Truck dimensions


cvfanbratt <cvfanbratt@...>
 

I am doing my first car drawings in AutoCAD and need some information
on truck dimensions. It would appear logical to me that all 33"
diameter wheel trucks should have had a very close dimension from
rail top to the center plate. If not, then replacing an archbar with
an Andrews would have been a nightmare.

Did the ARA, ARR, USRA or other groups have standard truck dimensions?
If so, where can I find this information. Also, does anyone on the
list also use AutoCAD or other programs to produce car drawings? I'd
like to see if there are people interested in sharing appliance
drawings. (Brake components, trucks, draft gear, underframes, etc.)
(I am working on leaf spring archbar trucks for the current drawing.)

For those who may be interested, I am drawing Central Vermont's
flangers.

Thanks in advance for any info you can supply.

Jeff Lodge


Richard Hendrickson
 

I am doing my first car drawings in AutoCAD and need some information
on truck dimensions. It would appear logical to me that all 33"
diameter wheel trucks should have had a very close dimension from
rail top to the center plate. If not, then replacing an archbar with
an Andrews would have been a nightmare.

Did the ARA, ARR, USRA or other groups have standard truck dimensions?
If so, where can I find this information.
Jeff, you're right that there were standards, though not a single standard.
Their evolution is well documented in the various editions of the Car
Builders' Cyclopedias.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


Dave Nelson <muskoka@...>
 

Yes but unfortunately for the cad enthusiast only a small number of
dimensions are documented. It'a very hard to find enough information in
those drawings to be able to "re-"draw any of the trucks.

Dave Nelson

-----Original Message-----
From: Richard Hendrickson [mailto:rhendrickson@opendoor.com]

Jeff, you're right that there were standards, though not a single standard.
Their evolution is well documented in the various editions of the Car
Builders' Cyclopedias.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Jeff Lodge asked:
I am doing my first car drawings in AutoCAD and need some information
on truck dimensions. It would appear logical to me that all 33"
diameter wheel trucks should have had a very close dimension from
rail top to the center plate. If not, then replacing an archbar with
an Andrews would have been a nightmare.
Did the ARA, ARR, USRA or other groups have standard truck dimensions?
If so, where can I find this information.
Jeff, the center plate height DID change from archbars to later cast-steel trucks, one reason many roads scrapped rather than re-truck their older cars when archbars were finally banned. As Richard said, these dimensions can be found in CBC volumes. IIRC the center-plate height became standard about 1930 under ARA direction and remained fixed through at least the 1950s. Guy WIlber may know the exact dates of such changes.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Alan C. Welch <acwelch@...>
 

At 07:34 AM 2/21/2004 -0800, you wrote:
Yes but unfortunately for the cad enthusiast only a small number of
dimensions are documented. It'a very hard to find enough information in
those drawings to be able to "re-"draw any of the trucks.

Dave Nelson
I have done quite a few drawings of prototype equipment using CAD, not that the drawing medium matters.

The drawings in the CBCs are generally very carefully drawn and once one determines the scale in which they are printed, they can be a very good source of dimensions, especially if you keep in mind that the decimal inch was not in use. This means that one can count on the dimensions to be in fractions of an inch, usually no finer gradation than 1/8".

You can often find a feature on the drawing, such as a key dimension or a wheel diameter that will enable the scale to be determined fairly easily. Photos are also amenable to this type of interpretation and the advent of Photoshop has made this much easier. Drawings and photos can be scanned and imported into the drafting program. Once the scale is known, one can draw over the scan. There is a bit of an art to this and if anyone is interested in hearing more, you can contact me.

Al Welch


Mike Turner <yardcoolieyahoo@...>
 

Although this is definitely off topic for this list, a couple of years ago one of the cad magazines had an ad for some 3d software package and the 3d drawing shown was of a Blomberg truck. I wish I had been smart enought to contact that company to get a copy of that file.

Mike Turner
Simpsonville, SC

Dave Nelson wrote:

Yes but unfortunately for the cad enthusiast only a small number of
dimensions are documented. It'a very hard to find enough information in
those drawings to be able to "re-"draw any of the trucks.
Dave Nelson