Steel Billets


Tim O'Connor <timoconnor@...>
 

Dave Nelson wrote

Per my J&L catalog, a 5" square of steel weighs 85 lbs/running foot. You
should be able to calculate a carload from that.
That would be 29 pieces, 40 feet long, for a 98,600 pound steam era load.

Were there standard lengths for billets, as for rail. Or were they sized
to order? (Obviously this would be before continuous casting mills.)

Timothy O'Connor <timoconnor@mediaone.net>
Marlborough, Massachusetts


dixierails <dixierails@...>
 

Clark,
The gondola in the NMRA Bulletin photo I referenced contained 4 stacks in
what looks to be a 52' gondola. Two stacks of bars are side by side ( 4
tiers high x nine 5x5 bars in one stack and 4 tiers high X seven 5x5 bars).
Each of the two stacks are at the end of the gon over a set of trucks. Wood
bracing is used to keep the stacks seperated and wood 4x4s keep the bars
away from the side of the gon. The bars appear to be approximately 20'
long.

Talk about a picture being worth a 1000 words. If I had a scanner, I'd show
you the photo in question. Good luck building a load. Let me know how it
turns out.
Larry Sexton

----- Original Message -----
From: "Clark Propst" <cepropst@rconnect.com>
To: "STMFC" <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Tuesday, March 27, 2001 5:05 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Steel Billets



Dave & Libby Nelson <muskoka@...>
 

The only question remaining is, how full were the cars?
Clark
Per my J&L catalog, a 5" square of steel weighs 85 lbs/running foot. You
should be able to calculate a carload from that.

Dave Nelson


Clark Propst <cepropst@...>
 

Thanks Dave, Larry and Guy,
The only question remaining is, how full were the cars?
Clark