Resin Review


Bill Darnaby
 

I have recently finished assembling two different kits of the CNR 1924-29
40' single sheathed boxcar with dreadnought ends. One kit was by F&C (kit
6671) and one was by Kaslo Shops (kit HK-10).
Both kits built up into nice looking cars but the amount of effort required
in each was a bit different. The F&C kit contained more complete
instructions and a modest amount of prototype history and information plus
scale drawings. However, the photos included did not match the car in the
kit as the photos were of a car with wood ends. The kit also contained all
of the parts
necessary to complete the job.

The Kaslo kit had very minimal instructions
with the only drawing being of the brake equipment locations. The only
photo of the car is the one on top of the box but it isn't sharp enough for
good reference. In fact, in
my opinion, the Kaslo kit did not contain sufficient information to build
the car. I had to rely on the F&C information for that. On the other hand,
the Kaslo kit had superior castings, particularly of the underframe. The
carbody side channels were nicely undercut, although I had to repair a very
small broken out section of one, instead of the usual square sections and
the underframe had fine detail. The
resin material was gray. A nice touch was that the Kaslo kit provided 3
types of doors and the door opening in the side contained a grain door cast
in place should the modeler want to have the door open. The side corner
braces were nice separate castings

The F&C kit had
their usual white resin materail. Detail was not quite as sharp as Kaslo
but still very good and the side bracing is also undercut, more accurately
replicating the prototype angles. My kit had a Youngstown door cast in
place. The
underframe casting is one piece and a bit clunky, particularly compared to
Kaslo, as the flanged crossbearers and centersill had solid cast sections.
However, the underframe did have locators cast in place for the cylinder,
reservoir and
valve. The side corner ribs or braces were cast in place and the modeler
has to line them up with their extensions on the corners of the ends when
the ends. On the other
hand, Kaslo provides separate castings for these braces although I had to
refer to the F&C instructions to properly locate them.

The F&C kit included injection molded styrene ladders of the
Canadian version with the end step at the bottom of the end ladders. The
Kaslo kit included etched metal ladders of the same style. Both kits
provided Tichy brake sprues, plastic sill steps and wire grabs. The Kaslo
kit does not provide any wire or formed eyelts. F&C provided the usual
green wire which I discard anyway and replace with .010 and .015 brass wire.

Both kits are flat kits with one piece cast roofs and assemble in
the usual manner. One difference is that the Kaslo roof overlaps the ends
and the F&C ends overlap the roof. F&C provides decals and lettering
information. The
decals are not as crisp and sharp as they could be and are remenisent of the
old Walthers
decals. Kaslo provides no decals or lettering information and the modeler
is refered to a CDS dry transfer set. I am not in a position to comment on
the accuracy of the cars as I lack the prototype knowledge.

If this review is of interest to the list I can provide more as I am in the
middle of plowing through a large backlog of resin kits.

Regards,
Bill


Ted Culotta <ted_culotta@...>
 

Bill:

With your permission, I'd love to post this on the
Steam Era Freight Cars web site. If you have photos
of the finished models, that would be even better.
I'd love to add more than this one too, so if you're
interested, please keep them coming.

The site is at www.steamfreightcars.com.

Regards,
Ted

--- Bill Darnaby <WDarnaby@...> wrote:
I have recently finished assembling two different
kits of the CNR 1924-29
40' single sheathed boxcar with dreadnought ends.
One kit was by F&C (kit
6671) and one was by Kaslo Shops (kit HK-10).
Both kits built up into nice looking cars but the
amount of effort required
in each was a bit different. The F&C kit contained
more complete
instructions and a modest amount of prototype
history and information plus
scale drawings. However, the photos included did
not match the car in the
kit as the photos were of a car with wood ends. The
kit also contained all
of the parts
necessary to complete the job.

The Kaslo kit had very minimal instructions
with the only drawing being of the brake equipment
locations. The only
photo of the car is the one on top of the box but it
isn't sharp enough for
good reference. In fact, in
my opinion, the Kaslo kit did not contain sufficient
information to build
the car. I had to rely on the F&C information for
that. On the other hand,
the Kaslo kit had superior castings, particularly of
the underframe. The
carbody side channels were nicely undercut, although
I had to repair a very
small broken out section of one, instead of the
usual square sections and
the underframe had fine detail. The
resin material was gray. A nice touch was that the
Kaslo kit provided 3
types of doors and the door opening in the side
contained a grain door cast
in place should the modeler want to have the door
open. The side corner
braces were nice separate castings

The F&C kit had
their usual white resin materail. Detail was not
quite as sharp as Kaslo
but still very good and the side bracing is also
undercut, more accurately
replicating the prototype angles. My kit had a
Youngstown door cast in
place. The
underframe casting is one piece and a bit clunky,
particularly compared to
Kaslo, as the flanged crossbearers and centersill
had solid cast sections.
However, the underframe did have locators cast in
place for the cylinder,
reservoir and
valve. The side corner ribs or braces were cast in
place and the modeler
has to line them up with their extensions on the
corners of the ends when
the ends. On the other
hand, Kaslo provides separate castings for these
braces although I had to
refer to the F&C instructions to properly locate
them.

The F&C kit included injection molded styrene
ladders of the
Canadian version with the end step at the bottom of
the end ladders. The
Kaslo kit included etched metal ladders of the same
style. Both kits
provided Tichy brake sprues, plastic sill steps and
wire grabs. The Kaslo
kit does not provide any wire or formed eyelts. F&C
provided the usual
green wire which I discard anyway and replace with
.010 and .015 brass wire.

Both kits are flat kits with one piece cast roofs
and assemble in
the usual manner. One difference is that the Kaslo
roof overlaps the ends
and the F&C ends overlap the roof. F&C provides
decals and lettering
information. The
decals are not as crisp and sharp as they could be
and are remenisent of the
old Walthers
decals. Kaslo provides no decals or lettering
information and the modeler
is refered to a CDS dry transfer set. I am not in a
position to comment on
the accuracy of the cars as I lack the prototype
knowledge.

If this review is of interest to the list I can
provide more as I am in the
middle of plowing through a large backlog of resin
kits.

Regards,
Bill






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Ian Cranstone
 

From: "Bill Darnaby" <WDarnaby@...>
I have recently finished assembling two different kits of the CNR 1924-29
40' single sheathed boxcar with dreadnought ends. One kit was by F&C (kit
6671) and one was by Kaslo Shops (kit HK-10).
I'm not sure where the dates cited came from, but the models in question are
of the 1929 CN standard boxcar, built from 1929-31 by the three major
Canadian carbuilders as CN 503500-513152 (more details on series breakdowns
can be found at my website at: freightcars.nakina.net). The earlier CN 1923
standard boxcar, built from 1923-27 were probably the wood end cars that you
saw in the F&C instruction sheet. These cars were the prototype for the
Accurail 40' single-sheathed boxcar in plastic a few years back (and as a CN
modeller I have a few stashed on my unbuilt kit shelf).

I believe the F&C version is the former Steam Shack kit, whereas the Kaslo
kit is relatively new. There is also a one-piece resin version offered by
Sylvan. I have yet to build my Kaslo kit, but I have always been impressed
with the quality of Kaslo's castings, which seem very crisply detailed.

Stafford Swain had an article on these cars (and the Steam Shack kit) in the
June 1994 RMJ.

--
Ian Cranstone
Kanata, Ontario, Canada
lamontc@...


Gary Roe
 

Bill Darnaby wrote:

If this review is of interest to the list I can provide more as I am in the
middle of plowing through a large backlog of resin kits.




Bill,

This type of information is extremely helpful to someone like me who has yet
to construct his first resin kit (even tho I have quite a few).

gary roe


LAURANCE ROBERT KING <ab8180@...>
 

What is Kaslo's address?

LR King


Ian Cranstone
 

From: LAURANCE ROBERT KING <ab8180@...>
What is Kaslo's address?
They have a web page at:

http://vvv.com/~jwhitmore/

Also, a number of the Canadian hobby shops that provide mail order service
should be able to provide their kits as well.

--
Ian Cranstone
Kanata, Ontario, Canada
lamontc@...