BAR Reefer


George Hollwedel <georgeloop@...>
 

I have a two part BAR reefer question.
When did they start painting them yellow or orange?
Would a load of Maine potatoes ever have made it's way to California?

Thanks for any help!

George Hollwedel
Prototype N Scale Models
georgeloop@...


Tim O'Connor
 

SP/PFE borrowed lots of reefers in the off-season from BAR. Early
1960's photos of Donner pass show lots of BAR reefers, plus C&NW/NWX
reefers mixed in with PFE reefers. Before the mid 1950's, I don't
think the BAR had enough reefers to make a notable contribution to
traffic in California.

Maine potatoes were shipped mostly in the cold months beginning with
the September harvest and continuing through the winter. They were
usually more concerned with freezing than with keeping the loads cold.


I have a two part BAR reefer question.
When did they start painting them yellow or orange?
Would a load of Maine potatoes ever have made it's way to California?

Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> -->> NOTE EMAIL CHANGE <<--
Sterling, Massachusetts


Don Valentine
 

Quoting George Hollwedel <georgeloop@...>:

I have a two part BAR reefer question.
When did they start painting them yellow or orange?
Would a load of Maine potatoes ever have made it's way to California?

I'm not dead certain on the shift to orange paint for BAR reefers, George,
but believe it was in the 1960's. Maine potatoes making it to California is
a bit of a stretch unless processed by McCain's into, what's the proper term
since we can't call the "French" fries anymore? In other words, as frozen
food, possibly, as bagged potatoes for sale it's not very likely. Too many
Idaho's and others around I suspect.

Take care, Don Valentine


SHAY STARK
 

--- In STMFC@..., newrail@s... wrote:
Maine potatoes making it to California is
a bit of a stretch unless processed by McCain's into, what's the
proper term
since we can't call the "French" fries anymore? In other words, as
frozen
food, possibly, as bagged potatoes for sale it's not very likely.
Too many
Idaho's and others around I suspect.

Take care, Don Valentine
Don,

I agree with you that Maine potatoes in California or any other
Western state might not be extremely common but it did happen with
some regularity on a small scale. Hod Sanders founded a regional
snack food company in the mid 40's called Clover Club. He started
out of his garage and then a couple years later built a plant in
Kaysville, Utah. In the late 40's and early 50's he received
carloads of potatoes from Maine on a regular basis. It is rumored
that he felt Maine potatoes made a crisper chip due to the variety
grown and the growing conditions.

On a similar note E.F. Mariani had a dry ice business in Salt Lake
City. He purchased his ice from back east. I have seen many photos
of wooden MDT refers on the local railroads that served his
warehouse. I have often wondered why he chose to purchase dry ice
from the east coast when there were several plants manufacturing dry
ice in the Western United States. I am happy about it though as it
means I get to have a couple of MDT refers for variety.

Shay Stark


SHAY STARK
 

--- In STMFC@..., "shaystark" <SHAYS@A...> wrote:

I agree with you that Maine potatoes in California or any other
Western state might not be extremely common but it did happen with
some regularity on a small scale. Hod Sanders founded a regional
snack food company in the mid 40's called Clover Club. He started
out of his garage and then a couple years later built a plant in
Kaysville, Utah. In the late 40's and early 50's he received
carloads of potatoes from Maine on a regular basis. It is rumored
that he felt Maine potatoes made a crisper chip due to the variety
grown and the growing conditions.
I got home from work and looked up my notes on Clover Club to see
what additional information I might have. In doing so I realized
that I had a couple of points wrong in the previious post. That is
what happens when I go from memory. I will try to correct it here.
Clover Club began in 1938. The potato chips were prepared in the
Sanders garage for several years and used Utah potatoes. In 1948
they built a factory in Kaysville, Utah. As the business grew they
were unable to purchase enough Utah potatoes to keep up with demand.
Sometime between 1949 and 1952 they built a single car siding into
the factory and began supplementing the Utah potatoes with Maine
potatoes. A note in a local County history states that Clover Club
received Maine potatoes in wooden ice refers. My uncle who was a
freight and passenger motorman for the Bamberger at this time told
me that he remembers red, white and blue State of Maine insulated
boxcars being spotted at the plant.

The supplement of Maine potatoes usually began in the spring
depending on the availibility of the local crop and continued
through the summer. When this occurred the company would receive one
car a week. Clover Club seemed to think that this was a novel idea
and advertised the use of Maine potatoes.

This part of the Bamberger line was abandoned in January 1959 and
thus direct shipments to the factory ended at that time. In 1958
Clover Club may not have received many cars of potatoes as there
were less than 100 cars spotted along the Bamberger line in Davis
County during that year. While incomming coal traffic was dwindeling
because of the development of natural gas, Outgoing perishible
traffic was still strong in the County at this time meaning that
much of that 100 cars were outgoing. I don't have any records to
show exact break down but I do have a break down of how many cars
were spotted on team tracks versus at customer locations. The number
of cars on team tracks far surpassed the number of cars delivered to
customers. This was Bambergers arguement for abandonment as the
Union Pacific and Denver & Rio Grande Western parralleled the line
and had team tracks with in a mile or two of Bambergers. I don't
know what Clover Club did after the rail connection was removed.

Shay Stark


ljack70117@...
 

Just for the record. We had Maine Spuds in Salina Ks to at least 1954.
Thank you
Larry Jackman

On Thursday, October 2, 2003, at 11:42 AM, shaystark wrote:

--- In STMFC@..., "shaystark" <SHAYS@A...> wrote:

I agree with you that Maine potatoes in California or any other
Western state might not be extremely common but it did happen with
some regularity on a small scale. Hod Sanders founded a regional
snack food company in the mid 40's called Clover Club. He started
out of his garage and then a couple years later built a plant in
Kaysville, Utah. In the late 40's and early 50's he received
carloads of potatoes from Maine on a regular basis. It is rumored
that he felt Maine potatoes made a crisper chip due to the variety
grown and the growing conditions.
I got home from work and looked up my notes on Clover Club to see
what additional information I might have. In doing so I realized
that I had a couple of points wrong in the previious post. That is
what happens when I go from memory. I will try to correct it here.
Clover Club began in 1938. The potato chips were prepared in the
Sanders garage for several years and used Utah potatoes. In 1948
they built a factory in Kaysville, Utah. As the business grew they
were unable to purchase enough Utah potatoes to keep up with demand.
Sometime between 1949 and 1952 they built a single car siding into
the factory and began supplementing the Utah potatoes with Maine
potatoes. A note in a local County history states that Clover Club
received Maine potatoes in wooden ice refers. My uncle who was a
freight and passenger motorman for the Bamberger at this time told
me that he remembers red, white and blue State of Maine insulated
boxcars being spotted at the plant.

The supplement of Maine potatoes usually began in the spring
depending on the availibility of the local crop and continued
through the summer. When this occurred the company would receive one
car a week. Clover Club seemed to think that this was a novel idea
and advertised the use of Maine potatoes.

This part of the Bamberger line was abandoned in January 1959 and
thus direct shipments to the factory ended at that time. In 1958
Clover Club may not have received many cars of potatoes as there
were less than 100 cars spotted along the Bamberger line in Davis
County during that year. While incomming coal traffic was dwindeling
because of the development of natural gas, Outgoing perishible
traffic was still strong in the County at this time meaning that
much of that 100 cars were outgoing. I don't have any records to
show exact break down but I do have a break down of how many cars
were spotted on team tracks versus at customer locations. The number
of cars on team tracks far surpassed the number of cars delivered to
customers. This was Bambergers arguement for abandonment as the
Union Pacific and Denver & Rio Grande Western parralleled the line
and had team tracks with in a mile or two of Bambergers. I don't
know what Clover Club did after the rail connection was removed.

Shay Stark


------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor ---------------------~-->
Buy Ink Cartridges or Refill Kits for your HP, Epson, Canon or Lexmark
Printer at MyInks.com. Free s/h on orders $50 or more to the US & Canada.
http://www.c1tracking.com/l.asp?cid=5511
http://us.click.yahoo.com/mOAaAA/3exGAA/qnsNAA/9MtolB/TM
---------------------------------------------------------------------
~->

To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
STMFC-unsubscribe@...



Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/