Date   

Re: B&O Tank Car Explosion

 

Thank you, Garth. While I can't identify the location, someone with a good eye for B&O perhaps can. A clue - there is a telltale and a tunnel portal visible in the distance. Note the curvature of the tracks and the shape of the cut. Another thought about the car; look at the slope to the right. It appears that either the car fell down the hill or perhaps impacted the hill after being thrown from somewhere, and then came to rest in the base of the cut. Judging from the debris, perhaps it broke through a retaining wall, pushing the timbers and dirt/stone into the cut. Not sure. An interesting mystery!
-- 
Ben Sullivan
Brookeville, MD


Re: Jerry Hamsmith kits

nyc3001 .
 

Thanks guys. I'm glad to know the info about Jerry's kits as opposed to the Sunshine kits.


Re: Photo: St.L.K.&NW Boxcar At Brick Works

Gary Roe
 

Bob,

That is St. Louis, Keokuk & Northwestern.

gary roe
quincy, illinois



On Saturday, July 4, 2020, 6:29:10 PM CDT, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:


Photo: St.L.K.&NW Boxcar At Brick Works

A circa late 1890 to early 1900s photo from the Iowa University Libraries:

https://digital.lib.uiowa.edu/islandora/object/ui%3Ajohncalvin_261

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

Interesting end detail on the boxcar.

The car was part of the Burlington system. I'm guessing the reporting marks stood for St. Louis, Kansas & North Western.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: St.L.K.&NW Boxcar At Brick Works

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: St.L.K.&NW Boxcar At Brick Works

A circa late 1890 to early 1900s photo from the Iowa University Libraries:

https://digital.lib.uiowa.edu/islandora/object/ui%3Ajohncalvin_261

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

Interesting end detail on the boxcar.

The car was part of the Burlington system. I'm guessing the reporting marks stood for St. Louis, Kansas & North Western.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: CB&Q Hopper Cars

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: CB&Q Hopper Cars

A 1956 photo from the Iowa University Libraries taken at Flagler, Iowa:

https://digital.lib.uiowa.edu/islandora/object/ui%3Avandermaaseaj_1435

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

Photo is a little grainy.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: What kind of Steam Era Freight Car is used to ship...

Jared Harper
 

For years Georgia was the largest producer of Kaolin.

Jared Harper
Athens, GA




Re: What kind of Steam Era Freight Car is used to ship...

Mont Switzer
 

Jeff,

 

Let me qualify this response.  I lived near Akron for over 10 years and was involved in handling outbound rubber products from all "tire shops," where tires were "built."  This was in the 1970's.

 

Outbound tires by the carload probably went to vehicle manufacturers and distribution warehouses.  Shipments of tires, cartons of tubes, and other boxed accessories were handled as LCL in boxcars and LTL in trucks.    

 

Inbound bales of raw rubber would have been received in boxcars from Akron, most likely from roads that served Akron (AC&Y, B&O, ERIE, PRR).  The AC&Y connected with the NYC, NKP and DT&I among others.  All loading was done by hand as tire handling had yet to be automated.

 

You are right about carbon black being handled in covered hoppers, but in your era some carbon black was still shipped in bags loaded in boxcars.  It depends on the process using the carbon black at the time.

 

In Akron a lot of coal was received for the plant boilers. 

 

There were always lots of chemical tank cars around.  Although I'm sure how many of them served the chemical industry that was developed by the rubber companies, the shops probably consumed some chemicals in converting raw rubber to tires and other rubber products.

 

Akron always smelled like rubber, but nowadays no tires are being built in Akron and therefore no distinctive rubber smell.

 

Mont Switzer 


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] on behalf of Aley, Jeff A [Jeff.A.Aley@...]
Sent: Saturday, July 04, 2020 1:22 PM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] What kind of Steam Era Freight Car is used to ship...

Hi Folks,

 

               The Goodyear tire plant in Topeka, KS (and other tire factories) needed to receive raw materials.  For some, the method of transport is obvious to me (bales of rubber arrived in box cars; carbon black granules arrived in covered hoppers).  For others, I am not so sure.

 

They used kaolin (for Al2O3).  Would this be handled as a slurry in tank cars or was it in bags or drums in box cars?  I’m guessing the latter, but… ?

 

They used steel wire for the “bead” of the tire.  Would this be in box cars, or giant spools on flat cars / gons?  As you can tell, I’m pretty ignorant about this.

 

               FWIW, the factory produced about 10 boxcars of tires per day in the steam era.

 

Thanks,

 

-Jeff

 

 

 

 


Re: What kind of Steam Era Freight Car is used to ship...

mel perry
 

garth:
trains did an article sbout kaolin way
back  in the 90's
mel perry


On Sat, Jul 4, 2020, 3:12 PM Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...> wrote:
Jeff,

Kaolin was often shipped dry and loose in boxcars until slurry shipment in tank cars became common. I remember seeing it, or something similar, being unloaded from a Seaboard boxcar with a Bob Cat around 1982. This was happening at a team track on the Norfolk & Portsmouth Belt Line.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Sat, Jul 4, 2020 at 1:22 PM Aley, Jeff A <Jeff.A.Aley@...> wrote:

Hi Folks,

 

               The Goodyear tire plant in Topeka, KS (and other tire factories) needed to receive raw materials.  For some, the method of transport is obvious to me (bales of rubber arrived in box cars; carbon black granules arrived in covered hoppers).  For others, I am not so sure.

 

They used kaolin (for Al2O3).  Would this be handled as a slurry in tank cars or was it in bags or drums in box cars?  I’m guessing the latter, but… ?

 

They used steel wire for the “bead” of the tire.  Would this be in box cars, or giant spools on flat cars / gons?  As you can tell, I’m pretty ignorant about this.

 

               FWIW, the factory produced about 10 boxcars of tires per day in the steam era.

 

Thanks,

 

-Jeff

 

 

 

 


Re: What kind of Steam Era Freight Car is used to ship...

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Jeff,

Kaolin was often shipped dry and loose in boxcars until slurry shipment in tank cars became common. I remember seeing it, or something similar, being unloaded from a Seaboard boxcar with a Bob Cat around 1982. This was happening at a team track on the Norfolk & Portsmouth Belt Line.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Sat, Jul 4, 2020 at 1:22 PM Aley, Jeff A <Jeff.A.Aley@...> wrote:

Hi Folks,

 

               The Goodyear tire plant in Topeka, KS (and other tire factories) needed to receive raw materials.  For some, the method of transport is obvious to me (bales of rubber arrived in box cars; carbon black granules arrived in covered hoppers).  For others, I am not so sure.

 

They used kaolin (for Al2O3).  Would this be handled as a slurry in tank cars or was it in bags or drums in box cars?  I’m guessing the latter, but… ?

 

They used steel wire for the “bead” of the tire.  Would this be in box cars, or giant spools on flat cars / gons?  As you can tell, I’m pretty ignorant about this.

 

               FWIW, the factory produced about 10 boxcars of tires per day in the steam era.

 

Thanks,

 

-Jeff

 

 

 

 


What kind of Steam Era Freight Car is used to ship...

Aley, Jeff A
 

Hi Folks,

 

               The Goodyear tire plant in Topeka, KS (and other tire factories) needed to receive raw materials.  For some, the method of transport is obvious to me (bales of rubber arrived in box cars; carbon black granules arrived in covered hoppers).  For others, I am not so sure.

 

They used kaolin (for Al2O3).  Would this be handled as a slurry in tank cars or was it in bags or drums in box cars?  I’m guessing the latter, but… ?

 

They used steel wire for the “bead” of the tire.  Would this be in box cars, or giant spools on flat cars / gons?  As you can tell, I’m pretty ignorant about this.

 

               FWIW, the factory produced about 10 boxcars of tires per day in the steam era.

 

Thanks,

 

-Jeff

 

 

 

 


Photo: Flood Damaged PFE Reefers

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Flood Damaged PFE Reefers

A 1933 photo from the UCLA Library:

https://dl.library.ucla.edu/islandora/object/edu.ucla.library.specialCollections.losAngelesDailyNews%3A1054

This photo can be enlarges quite a bit. Photo editing software brings out the details.

Description: "Wreckage of train tracks and Southern Pacific box cars [sic] after record-breaking rainfall in southern California. December 31, 1933."

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit.

The nearest reefer appears to be PFE 9544. That would make it an R-30-5 reefer, one of 3,021 cars (series 7101-10121) built in 1909-1911 by Pullman.

Notice this car has a single grab iron on the near end side. With regard to safety appliances, interchange rules required an additional grab iron on house cars, hopper cars, and high side gondola cars built new or rebuilt on or after August 1, 1933.

Notice how some of the siding has been stripped from the sides of the cars.

Additional photo:

https://dl.library.ucla.edu/islandora/object/edu.ucla.library.specialCollections.losAngelesDailyNews%3A1053

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Carbon Black drawings?

Bud Rindfleisch
 

Richard,
    Thanks for that info. Passing it on for my friend to look up and one other member of this group has sent some drawings and pics as well. Sure appreciate the efforts from this  group of modelers!
     Bud Rindfleisch


D&RGW kits are now online

Pierre Oliver
 

See the blog post
http://elgincarshops.blogspot.com/2020/07/a-wee-bit-premature.html

--
Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com


Re: Carbon Black drawings?

Richard Townsend
 

The May 1993 Mainline Modeler has plans for a carbon black car. These are the earlier 3,000 cubic foot type. There also was an article by Eric Stevens in an early MR that has VERY basic plans and was reprinted in the Easy to Build Model Railroad Freight Cars book from Kalmbach (1971).

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Bud Rindfleisch <BlackDiamondRR@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Jul 2, 2020 3:02 pm
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Carbon Black drawings?

Can anyone point me to plans or drawings for a carbon black hopper? Asking for a friend who wants to scratchbuild one in S scale.
     Thanks in advance,
      Bud Rindfleisch


Re: SnT 2020 Underframes

Mont Switzer
 

Thanks John.  Will be watching for it.  Mont Switzer 



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: John Barry <northbaylines@...>
Date: 7/3/20 12:46 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: Shake-N-Take <shake-n-take@groups.io>, STMFC <main@realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] SnT 2020 Underframes

Good news for the thirteen folks that identified themselves in need of an underframe for the 2020 Shake and Take Bx-34 project:  your underframes are the mail for priority mail delivery.  This still leaves seven folks who received kits at CCB that are still missing their underframes, but I have no clue who you are.  

John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA

707-490-9696 

PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736


Re: Photo: L&N End-Door Boxcar

Steven D Johnson
 

Photos attached of 2 other cars from the group.

 

Steve Johnson

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Friday, July 03, 2020 1:39 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: L&N End-Door Boxcar

 

Photo: L&N End-Door Boxcar

A Chuck Zeiler photo:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/chuckzeiler/38481886355/in/album-72157656279726732/

Click to enlarge photo.

Built 12-1940. Original number series 99800 to 99999.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: DUPX 1406

Dave Parker
 

Of course Tony.  My comment implied a question: was there some reason that DuPont would have had the cars built with what, at that time, would have been about as big a dome as you could find on a 10,000-gal car?

Turns out there was (from the 1926 ICC Supplement No. 2 to the 1924 "Transportation of Explosives...." regs) :



--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: DUPX 1406

Richard Townsend
 

The dome size is a great clue. In the 1955 tank car tariff I find six cars with 454 gallon domes of 10,000 gallon capacity, four at 10,603+ (numbers 2250, 2251, 2254, and 4147) and two at 10,541+ (8009 and 9305). I wonder if any of them were formerly 1406 or its brethren.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: David via groups.io <jaydeet2001@...>
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Sent: Fri, Jul 3, 2020 2:34 pm
Subject: [RealSTMFC] DUPX 1406

The 1936 Tank Car Tariff has a DUPX series 1400-1409, approximately
10,000 gallons capacity with a 454 gallon dome. There are no cars of
like dimensions in 1955, so it is likely DuPont sold or transferred this
group at some point.

David Thompson





Re: DUPX 1406

Tony Thompson
 

Dave Parker wrote:

It's also in my 1930 ORER, class TMU, for ethyl chloride service.  That's quite a big dome; I'd have to dig into the ICC regs from the 1930s to see if/why the properties of EC mandated such an expansion volume.

      Many cars with bigger domes were simply "buyer choice," as the regulations only set a minimum dome volume.

Tony Thompson




Re: DUPX 1406

Dave Parker
 

It's also in my 1930 ORER, class TMU, for ethyl chloride service.  That's quite a big dome; I'd have to dig into the ICC regs from the 1930s to see if/why the properties of EC mandated such an expansion volume.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA