Date   
Re: Stencil: Heavy Repairs

Michael Gross
 

And interesting to note the hooks above the trucks for attaching Keeley journal box cooling cans.  In an earlier post, someone had remarked that The Illinois Central often equipped freight cars with these hooks for a time.
--
Michael Gross
Pasadena, CA

Re: [External] [RealSTMFC] freight car roster shots

naptownprr
 

Good looking models, Eric.  Nice weathering


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Eric Hansmann <eric@...>
Sent: Wednesday, December 11, 2019 8:10 AM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io; Proto-Layouts@groups.io; ResinFreightCarBuilders@groups.io
Subject: [External] [RealSTMFC] freight car roster shots
 
This message was sent from a non-IU address. Please exercise caution when clicking links or opening attachments from external sources.

Taking roster shots of your completed freight cars can document your fleet as it grows. I get caught up with several models recently and posted some thoughts on the process in my latest blog post.



Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

Re: Assembling Truss Rods

al.kresse
 

Beautiful . . . . such patience!  I gave up on O-scale being too small to work with . . . ugh!

Al Kresse

On December 11, 2019 at 7:31 AM Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:

CAUTION: Slotted Screws Visible

I have started rigging the truss rod system for my CB&Q model’s underframe. I use .015-brass wire for the rods so prior to gluing the Queen Posts in place I used a new Single Edge Razor Blade to widen the slots in the Grandt Line parts, carefully cleaving away hair width slivers of styrene on each of the sixteen parts. This took about three hours with frequent checks to make sure the .015-wire would nest in the slot. Next I drilled #77 holes in floor just inside the bolsters so one end of the .015 wire could pass through the floor.

I did the interior pair first, bending a section of wire at about 75° on the end that goes through the floor and putting it through the hole I had drilled. Then I let the wire sit in the Queen Post’s slot. Resting my small Tamiya pliers against the Post I made a slight bend. Inevitably I had to adjust this bend until the wire now rests in both Posts to achieve the exact bend. I had already measured the distance between the Posts with my Mitutoyo Digimatic Caliper and then divided this calculation by two to determine the midpoint. I used this calculation to trim the wire. Then I repeated the process for the other truss rod section.

Over the years I have accumulated a few packets of Grandt Line Brass Turnbuckles, These are very nicely detailed—albeit very small—parts. Because cyanoacrylate or CA is an effective glue in this situation, it is main reason I use brass wire with these parts. After I have made two good truss rods I trim each one just enough to create a small gap so that I can see through the turnbuckle. Once happy with each brass wire section, I filed each end to rough them up and then put them back in place resting on their respective Queen Post. Next I slipped the turnbuckle back on and make sure it is oriented so I can see through it. When I am happy, I apply a tiny drop of CA to the Queen Post/Brass Wire joints and to only one end of the turnbuckle, creating a slip joint. After these three joints have cured, I bent the wire ends locking them in the slightly oversized holes. With three glued joints and three that are not glued, this assembly can withstand a fair amount deflection without anything breaking.

My goal is to align each of the turnbuckles so that I can slip a piece of scale scrap lumber through the turnbuckles, hopefully all eight but if not four on each side. (As I was taking the photos clouds were playing with the Sun changing the light so I included extras showing the turnbuckles in different lighting.)


Bill Welch


 

freight car roster shots

Eric Hansmann
 

Taking roster shots of your completed freight cars can document your fleet as it grows. I get caught up with several models recently and posted some thoughts on the process in my latest blog post.



Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

Assembling Truss Rods

Bill Welch
 

CAUTION: Slotted Screws Visible

I have started rigging the truss rod system for my CB&Q model’s underframe. I use .015-brass wire for the rods so prior to gluing the Queen Posts in place I used a new Single Edge Razor Blade to widen the slots in the Grandt Line parts, carefully cleaving away hair width slivers of styrene on each of the sixteen parts. This took about three hours with frequent checks to make sure the .015-wire would nest in the slot. Next I drilled #77 holes in floor just inside the bolsters so one end of the .015 wire could pass through the floor.

I did the interior pair first, bending a section of wire at about 75° on the end that goes through the floor and putting it through the hole I had drilled. Then I let the wire sit in the Queen Post’s slot. Resting my small Tamiya pliers against the Post I made a slight bend. Inevitably I had to adjust this bend until the wire now rests in both Posts to achieve the exact bend. I had already measured the distance between the Posts with my Mitutoyo Digimatic Caliper and then divided this calculation by two to determine the midpoint. I used this calculation to trim the wire. Then I repeated the process for the other truss rod section.

Over the years I have accumulated a few packets of Grandt Line Brass Turnbuckles, These are very nicely detailed—albeit very small—parts. Because cyanoacrylate or CA is an effective glue in this situation, it is main reason I use brass wire with these parts. After I have made two good truss rods I trim each one just enough to create a small gap so that I can see through the turnbuckle. Once happy with each brass wire section, I filed each end to rough them up and then put them back in place resting on their respective Queen Post. Next I slipped the turnbuckle back on and make sure it is oriented so I can see through it. When I am happy, I apply a tiny drop of CA to the Queen Post/Brass Wire joints and to only one end of the turnbuckle, creating a slip joint. After these three joints have cured, I bent the wire ends locking them in the slightly oversized holes. With three glued joints and three that are not glued, this assembly can withstand a fair amount deflection without anything breaking.

My goal is to align each of the turnbuckles so that I can slip a piece of scale scrap lumber through the turnbuckles, hopefully all eight but if not four on each side. (As I was taking the photos clouds were playing with the Sun changing the light so I included extras showing the turnbuckles in different lighting.)


Bill Welch

Re: Building GN and CB&Q Truss Rod 40-Foot Boxcars

Paul Doggett
 

Bill
You are not on your own using slotted screws I us BA screws as US screws are not readily available over here, BA ( British Association) are slotted.
Paul Doggett.   England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 


On 10 Dec 2019, at 21:43, Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:

I knew there are "Prototype Police," had no idea there was a "Slotted Screw" police force. I better be careful about "screwing up."

Bill Welch

Re: WP conversion

Fred Jansz
 

Randy,

you can purchase the drawings at the Pullman Library, Illionois Railway Museum.
The original drawings state: 3/32" roof plates and rivets, see drawing.
The wooden construction must have been applied afterwards because WP MW2711 was converted from a caboose (that was converted from a 15001-series boxcar early 1940's).
Cabooses did NOT have steel roofs anymore, they were rebuilt with wooden roofs, covered with muleskin.
(© Picture: John Ryczkowski)

regards
Fred Jansz

Re: WP conversion

Fred Jansz
 
Edited

Dear Garth,
the store cars were still on the system in the 1950's, see picture: SAC 7-56.
They were numbered 8051-8085 from the start and went into MW/scrapped.

Why are boxcars assigned to plaster service not assigned to general service?
Not all of them loaded plaster, only 35 of the 125 cars numbered into 26001-26125 had either 2 or 4 roof hatches, see enclosed copy of my 1950 ORER.
The rest was as built -only renumbered and with AB brakes- these cars stayed into service untill the end of WP in 1983.
See diagram & picture in my previous post and enclosed photo by Bob Larson taken in 1970.
cheers
Fred Jansz

Re: WP conversion

Randy Hees
 

We have one of these box cars in our museum shop,  WP 2711, wreck train rider car (Elko) , earlier numbers unknown, To Heber UT, converted to a tourist rider car, to Nevada State Railroad Museum Boulder City, 1993, out of service, currently being rehabilitated for tourist service…

 

In the case of this car the roof system consists of steel carlines with wood ridge pole and perlins on top of the steel carlines (and blocking directly over the carline, with wood roof sheeting running the length of the car body, with longitudinal boards over that.  There was a layer of roof felt or similar between the two layers of wood sheeting, and graveled roof felt over all.  It is possible (even likely) that the last layer of graveled roof paper was added after the car left the WP, or at worst while in work service, but the remainder of the roof is clearly from railroad service.  There is no evidence of any steel sheeting on this car.

 

By the way we would love to add any original plans to this car’s preservation file.

 

Randy Hees

Director, Nevada State Railroad Museum, Boulder City

rhees@...

 

Re: Building GN and CB&Q Truss Rod 40-Foot Boxcars

Bill Welch
 

I knew there are "Prototype Police," had no idea there was a "Slotted Screw" police force. I better be careful about "screwing up."

Bill Welch

Re: Stencil: Heavy Repairs

David Smith
 

Pretty sure those "brackets" are hinges for ice loading doors. 

Best,
Dave Smith

Re: Load of Nash crates bound for Copenhagen in C&NW gon 75951 ca. 1926

gary laakso
 

Brian:  Wonderful pictures, thank you very much for sharing them.

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Rochon
Sent: Tuesday, December 10, 2019 5:02 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Load of Nash crates bound for Copenhagen in C&NW gon 75951 ca. 1926

 

From the Steamtown site today.

 

http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-12-10-19/X4586.jpg

 

along with SFRD reefer 6719

 

http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-12-10-19/X4544.jpg

 

Brian Rochon

Re: Building GN and CB&Q Truss Rod 40-Foot Boxcars

Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi Bill,
 
Nothing really, but I have a very strong preference for Philips head screws, primarily because the screw driver can’t easily slide out of the slot as with slotted screws.  The down side of Philips screws is that both the screw head and the screw driver are more easily damage than slotted screw heads ad screw drivers, but that’s not a significant problem for me, especially with the small screws we typically use in our modeling.
 
Pax,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 

From: Bill Welch
Sent: Tuesday, December 10, 2019 6:37 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Building GN and CB&Q Truss Rod 40-Foot Boxcars
 
What is wrong with slotted screws, I have 400 of them?! Well truthfully I have probably used 100 from that 400 screw order.

Bill Welch

Re: Building GN and CB&Q Truss Rod 40-Foot Boxcars

Nelson Moyer
 

Nothing ‘wrong’ with slotted screws, but RTR cars have mostly Philips. I started with slotted because I couldn’t source 2-56 Philips in the lengths I needed locally, but as I got serious about resin building, I ordered 500 each of four Philips 2-56 lengths. I swap out the slotted screws when cars need maintenance so I don’t have to hunt for the right screwdriver, a Philips #0 does it all. I find Philips easier to use than slotted. I standardized on Pan 2-56 Philips for both trucks and couplers as a matter of convenience.

Nelson Moyer

On Dec 10, 2019, at 4:34 AM, Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

What is wrong with slotted screws, I have 400 of them?! Well truthfully I have probably used 100 from that 400 screw order. And then there are the 400+ models already built. Have I messed up using slotted screws? Will my models fall apart?

Bill Welch

Load of Nash crates bound for Copenhagen in C&NW gon 75951 ca. 1926

Brian Rochon
 

Re: Another "What do I do with this" quiz

Kemal Mumcu
 

So I was wrong! Clark, for the CN cars you seek the article you want to read is Railmodel Journal October 2000. Available on TrainLife I believe.

Colin Meikle

Re: WP conversion

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Fred and friends,

What I said, or intended to say, was that WP 8051-8055 were the last of the ex-15001 cars in general service, and that they were gone before 1949. The renumbered 26001-series was assigned to Gerlich plaster service and in theory weren't used for general loading anymore (many, if not all, had interior bulkheads, and some had loading hatches).

Further research in my collection throws a light on series 8051-8055's fate. While the 1947 general arrangement shows the 8051-series still listed as general freight cars, another version of the same general arrangement drawing with the numbers scratched out shows 8051-8085 in "store matl. service". This drawing is reproduced on page 163 of "MAINTENANCE OF WAY EQUIPMENT, WESTERN PACIFIC RAILROAD CO.", the official collection of WP MW car drawings reprinted by the Portola Railroad Museum some 30 years ago. The MW number group is from the book's original table of contents, and is not actually reflected on page 163 itself. The WP could be pretty sloppy about such things, as it really didn't matter much except to the bean counters at headquarters in San Francisco.

A few additional points on the numbers. The span of 8051-8055 comes from Frank Brehm's WP diagram web site, and is based on the caption he presented (sorry but his collection of diagrams is not currently available online). Upon careful examination of the diagram (which I downloaded), I see that the actual number span was 8051-8085. The numbers on the original were overwritten, and are a bit fuzzy, but this became apparent when I knew what to look for. So this tallies with numbers on the MW diagram cited above. According to that diagram, a total of 163 cars from the original 15001-series were converted to MW service (many becoming dormitory, kitchen or shop car conversions). WP MW8051-8085 (to use the correct spacing of WP's maintenance car numbering) apparently remained pretty much in original condition as boxcars.

I did make one mistake in my post, but an honest one based on an error in the drawings. The 12' 10" maximum body height was not at the roof peak, though that is how it is shown on the 1947 re-drawing, and on the MW drawing cited above. That value was actually over the running board, as shown on earlier drawings. I discovered the discrepancy while doing further research after my post.

Yours Aye,

Garth Groff  🦆


On Tue, Dec 10, 2019 at 4:03 AM Fred Jansz <fred@...> wrote:
Garth,
You discussed those cars with me (among others).
John's pictures and info is stacked away at the moment, so out of reach.
I also supplied you with copies of the Pullman drawings.

The last original -but renumbered- Pullman cars remaining on the WP roster were the 26001-26125 plaster cars and they stayed -in MW- until the end of WP in 1983.
These were the last remaining cars on the roster, not the 8051-series tool cars.
See the enclosed 1964 diagram.

cheers
Fred Jansz

Attachments:

Re: Building GN and CB&Q Truss Rod 40-Foot Boxcars

Bill Welch
 
Edited

What is wrong with slotted screws, I have 400 of them?! Well truthfully I have probably used 100 from that 400 screw order. And then there are the 400+ models already built. Have I messed up using slotted screws? Will my models fall apart?

Bill Welch

Re: WP conversion

Fred Jansz
 
Edited

Garth,
You discussed those cars with me (among others).
John's pictures and info is stashed away at the moment, so out of reach.
I also supplied you with copies of the Pullman drawings.

The last original -but renumbered- Pullman cars remaining on the WP roster were the 26001-26125 plaster cars and they stayed -in MW- until the end of WP in 1983.
These were the last remaining cars on the roster, not the 8051-series tool cars.
See the enclosed 1964 diagram.

cheers
Fred Jansz

Re: WP conversion

mel perry
 

hi:
how were the seams or joints sealed?
thanks
mrl perry

On Tue, Dec 10, 2019, 12:31 AM Fred Jansz <fred@...> wrote:
Guys,

I have copies of the Pullman drawings, pictures of the cars in question and I can assure you the roof of these cars consisted of overlapping steel sheets through their lifes from 1916-1983.
Like I wrote before:
- 10 sheets of 3' 5"
- 2 (end) sheets of 3'-3 7/16"
There were NO outside battens, but inside ribs.
Also the caboose roof did not have battens.
The MM drawings are not 100% correct: especially the roof, which has one weird smaller panel  somewhere halfway the roof. See drawing:

And the accurail car is a bad stand-in: roof is wrong, underbody is wrong, it's too tall and ....sigh.

Fred Jansz