Topics

Train Shed Cyclopedias

byronrose@...
 

On Sat, 13 Jan 2001 11:05:38 -0800 "Dave & Libby Nelson"
<muskoka@...> writes:
Dave Nelson
-still offended by Intermountains 20-25% surcharge for what could of
and
should of been done right the first time.
Or at least the second time or at the very worst the third. I just heard
that it took recutting the roof five, count 'em, five times to get it
right. At least they did get it right on that fifth try. I'm still not
sure about the ends or the lettering.

Before you start ringing my email off the hook, I'll tell you:

The overlap joint on the face of the ends looks like someone in hip
boots. Instead of a looong taper, they hid the return in the edges of
the next above rib. And I think the ribs start too close to the top of
the ends: not enough room to get the lettering in comfortably. But on
three of the four kits I got the end lettering was all over the place.
Only one kit was worth building. I'll soon find out how well they stand
behind their guarantee.

Also, don't even try to install the grossly oversize retainer valve line
(.006" scale vs .018" model), 'taint worth the effort and disappears
anyway. Also be careful of gluing the floor to the car body, the locater
pin may set it unaligned with the car sub-ends. And that's as far as
I've gotten.

Don't thank me, it's all in a days work.

BSR
________________________________________________________________
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Dave & Libby Nelson <muskoka@...>
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Richard Hendrickson [mailto:rhendrickson@...]
Dave Nelson wrote (about Branchline's "big goof):

They used a drawing from Mainline Modeler than was incorrect so their 40'
car became 41'+ long. It's been withdrawn from the market and perhaps
someday will be retooled.
I understand it already has been retooled. BL's big problem is not enough
molding machine output, so they've got a backlog of tooling for
models they can't get into production.

Whoa - great news! They deserve a lot of credit for fixing it so soon. I
suppose the next question is whether they'll pay for their own mistake or,
like Intermountain, fob it off on the consumer.

Dave Nelson
-still offended by Intermountains 20-25% surcharge for what could of and
should of been done right the first time.

Richard Hendrickson
 

Dave Nelson wrote (about Branchline's "big goof):

They used a drawing from Mainline Modeler than was incorrect so their 40'
car became 41'+ long. It's been withdrawn from the market and perhaps
someday will be retooled.
I understand it already has been retooled. BL's big problem is not enough
molding machine output, so they've got a backlog of tooling for models they
can't get into production.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520

Dave & Libby Nelson <muskoka@...>
 

Branchline (save their big goof), also, and a tip og the hat for dating
their box.

Dave & Others,
Enlighten me on this, what WAS their big goof?

They used a drawing from Mainline Modeler than was incorrect so their 40'
car became 41'+ long. It's been withdrawn from the market and perhaps
someday will be retooled.

Dave Nelson

ibs4421@...
 

And maybe if the owner isn't too willing to have the
internet available to the customers, someday you pull out your wireless
palm
whatever and call up the information. - John
We may smirk when John says this, but you know what? It will be a reality
in the not so distant future. Just keep thinking those positive waves, or,
as Oddball would say, "It's a Mother-Beautiful bridge! and it's gonna be
there!"

Warren Dickinson

ibs4421@...
 

Branchline (save their big goof), also, and a tip og the hat for dating
their box.

Dave & Others,
Enlighten me on this, what WAS their big goof? I
know after getting burned badly on purchasing their L&N Hummingbird, they
will have to PROVE to me that the accuracy and quality are there. I've seen
Dodge Darts come out of an Earl Shibe paint shop with better paint and
application than what i got from them. Their "authorized dealer" still owes
me money, after the phone calls started to climb, I had to quit pursuing it.

Warren Dickinson

Dave & Libby Nelson <muskoka@...>
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Jeff Aley - GCD PE [mailto:jaley@...]
Comments: It seems to me that there are two questions that the beginning
prototype modeler might ask himself (or herself).

1) What should I model?
2) How do I model it?
It behooves one to
know what kits and scratchbuilding supplies are available and applicable.
Know? Aye and therein lies the rub: Most every manufacturer will lie. Yes,
the economics are (sympathetically) well known, but the word IMO, by and
large, is 'lie'. My advice for the newbie is this: regard every paint job
with the same degree of trust as one would have for your average 3 card
monte professional. Focus on the structure, not the paint job. With the
resin mfr's you've an extremely high degree of confidence it is what the box
says it is. P2K gets high marks, but not perfect. Branchline (save their
big goof), also, and a tip og the hat for dating their box. Everybody else,
to one degree or another, has a lie to sell -- some truths too, but how
would the ignorant consumer know? So knowledge will often be purchased in
unexpected and not always happy ways. And having reached this point then
go look much more carefully at the books you've bought.

Dave Nelson

ibs4421@...
 

So right Tony. Somebody's going to have to pony up the bucks. I'm sure you
know this as well as anybody. It did seem to me, however, in looking at
issues of RMC and MR that there seems to be a lot more money changing hands,
and available out there in model rr'ing land than there is in scale plastic
model land. Obviously somebody is spending the big bucks on some of the
many, many books being published out there. There's a whole new crop of
books it seems every month. Well, it was just a thought. I'm a danger to
myself and others at times when I get to thinking. I sure didn't mean for
the thread to take off into parts unknown.

Warren Dickinson

I'm watching this thread alertly to see intereste level and if there are
any authors out there. Hardly any books materialize just cuz someone wants
'em.

Jeff Aley - GCD PE <jaley@...>
 

Okay, I'll stand corrected. So the implication here is that this is *NOT*
an intractable problem, and it should be possible to create such a beast.

Perhaps we should start a clamor for these booklets?

On Jan 11, 3:41pm, Richard Hendrickson wrote:
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Train Shed Cyclopedias
I don't know anything about military modeling or equipment, so let me
know
if my assumptions are off-base.

Isn't the magnitude of the problem much different between military
equipment (armor, aircraft, ships) and freight cars. I mean, for a
given
piece of armor, how many paint schemes were there? Three or four? Now
take, for example, a PS-1. Now we're talking about a LOT of paint
schemes. And what, 12 (or more?) different variations.
Hello? Earth to Jeff. I'm no expert on armor, but I do know a good bit
about aircraft, and I can assure you that there were endless variations
on
equipment,paint, insignia, etc. even on relatively low production
aircraft,
not to mention planes that were built by the thousands like the P-51,
B-25,
B-17, etc. Documenting the variations on PS-1s would be child's play
compared to doing the same for, say, Curtiss P-40s, which had
twenty-some
major production variants, were used by many allied air forces, and
appeared in so many paint schemes that it's a monumental task to
document
even the ones for which photographic and other evidence survives.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520



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-- End of excerpt from Richard Hendrickson


--
Jeff Aley, Development Engineer jaley@...
Graphics Components Division
Intel Corporation, Folsom, CA
(916) 356-3533

thompson@...
 

Surely you could sell enough of those amongst us purists
to make a profit from it?
I'm watching this thread alertly to see intereste level and if there are
any authors out there. Hardly any books materialize just cuz someone wants
'em.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 http://www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroads and on Western history

Richard Hendrickson
 

I don't know anything about military modeling or equipment, so let me know
if my assumptions are off-base.

Isn't the magnitude of the problem much different between military
equipment (armor, aircraft, ships) and freight cars. I mean, for a given
piece of armor, how many paint schemes were there? Three or four? Now
take, for example, a PS-1. Now we're talking about a LOT of paint
schemes. And what, 12 (or more?) different variations.
Hello? Earth to Jeff. I'm no expert on armor, but I do know a good bit
about aircraft, and I can assure you that there were endless variations on
equipment,paint, insignia, etc. even on relatively low production aircraft,
not to mention planes that were built by the thousands like the P-51, B-25,
B-17, etc. Documenting the variations on PS-1s would be child's play
compared to doing the same for, say, Curtiss P-40s, which had twenty-some
major production variants, were used by many allied air forces, and
appeared in so many paint schemes that it's a monumental task to document
even the ones for which photographic and other evidence survives.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520

John Nehrich <nehrij@...>
 

Also I'm not sure the other hobbies have something akin to an ORER to let
one track car series. (Okay, maybe something like Jane's Fighting Ships or
what - not my hobby, so I'm not sure - but certainly I would not think for
armour.) - John

----- Original Message -----
From: "Jeff Aley - GCD PE" <jaley@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Thursday, January 11, 2001 4:14 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Train Shed Cyclopedias


I don't know anything about military modeling or equipment, so let me know
if my assumptions are off-base.

Isn't the magnitude of the problem much different between military
equipment (armor, aircraft, ships) and freight cars. I mean, for a given
piece of armor, how many paint schemes were there? Three or four? Now
take, for example, a PS-1. Now we're talking about a LOT of paint
schemes. And what, 12 (or more?) different variations.

In addition, I'm guessing that there are a lot more different kinds of
freight cars to be covered. A lot of roads had cars built in their own
shops that aren't very similar to anyone else's car.

I would expect to see something about diesels long before we see such
books about freight cars, as the "diesel problem" is much more tractable.

Regards,

-Jeff



On Jan 11, 12:41pm, <ibs4421@...> wrote:
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Train Shed Cyclopedias
Question: What is the Squadron series like? I've never modeled
anything
but railroads, so I'm not familiar with the data contained therein.

Jeff,
First, the line is from "A Freightcar Named Desire".

The Squadron "In Action" series is arranged thusly: Horizontal
format
softcover books dedicated to one particular subject, usually about 50
pages
in length, and LOADED with B&W photos with good, concise captions
beneath
each one detailing time, location, etc. inaddition to anything of
particular
interest to the modeler. In addition there are ususally several scale
drawings in three views and also some detailing certain areas of the
a/c,
armor, or ship in question that provide good detail for the modeler, in
addition to detail differences between certain production models. The
center spread consists of several renderings of the subject in profile,
but
in color to show color variations, paint schemes, etc.
--
Jeff Aley, Development Engineer jaley@...
Graphics Components Division
Intel Corporation, Folsom, CA
(916) 356-3533

To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
STMFC-unsubscribe@...


Jeff Aley - GCD PE <jaley@...>
 

I don't know anything about military modeling or equipment, so let me know
if my assumptions are off-base.

Isn't the magnitude of the problem much different between military
equipment (armor, aircraft, ships) and freight cars. I mean, for a given
piece of armor, how many paint schemes were there? Three or four? Now
take, for example, a PS-1. Now we're talking about a LOT of paint
schemes. And what, 12 (or more?) different variations.

In addition, I'm guessing that there are a lot more different kinds of
freight cars to be covered. A lot of roads had cars built in their own
shops that aren't very similar to anyone else's car.

I would expect to see something about diesels long before we see such
books about freight cars, as the "diesel problem" is much more tractable.

Regards,

-Jeff



On Jan 11, 12:41pm, <ibs4421@...> wrote:
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Train Shed Cyclopedias
Question: What is the Squadron series like? I've never modeled
anything
but railroads, so I'm not familiar with the data contained therein.

Jeff,
First, the line is from "A Freightcar Named Desire".

The Squadron "In Action" series is arranged thusly: Horizontal
format
softcover books dedicated to one particular subject, usually about 50
pages
in length, and LOADED with B&W photos with good, concise captions
beneath
each one detailing time, location, etc. inaddition to anything of
particular
interest to the modeler. In addition there are ususally several scale
drawings in three views and also some detailing certain areas of the
a/c,
armor, or ship in question that provide good detail for the modeler, in
addition to detail differences between certain production models. The
center spread consists of several renderings of the subject in profile,
but
in color to show color variations, paint schemes, etc.
--
Jeff Aley, Development Engineer jaley@...
Graphics Components Division
Intel Corporation, Folsom, CA
(916) 356-3533

Shawn Beckert
 

Richard "Dawn Patrol" Hendrickson wrote:

...Like it or not, a whole lot more people are
interested in P-51s or even Westland Lysanders
(let's see how many people on this list recognize
that one!) than in PS-1's or R-40-23's.
Me, for one. Butt ugly airplane; for looks I'll take
the Hawker Sea Fury, since we're talking British
aircraft. Different function, of course.

Mandatory Freight Car Content (do we have that here?):
Remember the little booklets that Westside used to put
out on the prototype history of some of their brass
imports? What if someone were to take the same approach
to freight cars, say a small publication on Type 21 or
Type 27 tank cars, or the PS-1, since I mentioned it?

Surely you could sell enough of those amongst us purists
to make a profit from it?

Shawn Beckert

ibs4421@...
 

What a cool, but strange a/c the Westland Lysander is. Ya gotta respect
the guys who were willing to fly them on insertions missions though.

Warren Dickinson
Elkton, Kentucky 42220
At the end of the former Guthrie&Elkton Branch, L&N

----- Original Message -----
From: "Richard Hendrickson" <rhendrickson@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Thursday, January 11, 2001 1:51 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Train Shed Cyclopedias


Warren (who doubtless has a last name, though he hasn't told us what it is
yet) wrote, about hypothetical RR equivalents of Squadron publications:

....Since there seems to be an undercurrent these days for more
prototypical
modeling, I think that a "single source" volume of information such as
these
would provide would be a viable thing. Just think of what subjects you
could decently covere in 50 pages of photos and drawings? Aside from
certain freight car designs, you could do some on the USRA steam locos, and
the first generation diesels.
The problem, of course, is sheer numbers. Like it or not, a whole lot more
people are interested in P-51s or even Westland Lysanders (let's see how
many people on this list recognize that one!) than in PS-1s or R-40-23s.
Sizeable circulation enables Squadron to sell their books at moderate
prices, but even breaking even would require comparable RR books to sell
for a lot more, which would further limit the size of their market. So I
don't think such publications are viable...at least, not yet.

If I hit a big Powerball one day, some of ya'll will find new jobs
working for me to produce these things. <G!>
Just say the word and I'll send you my resum�. How do you make a small
fortune in the model RR publishing business? You start with a large
fortune.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520



To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
STMFC-unsubscribe@...

ibs4421@...
 

Col. Klink has now ordered Warren to "face The Wall" for ten hours.


We are going to get to you yet...the 1937 box cars were an AAR "Standard",
not ARA. 8^)

John Nehrich <nehrij@...>
 

Why kill a tree? I'm hoping that you go into a hobby store, look at the
available selections of a particular type of kit, then ask the owner to go
to our web site and hopefully you can find the most up to date information
about each version (vetted by the gurus on this list with both objective
information and subjective opinions) and this helps you make the choice
that's right for you. And maybe if the owner isn't too willing to have the
internet available to the customers, someday you pull out your wireless palm
whatever and call up the information. - John

----- Original Message -----
From: <ibs4421@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Thursday, January 11, 2001 1:41 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Train Shed Cyclopedias


Question: What is the Squadron series like? I've never modeled anything
but railroads, so I'm not familiar with the data contained therein.

Jeff,
First, the line is from "A Freightcar Named Desire".

The Squadron "In Action" series is arranged thusly: Horizontal
format
softcover books dedicated to one particular subject, usually about 50
pages
in length, and LOADED with B&W photos with good, concise captions beneath
each one detailing time, location, etc. inaddition to anything of
particular
interest to the modeler. In addition there are ususally several scale
drawings in three views and also some detailing certain areas of the a/c,
armor, or ship in question that provide good detail for the modeler, in
addition to detail differences between certain production models. The
center spread consists of several renderings of the subject in profile,
but
in color to show color variations, paint schemes, etc.
In my imagined "more perfect world" if these were available for steam
era freight cars, the following would happen, as this is what used to
happen
when I built scale models of other subjects:
I would arrive at my hobby shop of choice with money in hand to
purchase a model. OK, so today I'm in a tank car mood, so I stroll on
down
the aisle, and there are some undec. P2K 8,000 gal. tank cars. (Hey! I
said
it was my perfect world, OK?) I pick up a couple, and then wind my way
over to the magazine & book section. Ahh!, there they are, the new
Hendrickson/Nehrich "In Service" series of horizontal format books on
steam
era freight cars. I spin the carousel, and there's the one I want, "Type
21
Tank Cars In Service", and there's a cool painting on the front of a
Shippers Car Line 8K Tank Car sitting in a freight yard w/ a switcher
about
to couple on to it. There are two more paintings on the back with
captions
each showing a Type 21 Tank Car with different reproting marks or paint
schemes. thumbing through it I notice that it is chock full of B&W photos
of these cars doing what they do best, and covering most of the different
reporting marks and paint schemes throughout their service life. There
are
little tech. drawings all through it showing the different little
apputerenances like the plumbing, brakes systems, etc. that were applied
to
these cars over time. Yep, just what I need to model a prototypically
correct model in one volume. After purchasing these items, I hop in my
car
and head home listening to cool bluegrass music about railroads.
Since there seems to be an undercurrent these days for more
prototypical
modeling, I think that a "single source" volume of information such as
these
would provide would be a viable thing. Just think of what subjects you
could decently covere in 50 pages of photos and drawings? Aside from
certain freight car designs, you could do some on the USRA steam locos,
and
the first generation diesels.
If I hit a big Powerball one day, some of ya'll will find new jobs
working for me to produce these things. <G!>

Warren


To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
STMFC-unsubscribe@...


Richard Hendrickson
 

Warren (who doubtless has a last name, though he hasn't told us what it is
yet) wrote, about hypothetical RR equivalents of Squadron publications:

....Since there seems to be an undercurrent these days for more prototypical
modeling, I think that a "single source" volume of information such as these
would provide would be a viable thing. Just think of what subjects you
could decently covere in 50 pages of photos and drawings? Aside from
certain freight car designs, you could do some on the USRA steam locos, and
the first generation diesels.
The problem, of course, is sheer numbers. Like it or not, a whole lot more
people are interested in P-51s or even Westland Lysanders (let's see how
many people on this list recognize that one!) than in PS-1s or R-40-23s.
Sizeable circulation enables Squadron to sell their books at moderate
prices, but even breaking even would require comparable RR books to sell
for a lot more, which would further limit the size of their market. So I
don't think such publications are viable...at least, not yet.

If I hit a big Powerball one day, some of ya'll will find new jobs
working for me to produce these things. <G!>
Just say the word and I'll send you my resumé. How do you make a small
fortune in the model RR publishing business? You start with a large
fortune.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520

ibs4421@...
 

"P-51 Walk Around" and "F-15 Walk Around" showing nothing but
detail photos of these birds. Imagine if we had a "PS-1 Walk
Around" or an "R-40-23 Walk Around" to browse through!

Yes! the "Walk Around" series is really nice. Very, very detail oriented.
LOL, my son has been into them since he could talk. Made his Mom read him
"P-40 In Action for a bedtime story one night. He's into railroads now too.
He would make us read "1937 ARA Boxcars In Service" if there was such a
thing.
Seriously though, I really think someone shoud consider doing this for
railroad modelers. At one time the a/c and armor guys just built what ever
came along without questioning the accuracy like a lot of RR modelers still
do. When Squadron started putting these things out in the early 70's, scale
plastic modeling began to change, and so did the manufacturers efforts.
Starting in the 80's you started seeing much more accurate models coming
out. Of course the big difference is scale modelers ALL want to build
something, it's the whole reason for their existence. With us, building a
prototypically correct freight car is more often thatn not a means to
another end. A lot of folks in the model RR community want stuff as ready
to run as possible. Except fo course, for us!

Warren

ibs4421@...
 

Question: What is the Squadron series like? I've never modeled anything
but railroads, so I'm not familiar with the data contained therein.

Jeff,
First, the line is from "A Freightcar Named Desire".

The Squadron "In Action" series is arranged thusly: Horizontal format
softcover books dedicated to one particular subject, usually about 50 pages
in length, and LOADED with B&W photos with good, concise captions beneath
each one detailing time, location, etc. inaddition to anything of particular
interest to the modeler. In addition there are ususally several scale
drawings in three views and also some detailing certain areas of the a/c,
armor, or ship in question that provide good detail for the modeler, in
addition to detail differences between certain production models. The
center spread consists of several renderings of the subject in profile, but
in color to show color variations, paint schemes, etc.
In my imagined "more perfect world" if these were available for steam
era freight cars, the following would happen, as this is what used to happen
when I built scale models of other subjects:
I would arrive at my hobby shop of choice with money in hand to
purchase a model. OK, so today I'm in a tank car mood, so I stroll on down
the aisle, and there are some undec. P2K 8,000 gal. tank cars. (Hey! I said
it was my perfect world, OK?) I pick up a couple, and then wind my way
over to the magazine & book section. Ahh!, there they are, the new
Hendrickson/Nehrich "In Service" series of horizontal format books on steam
era freight cars. I spin the carousel, and there's the one I want, "Type 21
Tank Cars In Service", and there's a cool painting on the front of a
Shippers Car Line 8K Tank Car sitting in a freight yard w/ a switcher about
to couple on to it. There are two more paintings on the back with captions
each showing a Type 21 Tank Car with different reproting marks or paint
schemes. thumbing through it I notice that it is chock full of B&W photos
of these cars doing what they do best, and covering most of the different
reporting marks and paint schemes throughout their service life. There are
little tech. drawings all through it showing the different little
apputerenances like the plumbing, brakes systems, etc. that were applied to
these cars over time. Yep, just what I need to model a prototypically
correct model in one volume. After purchasing these items, I hop in my car
and head home listening to cool bluegrass music about railroads.
Since there seems to be an undercurrent these days for more prototypical
modeling, I think that a "single source" volume of information such as these
would provide would be a viable thing. Just think of what subjects you
could decently covere in 50 pages of photos and drawings? Aside from
certain freight car designs, you could do some on the USRA steam locos, and
the first generation diesels.
If I hit a big Powerball one day, some of ya'll will find new jobs
working for me to produce these things. <G!>

Warren