Date   
Re: Yosemite Valley Railroad steam crane 08...

Paul Doggett
 

Beautiful work as always 

Paul Doggett.  England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 


On 30 Jan 2020, at 03:51, Thomas Evans via Groups.Io <tomkevans@...> wrote:

Beautiful work, Jack
Thanks for the photos
Tom

Re: Yosemite Valley Railroad steam crane 08...

Thomas Evans
 

Beautiful work, Jack
Thanks for the photos
Tom

Yosemite Valley Railroad steam crane 08...

Jack Burgess
 

As I recall, we decided some time ago that maintenance of way equipment could be shared on this chat list.

 

A number of years ago I began collecting information on this crane and drew detailed plans for it a couple of years ago. I finally started building the model about 6 months ago and finished it today. Attached are three photos of the final model. The frame and basic body were fabricated from .015” sheet brass while the roof, boom, interior details, and a half-dozen other parts were 3D printed. The project was frustrating at times but was a very challenging and enjoyable project.

 

Jack Burgess

 

Re: Stakes For Lumber Loads: Hardwood Vs. Softwood

Todd Sullivan
 

Hi Bob,

Since hardwood has usually been more valuable/expensive than softwoods, I would assume that hardwood stakes (of oak, for example) wouldn't be used unless there was a need for high strength stakes.  Most lumber mills use whatever is readily available, which is usually what they are sawing.  I've seen saplings used, but mostly in modern times.  It costs money to to cut and plane wood for a stake, so 'why bother?' seems to be the mantra of modern cost accountants.  My recollection is that all of the stakes I saw while in the PacNW 1957-1962 were rough sawn softwoods.

Todd Sullivan
in Rowlett, TX

Re: Requesting instructions for Wright Trak Seaboard V10

Bill Welch
 

On Tue, Jan 28, 2020 at 11:50 AM, Eric Hansmann wrote:

 

The 1943 SAL ventilated boxcar fleet was the third largest. Central of Georgia (3,647) and Atlantic Coast Line (3,244) were the top two. The total of all CoG, ACL, and SAL ventilated cars was 72% of the 13,810 US railroad ventilated boxcars in the 1943 ORER.

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

Add to this total around 2,000 36-foot ventilated boxcars owned by the Louisville & Nashville during this period. These were built in 1923—one thousand each by Mt. Vernon and Tenn. Coal, Iron & Railroad.

Bill Welch

Re: Book of historical drawings; is it worth scanning?

Dennis Storzek
 

On Wed, Jan 29, 2020 at 11:37 AM, Charlie Vlk wrote:

f the volume in question is this one…

Drawings of the standards and recommended practice of the Master Car Builders Association  Henry O. Shepard Co. Press Chicago 1918

It is already available online at HathiTrust.  Here is a link:

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uiuc.2544177_001

Nice find, Charlie. No, the book in my possession is from eight years later, June, 1926, and is limited to trucks and the Recommended Practice car designs the ARA had adopted; the single sheathed boxcar with the pressed steel Pratt truss framing, and a similar double sheathed car with a steel framed superstructure. It appears to be a complete set of drawings because they go down to the level of detailing each sill step, bracket, bolt, etc. Unfortunately, the drawings show the generic flat plate ends and flat sheet riveted roof, which are features apparently no road bought; each opting for proprietary designs that were permissible alternates.

While the Hathi Trust scans are welcome for printed text with occasional diagrams, looking at these MCB drawings, the resolution leaves something to be desired, considering the drawings are already greatly reduced for publication in the book.

Dennis Storzek

Re: Stakes For Lumber Loads: Hardwood Vs. Softwood

Bob Chaparro
 

True, but I'm looking for industry practice rather than just what is allowed.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA

Grandt Line part

Pierre Oliver
 

Anybody out there have a spare set of Grandt Line #5167 reefer door latch hardware, they be willing to part with?

--
Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com

composite gon and twin hopper images

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
A nice view of a Philadelphia & Reading composite gondola...
 
 
Also, if you download the TIF version of the image linked below, you get a nice view of NRBX 1533, a twin hopper built to PRR GLa design specifications...
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund

Re: Book of historical drawings; is it worth scanning?

Dave Nelson
 

Do you have drawings for any of the castings Camel provided for boxcar doors?  These are, AFAIK, very hard to find.

 

A collection of sill step drawings (w/ reference to which car series used them) could be of interest.

Dave Nelson

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jeff Eggert

Relating this to steam era freight cars, I have a homemade stand and have used it to digitize over 4,000 car forging drawings the CNWHS has.  We have deemed these drawings to be of minimal value (as far as we know no one has ever asked for them, ever

Re: Book of historical drawings; is it worth scanning?

Charlie Vlk
 

All

If the volume in question is this one…

Drawings of the standards and recommended practice of the Master Car Builders Association  Henry O. Shepard Co. Press Chicago 1918

It is already available online at HathiTrust.  Here is a link:

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uiuc.2544177_001

This one has the MCM-26B samples of the Standard Letters and Figures for Freight Car Marking…. Showing the M, C, B, 2, 7, 8 in 9”, 7”, 4” , 3”, 2” and 1” sizes.

 

If it is different it is certainly worth scanning.

Charlie Vlk

 

 

Re: Stakes For Lumber Loads: Hardwood Vs. Softwood

Dennis Storzek
 

On Wed, Jan 29, 2020 at 11:00 AM, Bob Chaparro wrote:
The AAR's "Rules Governing the Loading of Forest Products On Open Top Cars" specifies "Stakes, hardwood, southern pine, long leaf pine, fir, spruce, larch or hemlock...or green saplings..."
I think you just answered your own question, since every species on that list other than "hardwood" is considered a softwood.

Dennis Storzek

Stakes For Lumber Loads: Hardwood Vs. Softwood

Bob Chaparro
 

Stakes For Lumber Loads: Hardwood Vs. Softwood

In the Owl Mountain Models video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7LngArG22gU ) on assembling their lumber load kit the narrator states (at 12:30 into the video) that vertical stakes used to restrain the load were hardwood.

It seems to me that the vertical stakes more likely would be the same wood as the load and stakes would originate from the same forest area near the mill.

I've looked at a number of prototype lumber loads and sometimes the stakes appear to match the load and sometimes they don't.

And, of course, sometimes the stakes are made from tree saplings.

The AAR's "Rules Governing the Loading of Forest Products On Open Top Cars" specifies "Stakes, hardwood, southern pine, long leaf pine, fir, spruce, larch or hemlock...or green saplings..."

Does anyone have more insight into this? Were softwood shipments usually restrained with hardwood vertical stakes?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Re: Book of historical drawings; is it worth scanning?

Nolan Hinshaw
 

On Jan 28, 2020, at 21:03, Jeff Eggert <ophoto@...> wrote:

I'll second the use of a DSLR for digitizing a book such as this. A simple copy stand and a 20+ MP DSLR can generally do well for most items up to 11x17 in size or so, depends on how fine the printing is.
For E-size material a medium format camera might be preferable, just in case anyone's planning to digitize material that large. OhByTheWay, something better than Acrobat Pro should be the tool to convert the raster file to vectors for technical drawings.

FUNEM
SVFM
FUNEX
SVFX
OKMNX

Re: Requesting instructions for Wright Trak Seaboard V10

Robert kirkham
 

It can be said for the west coast of Canada.  Somewhere in my stuff I have photo proof . . .

 

Rob

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Donald B. Valentine via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, January 27, 2020 6:44 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Requesting instructions for Wright Trak Seaboard V10

 

Lark Cooper wrote: While I’m not a y'all road modeler, one of these neat cars could occasionally make an appearance.

 

   That could be said even if you were modeling some of the roads in Eastern Canada.

 

Cordialy, Don Valentine

Re: Book of historical drawings; is it worth scanning?

Jeff Eggert
 

I'll second the use of a DSLR for digitizing a book such as this.  A simple copy stand and a 20+ MP DSLR can generally do well for most items up to 11x17 in size or so, depends on how fine the printing is.

Relating this to steam era freight cars, I have a homemade stand and have used it to digitize over 4,000 car forging drawings the CNWHS has.  We have deemed these drawings to be of minimal value (as far as we know no one has ever asked for them, ever) and felt traditional flatbed scanning was too time consuming or feeder scanning wouldn't work.  They were taking up prime file cabinet space before, now they can be relegated to deeper depths of the archives storage.  A small resolution sample is attached.

Jeff Eggert

Re: Another new (?) vendor at Springfield

Bill Welch
 
Edited

Very fine and realistic items. He has been at CCB Prototype Rails in 2018 and 2019. Glad to see he is expanding his offerings and making the rounds at various shows and meets.

Bill Welch

Re: Book of historical drawings; is it worth scannin

Randy Hees
 

Beyond modeling they have value.  I care for museum equipment.  We are FRA regulated.  Among those regulations is the 50 year freight car rule...  That says cars are done at 50 years with some allowance for rebuilding or alternately a waiver.... My waiver includes a required 2 year "comprehensive inspection"...  Which last go round was observed by the FRA...   In general you inspect the cars to AAR interchange rules.

The current AAR interchange rule book (which the FRA guy carried) does not include anything lighter than 70 ton capacity cars...  We had to use an older rule books (1975, and update to 1974) from the museum collection to establish the standards to inspect to including side bearing clearance and center plate clearance.  We had a question on acceptable cast side frames which these drawings might address.  

I have also used earlier MCB standards and United States Safety Appliances books when writing preservation studies to guide restorations.

Randy Hees
Director, Nevada State Railroad Museum, Boulder City

Re: Book of historical drawings; is it worth scanning?

mel perry
 

of course, it has historical value and should be
preserved and scanned, there appears to be no
shortage of volunteers for the project, i would
just add, that who/whomever is chosen, doesn't
ise this item ad a means of extortion, ideally it should be posted to the web with "copy" super
imposed on each page, that way it can be viewed
by everyone, and if someone chooses to
purchase copy or copies, at a reasonable price
they can.do so, storing it someplace which is
not acceptable, unless they have to travel a
distance, is a form of elitism, give the public
a chance, at least to view the documents with
other options, notice i said "reasonable prices",
i already know where this is headed
mel perry

Re: ADMIN RE: [RealSTMFC] New eBay listing

Dave Nelson
 

What is missing from the long established rules is the situation where a list member sees something for sale from some unknown third party and believes the item may be of general interest to other members.  For many years I would forward inventory announcements from used booksellers for CBC’s and CBD’s.  In every case I did not know anything about the seller much less have a financial interest.  No one ever complained.

 

IMO the rules should allow the above situation and if so it should be documented in the rules.

 

Dave Nelson

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Aley, Jeff A
Sent: Monday, January 27, 2020 6:22 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io; main+owner@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: ADMIN RE: [RealSTMFC] New eBay listing

 

Hi Folks,

 

The relevant rules are below.  Permit me to summarize:

1.  We permit the announcement of freight car-related items for sale.  These announcements should be kept to a minimum, and inquiries directed off-list.

2. COMPANIES who wish to announce freight car-related items for sale shall post their announcements between noon Friday EST and Saturday 11:59PM EST.

 

In my judgement, Clark Propst’s email meets the spirit and the letter of the rules.

 

Regards,

 

-Jeff Aley,

Deputy Moderator, STMFC

 

“Announcements of frt car related items for sale are permitted BUT actual

lists of items should be made available from the seller upon request rather

than in the message. Announcements of such sales should be kept at a

minimum. The primary objective of the group is to exchange information

concerning the subject.

 

Messages regarding the selling of products as part of a commercial

enterprise must be sent during the period of noon Friday EST and Saturday

midnight EST.

 

Each seller is allowed one message unless a correction is needed. Seller

messages MUST include OFF GROUP addresses for replies. Replies by members to

seller messages MUST be OFF GROUP.”

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Roger Huber via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, January 27, 2020 3:50 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] New eBay listing

 

I read the group description and goals and see no mention of selling, etc. I would prefer this group NOT become flea market but still welcome someone selling kits or completed cars, parts or being made aware of new products. Some folks don't have a lot of contacts in which to be informed about things so we should be able to share here.

 

I would appreciate having a moderator get in this conversation with a YEA or NAY for us.

 

Thanks,

 

Roger Huber

Deer Creek Locomotive Works