Loads: Weight of steel beams


Paul Lyons
 

Scott-Your question is unanswerable in HO scale. Wide flange and "I" beam
sections come in many different weights depending on the thickness of the flange
and web. I don't have a Steel Handbook here at the house to give you actual
numbers, but a 24' deep "I" beam can probably have 10 different weights
depending on the rolling section sizes.
Paul Lyons
Oceanside, CA


Scott Pitzer
 

I've prepared some Plastruct #90519 I-beams in 44-foot lengths to go in a 52-foot gon. They scale out to about 40" high and 20" wide at the base. How many of these does it take to approach the 155000 lbs. load limit of the car?

Scott Pitzer


Scott Pitzer
 

Looking at an AAR loading diagram, I was headed toward two stacks of four, which would be taller than the sides of the car and require bracing. But it seems like fairly hefty stuff (6" thick just about everywhere) so I wondered if I was overloading the car.
Now, if it happens to turn out that five lengths is more appropriate, is it kosher to load them side by side, on edge? The diagram says bracing is not needed if the load does not exceed the height of the sides and there is no more than 18" open space across the width of the car. (Yes, I realize that the number of items per car is not supposed to be based on "what fits neatly without too much hassle" but I'm asking anyway!)
Scott Pitzer
=======
Paul Lyons wrote:

Wide flange and "I" beam
sections come in many different weights depending on the thickness of the flange
and web


George Hollwedel <georgeloop1338@...>
 

Wow, they are pretty light, must take a million or so!

Scott Pitzer <scottp459@...> wrote:
I've prepared some Plastruct #90519 I-beams in 44-foot lengths to go in a 52-foot gon. They scale out to about 40" high and 20" wide at the base. How many of these does it take to approach the 155000 lbs. load limit of the car?

Scott Pitzer





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Michael Aufderheide <maufderheideyfp@...>
 

--- Scott Pitzer <scottp459@...> wrote:

I've prepared some Plastruct #90519 I-beams in
44-foot lengths to go in a 52-foot gon. They scale
out to about 40" high and 20" wide at the base. How
many of these does it take to approach the 155000
lbs. load limit of the car?

Scott Pitzer
Scott,

These are big sections. Generally the largest section
listed as a standard available depth is 36". The
width of the flanges is approximately 12 or 16 inches.
These range from 135 to 300 lbs per linear foot.
It's too early for me to do any math, so I'll leave
that up to you!

Regards,

Mike




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yardcoolieyahoo@...
 

I would measure the volume of one of the plastruct pieces by inserting a known length into a graduated cylinder with water. Using that, the volume per unit length can be calculated by dividing by the length inserted. Convert this measurement to prototype dimensions. Multiply by the density of steel and you get the weight per unit length. Multiply by length to get total weight. Can you tell I'm an engineer? :)

Mike "EE" Turner
Simpsonville, SC


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Scott Pitzer wrote:
I've prepared some Plastruct #90519 I-beams in 44-foot lengths to go in a 52-foot gon. They scale out to about 40" high and 20" wide at the base. How many of these does it take to approach the 155000 lbs. load limit of the car?
Measure the ACTUAL thicknesses of web and flange, convert to prototype dimensions, multiply out to get volume, then convert to metric. Steel weighs 8 grams per cubic centimeter. Then convert grams to pounds and you're done.
Those Plastruct beams are such heavy sections, I bet you will find you can't shipp all that many.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Andy Miller <asmiller@...>
 

Scott,

Try:
http://www.vernonsteel.com/v09.htm

This table (found from Google) shows various I beams. The first column
lists beams by height and weight per foot. For each beam the flange width
and various thickness are shown in successive columns.


Pick the beam with the height and flange width you have, and use the
heaviest weight since Plastruct ABS shapes (the dark grey stuff) are
terribly overheavy. Plastruct and Evergreen also make a more scale section
beam in styrene which I have used for gon loads.

Regards,

Andy Miller

-----Original Message-----
From: Anthony Thompson [mailto:thompson@...]
Sent: Friday, April 23, 2004 11:29 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Loads: Weight of steel beams


Scott Pitzer wrote:
I've prepared some Plastruct #90519 I-beams in 44-foot lengths to go
in a 52-foot gon. They scale out to about 40" high and 20" wide at the
base. How many of these does it take to approach the 155000 lbs. load
limit of the car?


almabranch <harper-brown@...>
 

On Ted Culotta's freight car website there is a photo (Nov. 2002
shot of the month) that show I-beams loaded in a gondola.

Jared Harper
Athens, GA


Fred Swanson <fredswanson@...>
 

-A w40x326 is 40" tall by 326 pounds per foot and is 17.91wide. So
that would make one beam 44' long 14344lb. This is the largest 40"
beam that I know of. I hope this helps.
Fred Swanson

-- In STMFC@..., Scott Pitzer <scottp459@e...> wrote:

I've prepared some Plastruct #90519 I-beams in 44-foot lengths to
go in a 52-foot gon. They scale out to about 40" high and 20" wide
at the base. How many of these does it take to approach the 155000
lbs. load limit of the car?

Scott Pitzer


Scott Pitzer
 

Based on Mike Aufderheide's and Fred Swanson's replies, it seems that my eight 44' beams would be somewhere around 120,000 lbs., so I think I'll go with that.
But I also tried mixing parts of other replies... to fit my "abilities" and I know my answer was wrong. Would anyone like to try to figure out why?
Not having a graduated cylinder, I stuck all eight beams halfway into a measuring cup (that's as far as they'd go) and I divided the resulting displacement to come up with 3 ml (or 3 cc) displaced by one whole beam. Since it's already a volume measure, I only have to multiply by 87 to convert for HO scale, correct? (Not 87x87x87 as when starting with lengths.) So 3cc scales out to 261cc.
If a cc of steel weighs 8 grams, then the prototype steel beam would weigh 261x8= 2088 grams. If there are about 454 grams in a pound, then the 44' beam only weighs 4 1/2 pounds!
?????

Scott Pitzer


Richard White
 

Dear Scott,
I don't want to sound patronising but you have made a common error - 1:87 is
the linear scale, but since you are converting volume you need to cube it,
to give you a multiplier of 658,503.
Try that and see if you don't come out a bit closer.
Regards
Richard White

----- Original Message -----
From: Scott Pitzer <scottp459@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Saturday, April 24, 2004 7:07 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Loads: Weight of steel beams


Based on Mike Aufderheide's and Fred Swanson's replies, it seems that my
eight 44' beams would be somewhere around 120,000 lbs., so I think I'll go
with that.
But I also tried mixing parts of other replies... to fit my "abilities"
and I know my answer was wrong. Would anyone like to try to figure out why?
Not having a graduated cylinder, I stuck all eight beams halfway into a
measuring cup (that's as far as they'd go) and I divided the resulting
displacement to come up with 3 ml (or 3 cc) displaced by one whole beam.
Since it's already a volume measure, I only have to multiply by 87 to
convert for HO scale, correct? (Not 87x87x87 as when starting with
lengths.) So 3cc scales out to 261cc.
If a cc of steel weighs 8 grams, then the prototype steel beam would weigh
261x8= 2088 grams. If there are about 454 grams in a pound, then the 44'
beam only weighs 4 1/2 pounds!
?????

Scott Pitzer





Yahoo! Groups Links





Scott Pitzer
 

The reason I didn't want to believe it was supposed to be 87 cubed (in this conversion) was that I tried it out to see if it would be in the ballpark. That makes each beam about 35,000 pounds, more than twice the weight estimated by others. These Plastructs are hefty in cross section, but are they THAT hefty? By the way, I'm talking about #90519, 7/16 white styrene, not the ABS product.
It's okay with me if I end up with four beams, tucked in below the height of the sides... especially if these beams are so unusually large (better to hide them a bit.)
Scott Pitzer
-----------------
Dear Scott,
I don't want to sound patronising but you have made a common error - 1:87 is
the linear scale, but since you are converting volume you need to cube it,
to give you a multiplier of 658,503.
Try that and see if you don't come out a bit closer.
Regards
Richard White
-------------------
Based on Mike Aufderheide's and Fred Swanson's replies, it seems that my
eight 44' beams would be somewhere around 120,000 lbs., so I think I'll go
with that.
But I also tried mixing parts of other replies... to fit my "abilities"
and I know my answer was wrong. Would anyone like to try to figure out why?
Not having a graduated cylinder, I stuck all eight beams halfway into a
measuring cup (that's as far as they'd go) and I divided the resulting
displacement to come up with 3 ml (or 3 cc) displaced by one whole beam.
Since it's already a volume measure, I only have to multiply by 87 to
convert for HO scale, correct? (Not 87x87x87 as when starting with
lengths.) So 3cc scales out to 261cc.
If a cc of steel weighs 8 grams, then the prototype steel beam would weigh
261x8= 2088 grams. If there are about 454 grams in a pound, then the 44'
beam only weighs 4 1/2 pounds!
?????

Scott Pitzer





Yahoo! Groups Links








Yahoo! Groups Links


Fred Swanson <fredswanson@...>
 

35000lb make sense. That would make it about 795lb a foot which
would make the web about 2 inches thick. there is a W40x655. It
measures 43.62" tall with flanges 16.87" wide and 1.93 thick. The
one I quoted earlier measured 40" tall by 17.91" wide and .91"
thick. I got this information from one of those spiral bound books.
This one is from PDM Steel. They are still in business and have a
website with a catalog that has measurements of there products
includeing all the stuff that would have been shipped by rail during
the steam age.
Fred Swanson

--- In STMFC@..., Scott Pitzer <scottp459@e...> wrote:
The reason I didn't want to believe it was supposed to be 87 cubed
(in this conversion) was that I tried it out to see if it would be in
the ballpark. That makes each beam about 35,000 pounds, more than
twice the weight estimated by others. These Plastructs are hefty in
cross section, but are they THAT hefty? By the way, I'm talking
about #90519, 7/16 white styrene, not the ABS product.
It's okay with me if I end up with four beams, tucked in below the
height of the sides... especially if these beams are so unusually
large (better to hide them a bit.)
Scott Pitzer


Fred Swanson <fredswanson@...>
 

35000lb make sense. That would make it about 795lb a foot which
would make the web about 2 inches thick. there is a W40x655. It
measures 43.62" tall with flanges 16.87" wide and 1.93 thick. The
one I quoted earlier measured 40" tall by 17.91" wide and .91"
thick. I got this information from one of those spiral bound books.
This one is from PDM Steel. They are still in business and have a
website with a catalog that has measurements of there products
includeing all the stuff that would have been shipped by rail during
the steam age.
Fred Swanson

--- In STMFC@..., Scott Pitzer <scottp459@e...> wrote:
The reason I didn't want to believe it was supposed to be 87 cubed
(in this conversion) was that I tried it out to see if it would be in
the ballpark. That makes each beam about 35,000 pounds, more than
twice the weight estimated by others. These Plastructs are hefty in
cross section, but are they THAT hefty? By the way, I'm talking
about #90519, 7/16 white styrene, not the ABS product.
It's okay with me if I end up with four beams, tucked in below the
height of the sides... especially if these beams are so unusually
large (better to hide them a bit.)
Scott Pitzer


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Fred Swanson wrote:
-A w40x326 is 40" tall by 326 pounds per foot and is 17.91wide. So
that would make one beam 44' long 14344lb. This is the largest 40"
beam that I know of. I hope this helps.
Betcha the section weight of a Plastruct beam is more than this.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history