Loose ends


Clark Propst <cepropst@...>
 

The local modelers/railfans here get together every month or so. Last
night I said to Soph Marty, "You're having fun with your new scanner
aren't you." His answer was an enthusiastic yes! He went on to say "That
guy out in Oregon is even writing back to tell me all about the freight
cars! He seems to be all excited over them?" Soph's into O scale narrow
gauge, so he has trouble understanding.

I asked a conductor friend about a couple of questions that were
brought up on this group.
1) Back in plain bearing days did you repair hot boxes on site? Answer,
We didn't carry the equipment. We had some special lube sticks ( I
forgot the name). After the fire was out we would put several of these (
I forgot the number) in the journal and then drop the car off at the
nearest siding.
Part A) If you were to change the brass on site how big of jacks would
you need? Answer, Not that big, you only were lifting the weight off of
one end of one axle and only enough to slip the old brass out and slide
the new brass in.

2) Where did all the meat reefers actually end up, who were the real
customers? This fella started on the Milw, so he's been involved with
all the major meat packers in the upper midwest. I'll make his very long
and interesting story short. Answer, East. The meat was funneled into
Chicago to the EJ&E, IHB or BRC. These roads would transfer blocks
across town on schedules in a guaranteed time, big recipient was the
NKP. So, Different railroads would gathers meat from different packing
houses (all cars same company). Then block them for the transferring RR
(cars mixed up). These RR's would reblock them again with other RR's
cars before handing them off. Final destination? Large cold storage
facilities east? I'm not done with this question yet!

Freight car colors, I always thought it was strange that there were
never any color discussions on this group, now I now why! I'll will let
a picture talk for me, look at the color of the three cars in the SD
Marty shot of ACY 2126 John posted.

Thanks for your time,
Clark


Richard Hendrickson
 

I asked a conductor friend about a couple of questions that were
brought up on this group.
1) Back in plain bearing days did you repair hot boxes on site? Answer,
We didn't carry the equipment....
True, no doubt, on many RRs. But out west, where freight trains ran
hundreds of miles in a day and it was often a long way between sidings,
spare brasses and suitable jacks were routinely carried in caboose tool
boxes. On the Santa Fe (and, I'm pretty sure, the UP and SP as well), the
equipment necessary to replace brasses was part of the inventory on every
caboose, and conductors were responsible for making sure it was there
before every trip.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


lawrence jackman <ljack70117@...>
 

I know the UPRR and AT&SF did carry the things needed to
repair hot boxes. The only thing they could not do is change
the wheel set if the journal was cut. In the case of a cut
journal they would set it out or nurse it in. A hot train
would set it out and a local would pick it up and nurse it
in. The SF local from Enterprise Ks picked up a caboose,
whoop, excuse me, a way car with a cut journal and nursed it
into Emporia. When they arrived, the conductor told the
cartoad about it. They did nothing. About an hour later
there was a orange glow at the west end of the eastbound
yard. The yard master was on the speakers telling the east
bound yard crew to stop what they were doing and reach in to
track number ( I do not remember the number) and pull the
burning way car up to the yard office as the fire dept. was
on their way. The hot box was the one under the tool locker
and the wood floor was oil soaked from the years of use. The
Way car was gutted.
If a hot box is set out, the train crew had to pull the
packing and make sure the fire was out.
When I was working at Topeka Ks on the UPRR a CRI&P east
bound passenger train came to town and made the station
stop. The rear brake man dropped off and stood about 10
yards behind the train. The rear journal on the rear truck
of the rear pullman was hot and on fire. When the train was
read to depart the rear man gave a high ball and the train
started to leave. The UPRR switch tender ran for the phone
and called the tower east of town and told the operator what
was happening and he set a red board on him. The UPRR
dispatcher called the CRI&P yard master and made him send a
switch engine over and pull the train back to their yard and
fix things. If he had been allowed to go they would probably
have scattered that train all over the place before the got
to KC.
So every road had their own way of handling a hot box. I
know first hand the UPRR and AT&SF carried tools to make
repairs when needed.
Thank you
Larry Jackman


Richard Hendrickson wrote:


I asked a conductor friend about a couple of questions that s


thompson@...
 

RIchard H. said:
True, no doubt, on many RRs. But out west, where freight trains ran
hundreds of miles in a day and it was often a long way between sidings,
spare brasses and suitable jacks were routinely carried in caboose tool
boxes. On the Santa Fe (and, I'm pretty sure, the UP and SP as well), the
equipment necessary to replace brasses was part of the inventory on every
caboose, and conductors were responsible for making sure it was there
before every trip.
And on some eastern roads, too. Various reminiscences I've read describe
such tools on eastern cabooses as well.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 http://www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroads and on Western history


Chet French <cfrench@...>
 

--- In STMFC@y..., Clark Propst <cepropst@r...> wrote:
.
.

2) Where did all the meat reefers actually end up, who were the real
customers? This fella started on the Milw, so he's been involved
with
all the major meat packers in the upper midwest. I'll make his very
long
and interesting story short. Answer, East. The meat was funneled
into
Chicago to the EJ&E, IHB or BRC. These roads would transfer blocks
across town on schedules in a guaranteed time, big recipient was the
NKP.
The Illinois Central delivered a large amount of PHP (packing house
products) off the Iowa Division to the IHB at Broadview,Ill. In the
steam days several sections of train 76 would cut off their caboose
and shove the entire train down to the IHB (50 or 60 cars). Quite
often crews going on duty at Freeport would receive a message
saying "Arrange to make cut-off time at Broadview". This eliminated
any operational sins. Cut-off time was 1:30pm. Most of the cars
would be handled to Blue Island and forwarded in evening NYC trains.
Alot of PFE traffic was also delivered to IHB.

Local cabooses on the IC had jacks and spare brass to repair hot
boxes set out. By the time I hired out in 1960, this practice had
been dicontinued.

Chet French


Clark Propst <cepropst@...>
 

Thanks for the info Chet. You're talking the same time frame as my
friend. One thing he said about the cut-off times was, "If we (Milw)
missed the cut-off times too often our traffic would soon be being
running on the Rock Island!"
Chet, what can you tell me about the Armour meat out off Mason City
IA?
Clark

Chet French wrote:

--- In STMFC@y..., Clark Propst <cepropst@r...> wrote:
.
.

2) Where did all the meat reefers actually end up, who were the real
customers? This fella started on the Milw, so he's been involved
with
all the major meat packers in the upper midwest. I'll make his very
long
and interesting story short. Answer, East. The meat was funneled
into
Chicago to the EJ&E, IHB or BRC. These roads would transfer blocks
across town on schedules in a guaranteed time, big recipient was the
NKP.
The Illinois Central delivered a large amount of PHP (packing house
products) off the Iowa Division to the IHB at Broadview,Ill. In the
steam days several sections of train 76 would cut off their caboose
and shove the entire train down to the IHB (50 or 60 cars). Quite
often crews going on duty at Freeport would receive a message
saying "Arrange to make cut-off time at Broadview". This eliminated
any operational sins. Cut-off time was 1:30pm. Most of the cars
would be handled to Blue Island and forwarded in evening NYC trains.
Alot of PFE traffic was also delivered to IHB.

Local cabooses on the IC had jacks and spare brass to repair hot
boxes set out. By the time I hired out in 1960, this practice had
been dicontinued.

Chet French










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