirt

On 3/2/2020 10:38 AM, Hudson Leighton wrote:
Stock Cars NP 81745 & CBQ 56315 circa 1926

NP 81745 blt. ?? as NP 90145, in 1923 under AFE 5118-23 was renumbered to NP 81745 and upgraded with 70 ton trucks, in 1933 under AFE 5024-33 it was dismantled.
_._,_._,_