Caboose brakes


philgulley
 

I am working on a batch of the new Walthers UP CA-1 cabooses.
They are nice models. But, I thought I would add, among other things,
basic brake rigging. I am of course familiar with the standard AB
arrangement, but this caboose has a brake wheel on BOTH ends. I would
think there would be a second rod... but where does it connect? Or,
perhaps does each brakewheel actuate the brakes only on the nearest
truck? I checked Don Strack's new UP caboose book, but found nothing
on brake arrangements. Thanks...


JGG KahnSr <jacekahn@...>
 

You have surely come to the right place, as there are probably at least ten or twelve genuine experts who can tell you more than you ever dreamed of about brake rigging. A short answer from very much a semi-expert is that there is an arrangment of extra brake levers so that the valve can be activated from either end, as most eight-wheel cabooses did have wheels on each end (some four-wheel bobbers also did, some only on one end). One set of standard K2 or AB brake components but extra levers. Retainer valves on both ends, too, as I recall.
Jace Kahn
Mostly Fairbanks

I am working on a batch of the new Walthers UP CA-1 cabooses.
They are nice models. But, I thought I would add, among other things,
basic brake rigging. I am of course familiar with the standard AB
arrangement, but this caboose has a brake wheel on BOTH ends. I would
think there would be a second rod... but where does it connect? Or,
perhaps does each brakewheel actuate the brakes only on the nearest
truck? I checked Don Strack's new UP caboose book, but found nothing
on brake arrangements. Thanks...



To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
STMFC-unsubscribe@...



Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/

_________________________________________________________________
Add photos to your messages with MSN 8. Get 2 months FREE*. http://join.msn.com/?page=features/featuredemail


Andy Cich <ajc5150@...>
 

I took a trip this past weekend, and spotted a caboose in a park. I often
wondered about the questions you are asking, and I did stop to take a look.
Either brake wheel operates the whole brake system. On the end that the
brake cylinder points to, the brake wheel was connected like a freight car
brake wheel. The rod from this wheel was connected to the lever that the
cylinder pushes on. The rod from the other end brake wheel ran down the
length of the caboose to just past the brake cylinder lever. There was an
extra lever (with pivot in the center) to reverse the motion. This lever
was connected to the chain that connected the "normal" brake wheel.

The caboose I looked at was an Illinois Central steel caboose. I am not
familiar with the foundation brake gear for the CA-1.

Since a picture is worth 1000 words, here is a sketch I made of the IC
caboose.

http://home.insightbb.com/~ajc5150/IC_caboose_brakes.gif

Use at your own risk for the CA-1. But I think it would be safe to say
either brake wheel operated the whole system.


Andy Cich

-----Original Message-----
I am working on a batch of the new Walthers UP CA-1 cabooses.
They are nice models. But, I thought I would add, among other things,
basic brake rigging. I am of course familiar with the standard AB
arrangement, but this caboose has a brake wheel on BOTH ends. I would
think there would be a second rod... but where does it connect? Or,
perhaps does each brakewheel actuate the brakes only on the nearest
truck? I checked Don Strack's new UP caboose book, but found nothing
on brake arrangements. Thanks...


Andy Cich <ajc5150@...>
 

I have a few more observations based on the IC caboose I looked at.

1. There was an addition to the "little buggers". An extra rod was
connected and the "little bugger" could be activated from within the cabin.

2. There was a "T" in one of the air lines to the reservoir. I don't
remember if it was the emergency or normal reservoir. I assume this tap was
for a pressure gauge within the cabin.

3. All that was left of the retainer line was a nipple on the AB valve.
I've heard some say there were two retainers on a caboose, and others say
there was one, but it was inside the cabin. I couldn't tell on this one
because whatever was there was gone.


Andy Cich


thompson@...
 

PHil Gulley asked:
I am working on a batch of the new Walthers UP CA-1 cabooses.
They are nice models. But, I thought I would add, among other things,
basic brake rigging. I am of course familiar with the standard AB
arrangement, but this caboose has a brake wheel on BOTH ends. I would
think there would be a second rod... but where does it connect? Or,
perhaps does each brakewheel actuate the brakes only on the nearest
truck?
Phil, I think cabooses always had a brake wheel at each end--for obvious
reasons. Ordinarily the first lever beyond the cylinder is just longer on a
caboose, extending across the center sill, and connecting to the rodding to
the hand brake on the other side. This is shown in several Cycs.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 http://www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroads and on Western history


JGG KahnSr <jacekahn@...>
 

Dear Tony
It is not often that I can second-guess you on freight car matters, but some of the four-wheel bobbers did, in fact, have only one brakewheel (notably the famous Reading ones), perhaps because it was not so far from one platform to the other as with eight-wheel cabooses.
Jace Kahn
Mostly Fairbanks

I think cabooses always had a brake wheel at each end--for obvious
reasons. Ordinarily the first lever beyond the cylinder is just longer on a
caboose, extending across the center sill, and connecting to the rodding to
the hand brake on the other side. This is shown in several Cycs.

Tony
_________________________________________________________________
The new MSN 8: advanced junk mail protection and 2 months FREE* http://join.msn.com/?page=features/junkmail


thompson@...
 

Jace Kahn said:
It is not often that I can second-guess you on freight car matters, but some
of the four-wheel bobbers did, in fact, have only one brakewheel (notably
the famous Reading ones), perhaps because it was not so far from one
platform to the other as with eight-wheel cabooses.
Okay, Jace, I should have said that STATISTICALLY cabooses always had two
brake wheels. I'm sure that there are 19th century cars without them.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 http://www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroads and on Western history


Don Strack <donstrack@...>
 

To all who are lamenting the lack of detailed brake information in the UPHS
UP caboose book.

I am embarassed to admit that the subject never crossed my much-befuddled
mind, nor did it come up among the reviewers, at least until Bill Metzger
asked, "So when did the CA-1s get power hand brakes?"

<big pause>

Umm...

I have copies of the general arrangement drawing for the CA-1, which
Walthers borrowed to make its great model. But it doesn't show brake
arrangement. As to when power brakes were applied, as Dick Harley wrote,
only additonal research will discover that data.

I have been asked why the Walthers model does not have a tool box (which may
or may not have later been a battery box, like on the steel cars). The
answer is that the drawing I sent Walthers did not have the tool box, but I
have another drawing that does have the tool box. I guess I should have
thought of that. Like I said, Umm...

I am working on a web page as a location to add updates and corrections for
the caboose book. Having brake information there seems like a good idea. The
next problem would be how to scan large drawings. I can convert them to PDF,
but they'd still be awful big files, as in almost 50 meg each.

Don Strack
http://utahrails.net