UTLX Tankcars


Brian J Carlson <brian@...>
 

I was looking through my new Precision Scale HO & HOn3 Passenger and Freight
car Super-detailing Parts and Kits Catalog and on page 45 I came upon two
UTLX tankcar kits. Kit one is a frameless tank car and kit 2 is a narrow
frame tank car. I was wondering what prototype class this car is, if any?
I assume that the kit is for an early prototype but would like to know for
sure. I am always looking for appropriate tank cars to add to my circa 1957
fleet.

Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY


Scott Pitzer
 

Railroad Model Craftsman
December 1995
Article by Richard Hendrickson

Yes, you MIGHT be able to justify one in 1957.

Scott Pitzer

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian J Carlson <brian@...>
Sent: Apr 23, 2004 9:29 PM
To: stmfc@...
Subject: [STMFC] UTLX Tankcars

I was looking through my new Precision Scale HO & HOn3 Passenger and Freight
car Super-detailing Parts and Kits Catalog and on page 45 I came upon two
UTLX tankcar kits. Kit one is a frameless tank car and kit 2 is a narrow
frame tank car. I was wondering what prototype class this car is, if any?
I assume that the kit is for an early prototype but would like to know for
sure. I am always looking for appropriate tank cars to add to my circa 1957
fleet.

Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY





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Richard Hendrickson
 

I was looking through my new Precision Scale HO & HOn3 Passenger and Freight
car Super-detailing Parts and Kits Catalog and on page 45 I came upon two
UTLX tankcar kits. Kit one is a frameless tank car and kit 2 is a narrow
frame tank car. I was wondering what prototype class this car is, if any?
I assume that the kit is for an early prototype but would like to know for
sure. I am always looking for appropriate tank cars to add to my circa 1957
fleet.

Brian J Carlson P.E.
Brian, both kits are for narrow gauge cars as used on the D&RGW 3' gauge
lines in the 1930s through '50s. There is also a standard gauge kit for
the frameless car, which is essentially the same kit but with (incorrect)
standard gauge trucks. When the Rio Grande needed NG tank cars in the
'30s, UTLX fashioned them by modifying standard gauge Van Dyke frameless
cars, so Prec. Scale has reversed the prototype process in this regard.
Some years ago I used a PC kit to model a standard gauge Van Dyke car and
wrote an article about it, but that won't help you any because the Van Dyke
cars (UTLX class V) were all retired by 1953, though the versions with
steel center sills lasted much longer than that.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

Richard Hendrickson wrote:



Brian, both kits are for narrow gauge cars as used on the D&RGW 3' gauge
lines in the 1930s through '50s. There is also a standard gauge kit for
the frameless car, which is essentially the same kit but with (incorrect)
standard gauge trucks. When the Rio Grande needed NG tank cars in the
'30s, UTLX fashioned them by modifying standard gauge Van Dyke frameless
cars, so Prec. Scale has reversed the prototype process in this regard.
Some years ago I used a PC kit to model a standard gauge Van Dyke car and
wrote an article about it, but that won't help you any because the Van Dyke
cars (UTLX class V) were all retired by 1953, though the versions with
steel center sills lasted much longer than that.
In 1953, UTLX began to develop a frameless car again. This one they called the "hot dog." It was a controversial design and, thus, was subject to many tests. The 1953 design was instigated by an attempt to reduce or eliminate the need for tank bands - the circular straps around the tank attaching it to the underframe. These bands were a maintenance headache. In the tests for the "hot dog," it was found that contrary to accepted beliefs, the surge of liquids on the tank-heads in a partially loaded car was less than one which was full. If that was the case, then the need to have a dome was unnecessary - the expansion dome was originally designed to reduce the pressure of a fully loaded car. In 1956, the "hot dog" underwent extensive tests conducted by the AAR and passed with flying colors. It took a bit longer (1961), however, to eliminate the requirement for side running boards. In 1959, UTLX built four 21,700 gallon tanks - almost doubling the maximum capacity of tank cars; in 1960, 30,000 gallons became the maximum. The "Hot Dog" became obsolete in 1961 when UTLX produced the "Compact-30" car a car of equal capacity, but considerably shorter.

The above is paraphrased from pages 344-352 of Carr's ROCKEFELLER'S SECRET WEAPON."

Tim Gilbert