Date   

Re: Pullman Standard cushioned underframe question for PS-1 cars

Brent Greer
 

Thanks Ed! (I was afraid that this would end up being something too challenging for me to model - looks like that might be the case here)

I will see if I have the issue of Mainline Modeler in my back issue library collection. 

 Brent

Dr. J. Brent Greer


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Ed Hawkins <hawk0621@...>
Sent: Tuesday, July 7, 2020 5:46 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Pullman Standard cushioned underframe question for PS-1 cars
 


On Jul 7, 2020, at 4:01 PM, Brent Greer <studegator@...> wrote:

Friend Jim Brewer recently shared some information on various lots of PS-1 boxcars ordered by the Norfolk and Western.  One of these was for a group of only 5 cars, identified in the data as PS Lot 8160D  for five cars with the cushioned under frames.  The N&W car number series is 53995-53999 and the only information on the diagram is "sliding sill 10" rubber cushion."   My question for the knowledgeable experts in our group is "What type of cushioned under frames were these?"   Did PS have their own proprietary system, or was this something like a Duryea under frame?   And of course, I am interested in how best to model this under frame.


Brent,
It was a Pullman-Standard proprietary design in which 100 cars were built in 2-54 & sold to 8 different railroads (lots 8160A thru H). A good source is Jim Kinkaid’s article in January 2002 Mainline Modeler. Included is a schematic drawing to illustrate how it functions.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: Photo: V-1 Weapon On MP Flat Car 8171

Matthew Hurst
 

There is an 88mm flak gun behind it to. 

Awesome. 

Matthew Hurst 
PRRT&HS #6799
PRRT&HS modeling committee 


On Jul 7, 2020, at 1:40 PM, Richard Wilkens <railsnw123@...> wrote:

As this is a photo from a newspaper archives that doctoring is typical for newspapers of that period. This gave a stronger contrast to the photos when printed. You will see the edges of the truck side frame has been done as well as the missile cradle.

Richard Wilkens


Re: Shipping sugar cane by rail...

Randy Hees
 

There were a number of sugar cane car designs... some dump, some unload via a crane and grapple.  Many were narrow gauge. They were built by a number of builders... including Magor, Brill, and lots of over seas providers like Ducaville.  Car designs used seem to follow regional lines... so the cars in Florida are likely all similar while those in Cuba or Hawaii or Australia will look different.

Randy Hees


Re: Pullman Standard cushioned underframe question for PS-1 cars

Ed Hawkins
 



On Jul 7, 2020, at 4:01 PM, Brent Greer <studegator@...> wrote:

Friend Jim Brewer recently shared some information on various lots of PS-1 boxcars ordered by the Norfolk and Western.  One of these was for a group of only 5 cars, identified in the data as PS Lot 8160D  for five cars with the cushioned under frames.  The N&W car number series is 53995-53999 and the only information on the diagram is "sliding sill 10" rubber cushion."   My question for the knowledgeable experts in our group is "What type of cushioned under frames were these?"   Did PS have their own proprietary system, or was this something like a Duryea under frame?   And of course, I am interested in how best to model this under frame.


Brent,
It was a Pullman-Standard proprietary design in which 100 cars were built in 2-54 & sold to 8 different railroads (lots 8160A thru H). A good source is Jim Kinkaid’s article in January 2002 Mainline Modeler. Included is a schematic drawing to illustrate how it functions.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: fixing yellowed decals

John Sykes III
 

Sometimes it works and other times, it makes things worse.  Instead of yellow, it turns the decal brown.  This is an attempted fix of last resort.  Probably has to do with the formula of the lacquer in the decal backing.

-- John


Re: Pullman Standard cushioned underframe question for PS-1 cars

Tim O'Connor
 


I will guess that it's the same 10" cushioning applied to a tiny number of Western Pacific box cars (e.g. WP 1953).

These really early cushion underframes have not been documented much in the hobby literature. The cars were built
before the SP-SRI "Hydracushion" design, or the Pullman "Hydroframe", or Evans, or other cushioned underframe designs.

I modeled the WP car with an extended coupler pocket. :-)   What else is there to do when there is no drawing?

Tim O'


On 7/7/2020 5:01 PM, Brent Greer wrote:

Friend Jim Brewer recently shared some information on various lots of PS-1 boxcars ordered by the Norfolk and Western.  One of these was for a group of only 5 cars, identified in the data as PS Lot 8160D  for five cars with the cushioned under frames.  The N&W car number series is 53995-53999 and the only information on the diagram is "sliding sill 10" rubber cushion."   My question for the knowledgeable experts in our group is "What type of cushioned under frames were these?"   Did PS have their own proprietary system, or was this something like a Duryea under frame?   And of course, I am interested in how best to model this under frame.


Any and all help appreciated,

Brent


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Extreme Tank Car Modeling

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Bob;

 

Important point.  I have looked at so many wreck photos in archives, I completely understand many RRs decisions to elevate and get away from that interface.  Those photos we recently shared of people wrecking their cars/trucks into parked freight cars give us some great freight car shots, but also how dangerous the environment they worked in was/is.

 

Elden Gatwood

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, July 7, 2020 4:38 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Extreme Tank Car Modeling

 

There are a lot of wreck photos, some with tank cars, on the Oklahoma Historical Society website. And so many car vs. train wreck photos it's amazing that the state wasn't completely depopulated.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: fixing yellowed decals

Tim O'Connor
 


Thanks Ben, that is a GOOD tip to know. I do have a few sets of yellowed decals and I will do that to
see if it works for me.


On 7/7/2020 4:52 PM, Benjamin Hom wrote:
Tim O'Connor wrote:
"On Facebook a couple weeks ago someone posted pictures of BRASS models with slightly yellowed
decals they wanted to correct. As an experiment the person placed the model in direct sunlight and left
it in the spot for 36 hours (I assume in a window in the house) and then turned it around and did the same
for the other side of the car. His before and after pictures showed that the yellowing completely disappeared!

Have you ever heard of this before? Any theory or idea why sunshine exposure would correct the color?
The models were Overland factory painted covered hoppers."

This is a well-known tip in the scale modeler community - place yellowed decals in a Ziploc bag and tape it to a window exposed to direct sunlight.  It's probably UV that does the work.


Ben Hom


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Pullman Standard cushioned underframe question for PS-1 cars

Brent Greer
 

Friend Jim Brewer recently shared some information on various lots of PS-1 boxcars ordered by the Norfolk and Western.  One of these was for a group of only 5 cars, identified in the data as PS Lot 8160D  for five cars with the cushioned under frames.  The N&W car number series is 53995-53999 and the only information on the diagram is "sliding sill 10" rubber cushion."   My question for the knowledgeable experts in our group is "What type of cushioned under frames were these?"   Did PS have their own proprietary system, or was this something like a Duryea under frame?   And of course, I am interested in how best to model this under frame.


Any and all help appreciated,

Brent 


Re: What kind of Brake Setup is this?

Jack Burgess
 

It might be a variation of this one (attached). The ratchet gear setup made it easier for a brakeman to set the brakes.

 

Jack Burgess

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Kemal Mumcu via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, July 7, 2020 10:58 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] What kind of Brake Setup is this?

 

Hi,

I'm building a TH&B 36' boxcar and these cars have a particular kind of brake gear I haven't seen before. K brakes were being used on the underframe and this strange brakewheel brace on the B end. Interestingly, there was no brake wheel platform to speak of. Brakewheel shaft also looks square.

Anyone know the name of this setup?

Colin Meikle


Re: fixing yellowed decals

Benjamin Hom
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:
"On Facebook a couple weeks ago someone posted pictures of BRASS models with slightly yellowed
decals they wanted to correct. As an experiment the person placed the model in direct sunlight and left
it in the spot for 36 hours (I assume in a window in the house) and then turned it around and did the same
for the other side of the car. His before and after pictures showed that the yellowing completely disappeared!

Have you ever heard of this before? Any theory or idea why sunshine exposure would correct the color?
The models were Overland factory painted covered hoppers."

This is a well-known tip in the scale modeler community - place yellowed decals in a Ziploc bag and tape it to a window exposed to direct sunlight.  It's probably UV that does the work.


Ben Hom


fixing yellowed decals

Tim O'Connor
 


On Facebook a couple weeks ago someone posted pictures of BRASS models with slightly yellowed
decals they wanted to correct. As an experiment the person placed the model in direct sunlight and left
it in the spot for 36 hours (I assume in a window in the house) and then turned it around and did the same
for the other side of the car. His before and after pictures showed that the yellowing completely disappeared!

Have you ever heard of this before? Any theory or idea why sunshine exposure would correct the color?
The models were Overland factory painted covered hoppers.

Tim O'Connor




--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: What kind of Brake Setup is this?

mark_landgraf
 

Generically speaking, in order to gain leverage, a gear box was used. This was most often seen on flat cars with drop shaft brake wheels in a post K brake era. 

Could we be looking at a gearbox mounted up high?

Mark Landgraf


On Tue, Jul 7, 2020 at 1:57 PM, Kemal Mumcu via groups.io
<kemal_mumcu@...> wrote:
Hi,

I'm building a TH&B 36' boxcar and these cars have a particular kind of brake gear I haven't seen before. K brakes were being used on the underframe and this strange brakewheel brace on the B end. Interestingly, there was no brake wheel platform to speak of. Brakewheel shaft also looks square.

Anyone know the name of this setup?

Colin Meikle


Re: Extreme Tank Car Modeling

Bob Chaparro
 

There are a lot of wreck photos, some with tank cars, on the Oklahoma Historical Society website. And so many car vs. train wreck photos it's amazing that the state wasn't completely depopulated.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: Looking for tips on transferring Clover House dry transfers to decal paper

Tim O'Connor
 


tape down the dry transfer over the spot you want (so it doesn't move)

burnish with nylon or other plastic tool

apply Microscale liquid decal film

allow to dry

If you are using the alphabet sets, and want to keep letters straight, make a line in the paper with a
knife or other tool and stay on that line. burnish - coat - dry as above.





On 7/7/2020 12:46 PM, Steve and Barb Hile wrote:

I have always struggled with using dry transfer products.  What kind of tips can anyone offer as to making successful transfers of the Clover House lettering to decal paper?  Proper burnishing techniques, etc.?

 

Thanks in advance,

Steve Hile



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


SAL composite gon

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
SAL composite gon
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 


Re: Apparently, Boston & Maine boxcars made it to Florida

Bill Welch
 

Why would they not?

Bill Welch


Re: Photo: Bailed Cotton On Flat Cars

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Jon,

That's not a pistol, it is a revolver. There is a difference. I'm no expert on guns, but it looks old, and might even be Civil War-era. 

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  

On Tue, Jul 7, 2020 at 12:08 PM Jon Miller <atsfus@...> wrote:
On 7/7/2020 8:43 AM, Bob Chaparro via groups.io wrote:
Photo: Bailed Cotton On Flat Cars

    Interesting that the fellow on the far right has a pistol in his belt.  I'm wondering what this picture is really showing?

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
SPROG User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: Question - Fees For Refrigerator Cars

Tony Thompson
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:

"could not possibly have cared less" - That must have changed soon after 1960 when the PFE went in big for intermodal
reefer trailers (incl Flexi-Vans) for that very reason - to be able to earn money in both directions. But it didn't really work out
and the experiment ended around the same time period as the end of ice service.

  You are right, Tim, the entire business model for the PFE trailers was to capture westward loads in addition to produce eastward. I was referring to reefers, both ice and mechanical.

Tony Thompson




Re: Question - Fees For Refrigerator Cars

Tim O'Connor
 


"
could not possibly have cared less" - That must have changed soon after 1960 when the PFE went in big for intermodal
reefer trailers (incl Flexi-Vans) for that very reason - to be able to earn money in both directions. But it didn't really work out
and the experiment ended around the same time period as the end of ice service.


On 7/7/2020 2:55 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:
       All major reefer operators had agents in big cities to keep in contact with yardmasters and remind them to get those empties home. A PFE manager I interviewed said such an agent would call daily, with a list of the PFE cars in each yard in his territory. PFE, getting paid mileage loaded or empty, and often facing tight car supply in their loading territory, could not possibly have cared less about westbound loads.

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts