Milk Industry - Kansas


Rodney Smith <rodney_smith@...>
 

I am endeavouring to research the milk industry in & out of Kansas City in the post war years.
Particularly the type & ownership of freight cars used to carry this produce.
Any web site information would be grateful.

Rod Smith
Australia


Don Valentine
 

Quoting Rodney Smith <rodney_smith@optusnet.com.au>:

I am endeavouring to research the milk industry in & out of Kansas City
in the post war years.
Particularly the type & ownership of freight cars used to carry this
produce.
Any web site information would be grateful.

You may need to look into passenger cars as well, Rod, as most milk
cars were equipped for passenger train use.

Take care, Don Valentine


Benjamin Frank Hom <b.hom@...>
 

Rod Smith wrote:
I am endeavouring to research the milk industry in & out of Kansas City in
the post war years. Particularly the type & ownership of freight cars used
to carry this produce. Any web site information would be grateful.

Rod, you might want to post this question to the Milk Trains group - to
subscribe, e-mail milktrains-subscribe@yahoogroups.com .


Ben Hom


mbcarson2002
 

Rod Smith, from Australia, wrote in part;
"I am endeavouring to research the milk industry in & out of Kansas
City in the post war years. Particularly the type & ownership of
freight cars used to carry this produce. Any web site information
would be grateful."

Rod,

I am afraid you are going to be disappointed, as there was no milk
train service to Kansas City after the Second World War. The book,
The Milk Market Industry by Roadhouse & Henderson, states milk train
service in the Kansas City milk marketed ended by 1934. Evidently,
the road network around Kansas City was good enough to make milk
train service unnecessary. The major cities, still having milk
train service after WW II, were Boston, New York, and Chicago.

If you would to discuss milk trains further, I suggest you join us
on the yahoo milktrains group.

Regards, Mike Carson


jaley <jaley@...>
 

On Jul 9, 7:50am, Rodney Smith wrote:
Subject: [STMFC] Milk Industry - Kansas
I am endeavouring to research the milk industry in & out of Kansas City
in the post war years.
Particularly the type & ownership of freight cars used to carry this
produce.
Any web site information would be grateful.

Rod Smith
Australia

Rod,

Larry Jackman will certainly be able to tell you more, but from
what I can tell, there were no "milk cars" used in or out of KC. By that,
I mean the Pfaulder-type cars that were common in the eastern U.S.

Milk was shipped in cans in baggage cars or express reefers, from
what I can tell. I have photos of stacks of milk cans at the UP depot in
Topeka, KS in the 1950's.

Please let me know if you learn otherwise.

Thanks,

-Jeff

--
Jeff Aley jaley@pcocd2.intel.com
DPG Chipsets Product Engineering
Intel Corporation, Folsom, CA
(916) 356-3533


raildata@...
 

When Bob Mohowski and I did the series of articles in RMC on milk cars and
the dairy industry some years back we did extensive research to find milk
traffic and trains on rails lines other than those in the Norrtheast. Aside from
some in the Chicago area we could find no evedence of milk cars or trafffic other
than a few cars assigned to some local dairies. We had data and traffic flow
maps from the dairy industry, along with ORER data, etc.

From all our efforts we had to conclude that milk was not shipped very far in
those areas and what was handled by rail was in milk cans, probably in the
regular baggage / express cars.

In the intervening 20 or so years no new data had shown up. (Also no new
milkc ar photos or especially the color shots that everyone wants.

Chuck Yungkurth
Boulder CO


h81644 <H81644@...>
 

Hi Folks,
After doing some research here in the SW Iowa area and my Great
Grandfather owning a creamery in Dunlap, Iowa. Most milk was shipped
in cans and loaded into baggage cars. Even to the point of the
Burlington having an extra man in the baggage car to load/unload the
milk cans. The Omaha area was a major shipper of milk and cream
based products. Fairmont and Harding, both having facilities in
Omaha, having there own railcars and trucks. Milk was not shipped in
the same manner in the midwest as in the New England area.

George Walls
Treynor, Iowa

In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, raildata@a... wrote:
When Bob Mohowski and I did the series of articles in RMC on milk
cars and
the dairy industry some years back we did extensive research to
find milk
traffic and trains on rails lines other than those in the
Norrtheast. Aside from
some in the Chicago area we could find no evedence of milk cars or
trafffic other
than a few cars assigned to some local dairies. We had data and
traffic flow
maps from the dairy industry, along with ORER data, etc.

From all our efforts we had to conclude that milk was not shipped
very far in
those areas and what was handled by rail was in milk cans,
probably in the
regular baggage / express cars.

In the intervening 20 or so years no new data had shown up. (Also
no new
milkc ar photos or especially the color shots that everyone wants.

Chuck Yungkurth
Boulder CO



almabranch <harper-brown@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "h81644" <H81644@f...> wrote:
Hi Folks,
After doing some research here in the SW Iowa area and my Great
Grandfather owning a creamery in Dunlap, Iowa. Most milk was
shipped
in cans and loaded into baggage cars.
This coincides with info. from people who worked the Alma
branch. "Cream cans" were put out on the depot platform for pickup.
The former agent at Hessdale said the milk would get hot and "boil
over."

Jared Harper


ron christensen
 

They must have been shipping milk into Omaha. I
believe the CNW and maybe the IC went through Dunlap.
Milk had different requirements than cream.
we sold cream to the J H Neil creamery in Tama Iowa.
We would separate the milk each night and keep the
cream in a can in the cave, until Saturday. I'm sure
this cream went into butter. Just think about cream
standing in a can for 6 days in the summer time. The
cave was about 60 degrees. The milking area didn't
have to be anything special. My dad milked out side
most of his farming life. He just gave the cow a pail
of grain and sit down on a 1 legged stool made from a
short board nailed to a piece of firewood and went to
work milking.
There were few dairies around Tama, Of course we had
our own milk.
Ron Christensen

--- almabranch <harper-brown@juno.com> wrote:
--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "h81644" <H81644@f...>
wrote:
Hi Folks,
After doing some research here in the SW Iowa area
and my Great
Grandfather owning a creamery in Dunlap, Iowa.
Most milk was
shipped
in cans and loaded into baggage cars.
This coincides with info. from people who worked the
Alma
branch. "Cream cans" were put out on the depot
platform for pickup.
The former agent at Hessdale said the milk would get
hot and "boil
over."

Jared Harper


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Steve Sandifer <jssand@...>
 

I have a mid 20s photo of the depot at Moline KS with at least a dozen tall milk cans by the freight end. There was a dairy at Moline, so these could have been empties going back.

--------------------
J. Stephen (Steve) Sandifer
mailto:steve.sandifer@swcentral.org
Home: 12027 Mulholland Dr., Meadows Place, TX 77477, 281-568-9918
Office: Southwest Central Church of Christ, 4011 W. Bellfort, Houston, TX 77025, 713-667-9417
Personal: http://users2.ev1.net/~jssand/index.htm
Church: http://www.swcentral.org
Railway: http://www.trainweb.org/jssand
Webmaster: http://www.ATSFRR.net

----- Original Message -----
From: almabranch
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Friday, July 11, 2003 5:10 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Milk Industry - Kansas


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "h81644" <H81644@f...> wrote:
> Hi Folks,
> After doing some research here in the SW Iowa area and my Great
> Grandfather owning a creamery in Dunlap, Iowa. Most milk was
shipped
> in cans and loaded into baggage cars.

This coincides with info. from people who worked the Alma
branch. "Cream cans" were put out on the depot platform for pickup.
The former agent at Hessdale said the milk would get hot and "boil
over."

Jared Harper


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Roger Miener <Roger.Miener@...>
 

Ben Horn informs ...

Rod, you might want to post this question to the Milk Trains group -
to
subscribe, e-mail milktrains-subscribe@yahoogroups.com .
For crying out loud, there is actually a list devoted to milk trains?
This is bizarre. Will there then soon be a list devoted solely to
milk trains that served Bowman Dairy in Chicago? Bowman's slogan,
"Bowman on milk is like sterling on silver." Geesh, talk about half
the distance to the goal line -- I think that these lists are getting
to be a little bit too special. Yes?

Roger Miener
at Tacoma WA


Schuyler G Larrabee <SGL2@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
From: "Roger Miener" <Roger.Miener@worldnet.att.net>

For crying out loud, there is actually a list devoted to milk trains?
This is bizarre. **snip** I think that these lists are getting
to be a little bit too special. Yes?
No.

When you have a specific question, these lists provide the Right Place To
Go. Roger, would you go to your local library to look up the laws for the
cases you're responsible for? No. You go to your law library. Specialists
are worth the price of admission, and price of admission to the University
of Milk Cars is, in this case, pretty damn low.

Now when I had some Very Specific Questions about locomotive horns (properly
called air whistles, don't you know?) I joined the appropriate Yahoo list,
lurked for a couple weeks to get the drift, and asked my questions. Got
good, worthwhile answers, and got the heck out of there. (Not that they're
strange people, or anything. Complaining about their neighbors in the
condominium who complain about their blowing their "air whistles" at 2 AM .
. . !!)

SGL


Don Valentine
 

Quoting Schuyler G Larrabee <SGL2@ix.netcom.com>:


----- Original Message -----
From: "Roger Miener" <Roger.Miener@worldnet.att.net>

For crying out loud, there is actually a list devoted to milk trains?
**snip** I think that these lists are getting to be a little bit too
special. Yes?

No.

When you have a specific question, these lists provide the Right Place
To Go.
Aw, c'mon Schuyler. While it appears not to be the case in the rest of
the country, we both know that here in the northeast (N.Y. and Pa. as well
as New England in this instance) some milk trains were really little more
than freight trains dedicated to one commodity or business with an
accomodation coach tacked onto the rear end. The Rutland's "Tin Can" and
B&M Trains #49 and #49 are good examples of this. Both were really freight
trains and therefore it would seem such equipment and related topics would
be appropriate under this list as well as on a special milk train list. I
gather that Rob Davis is doing a pretty good job with his milk train list
but don't know that it gives him any "exclusive rights" on the topic.

Best wishes, Don Valentine


Schuyler G Larrabee <SGL2@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
From: <newrail@sover.net>

Don says, regarding Milk Trains:

Both were really freight
trains and therefore it would seem such equipment and related topics would
be appropriate under this list as well as on a special milk train list. I
gather that Rob Davis is doing a pretty good job with his milk train list
but don't know that it gives him any "exclusive rights" on the topic.
Exclusive rights? I didn't say that. And I don't disagree that we can talk
about Milk Trains too. But like I DID say, "these lists provide the Right
Place To
Go. . . . . Specialists
are worth the price of admission/"

And I still think that's so, especially when you have a specific question,
as I did about horns.

SGL


Jack Mullen <mullen.lahr@...>
 

Roger Miener exclaimed:


For crying out loud, there is actually a list devoted to milk trains?
This is bizarre. Will there then soon be a list devoted solely to
milk trains that served Bowman Dairy in Chicago? Bowman's slogan,
"Bowman on milk is like sterling on silver." Geesh, talk about half
the distance to the goal line -- I think that these lists are getting
to be a little bit too special. Yes?
yes, there is such a list, and it's pretty active. I suspect some but
not all of the milk trains listers are also in the STMFC sphere of
influence, but the milk list gets deeper (or farther afield) into milk
industry topics than might be acceptable here. One of the nice things
about e-groups is that they can accomodate some very focused
interests, which just might bore anyone else to tears!

BTW, my recollection is that it was Wanzer that was like sterling.
Bowman's slogan was the comparatively dull "Milk of Superior Flavor".
(I wish I could find evidence that they had used their bow-and-arrow
logo on railcars, but as far as I know it only appeared on trucks.)
Both firms used milk tank cars in the Chicago area. Bowman was an
early user, with a sizeable fleet.

Jack Mullen


Douglas Harding <dharding@...>
 

Have you heard the expressing of "sweet cream" and "sour cream". Sweet
cream is fresh cream ie that which stayed cool, or refrigerated. Sour
cream is from the cans that sat on the shipping dock in the sun far too
long. Next time you are at the grocery, look at the butter. Notice some
butter is advertised as being made with "sweet cream", this meaning
fresh cream, or cream that was refrigerated.

Doug Harding
Iowa Central Railroad
www.iowatelecom.net/~dharding/