best brass tank car models


Bill Welch <bwelch@...>
 

I feel competent to look at a brass model of a boxcar or reefer and say if
it is a good model or not, and since most significant house cars will be
done eventually I believe either in resin or styrene, I have not purchased
any brass freight cars except for a couple of tanks cars (the Red Caboose
GATX model) and two N&W covered hoppers done by Overland a few years ago.

But tank cars are another matter and although I have educated myself, I am
still unsure when I look at the brass models I see around at the various
shows. I would find it helpful if people could list 5 to 7 of what they
think are the best tank car models that have been done. If you have a
catalog number, so much the better in trying to identify them at shows.

Bill Welch


Tim O'Connor
 

Bill, here are a few good brass tank car models.

Lambert 105BW -- 8000g, acid service, platform
Lambert 103W -- 10000g, single dome, platform

The Lambert cars are well made. There is a photo of the acid car
in the 1961 Car Builder Cyc. They are not as highly detailed with
regard to brake gear as we demand, but otherwise seem accurate.
I have actually seen examples of the 10000 gallon car and am
positive that it is an accurate model for the late 1950's. (The
most recent one I saw was in 1991 in BN company service.)


Overland 3028 -- 11000g, pressure tank, no platform

This was marketed as "LP tank car". I think it is based
on a 1930's prototype, either ACF or Union Tank. Richard
knows, I'm sure!


Overland 3130 -- 8000g, ACF, single dome ( Type 27? )
Overland 3132 -- 8000g, ACF, triple dome
Overland 3133 -- 8000g, ACF, 1 dome, platform
Overland 3134 -- 8000g, ACF, manyway, platform, chlorine

The above came out in the late 1980's and were pretty cheap
compared to prices now. They are highly detailed and well made.
They come in very small boxes so you have to look carefully!
One set good for the chlorine car was Champ's Dow HT-72. The
triple domes are rare.


Overland 3229 -- 10000g, GACC, 1 dome, no platform

Another good model, these have a large-ish dome and some were
decorated for asphalt service. I think Richard H. has vouched
for the accuracy of them for some California refinery. I have
seen similar cars of other owners and mine is decorated with
Champ's Cities Service decals, for asphalt service of course.


Overland 3231 -- 10000g, X-3

This model needs some minor corrections to be as accurate as
Martin's model. I started working on mine when we were all doing
the Virtual Modeler X-3 -- e.g. I reworked the brake components
from KC to AB spec. However now it sits forlorn in storage...


Overland 3270 -- 8000g, GACC, 1 dome, insulated, platform
Overland 3271 -- 8000g, GACC, 3 dome, insulated, rebuild

Besides being wonderful looking models, I love the #3270 because
it has open grid running boards. Very unusual for a model tank
car even in brass. The 3 dome car has different size domes, and
that is why I assume it represents a rebuild. (IIRC.)


Overland 3361 -- 16000g, 103W, 1 dome

These late 1950's cars were bought by UP, CGW, and other roads.
It was marketed as a UP O-70-1 but I think it can be painted for
other owners. I forget who built the prototype cars, but probably
it was ACF.


W&R -- 1, 2, 3 domes, Pressed Steel Car, KC brakes, high walkways
W&R -- 8000g, 1 dome, Pressed Steel Car, AB brakes, modernized
W&R -- 8000g, 4 dome, Pressed Steel Car, AB brakes, modernized

The W&R tank cars are beautiful models. I only got the modernized
cars to paint for Northern Pacific company service, for which they
are correct. The high walkway cars were unpopular for some reason,
and were easy to find for a long time at train shows.


I didn't list the Precision Scale models, of which there were
several. They are not up to your modeling standards. Also I did
not list railroad specific cars such as Pecos River Brass did
for AT&SF and SP.

I feel competent to look at a brass model of a boxcar or reefer and say if
it is a good model or not, and since most significant house cars will be
done eventually I believe either in resin or styrene, I have not purchased
any brass freight cars except for a couple of tanks cars (the Red Caboose
GATX model) and two N&W covered hoppers done by Overland a few years ago.

But tank cars are another matter and although I have educated myself, I am
still unsure when I look at the brass models I see around at the various
shows. I would find it helpful if people could list 5 to 7 of what they
think are the best tank car models that have been done. If you have a
catalog number, so much the better in trying to identify them at shows.

Bill Welch


Richard Hendrickson
 

Tim O'Connor's list of brass tank cars is, in general, a good one, so I'll
save some time by adding my comments to his.

Lambert 105BW -- 8000g, acid service, platform
Lambert 103W -- 10000g, single dome, platform
I can't judge their accuracy, as their prototypes were later than the
period to which I usually confine my research (and probably too late to be
of interest to brother Welch, though certainly of interest to others on the
list).

Overland 3028 -- 11000g, pressure tank, no platform

This was marketed as "LP tank car". I think it is based
on a 1930's prototype, either ACF or Union Tank. Richard
knows, I'm sure!
It models a 10.500 gal. Phillips Petroleum ICC-105 LPG prototype dating, as
Tim says, from the 1930s. A nice model and, currently, the only correct
model of the slightly smaller ICC-105s that preceded the cars modeled in HO
by Atlas.
I don't have one and wish I did.

Overland 3130 -- 8000g, ACF, single dome ( Type 27? )
Overland 3132 -- 8000g, ACF, triple dome
Overland 3133 -- 8000g, ACF, 1 dome, platform
Overland 3134 -- 8000g, ACF, manyway, platform, chlorine

The above came out in the late 1980's and were pretty cheap
compared to prices now. They are highly detailed and well made.
They come in very small boxes so you have to look carefully!
One set good for the chlorine car was Champ's Dow HT-72. The
triple domes are rare.
Yes, these were supposed to model Type 27s, and Tim is right, the triple
dome 8K gal. prototypes were quite rare - and 8K gal.high pressure chlorine
cars were, AFAIK, non-existent. After deciding to model a standard ICC-103
tank car, Tom Marsh had the not-so-brilliant idea of using the same tooling
to produce other types of cars with tanks of the same size, despite the
fact that those types were seldom, if ever, produced with 8K gal. tanks.
There's also another problem; the tanks scale out much closer to 10K than
to 8K gal. Set one alongside an InterMountain 8K gal. Type 27 and you'll
see the difference in tank diameter immediately. I used one of these to
model a 10K gal. Texaco car and was well pleased with the results - but
since IM does both 8K and 10K Type 27s in plastic, I'm not inclined to
repeat that exercise. In short - they're nice models but only the single
dome car had an actual prototype, and that prototype can now be well
modeled for a lot less $$.

Overland 3229 -- 10000g, GACC, 1 dome, no platform

Another good model, these have a large-ish dome and some were
decorated for asphalt service. I think Richard H. has vouched
for the accuracy of them for some California refinery. I have
seen similar cars of other owners and mine is decorated with
Champ's Cities Service decals, for asphalt service of course.
The prototype (for which I provided photos and data) was a GATX car
assigned to Western Asphalt, but 10K gal. insulated cars of this desing
were fairly common, and the model is, as Tim observes, very well done.

Overland 3231 -- 10000g, X-3

This model needs some minor corrections to be as accurate as
Martin's model. I started working on mine when we were all doing
the Virtual Modeler X-3 -- e.g. I reworked the brake components
from KC to AB spec. However now it sits forlorn in storage...
This is actually a pretty good model of the later X-3s built for UTL ca.
1930, which were somewhat different from the earlier X-3s modeled by
Sunshine. However, it was based on Mainline Modeler drawings by Bob
Hundman which were, shall we say, confused about the prototype, hence the
nedd for some minor corrections. The main problem that resulted from
Hundman's confusion was the Andrews trucks on the model, which were not
used on the later X-3s, though replacing the trucks is, of course, no big
deal (use Accurail AAR trucks with spring planks). (Plastic trucks on a
brass model? You bet, if you actually want to run it. Most of the trucks
that come on brass models roll so reluctantly that they're suitable only
for use as fishing sinkers, even if they're prototypically correct - and
often they're not.)

Overland 3270 -- 8000g, GACC, 1 dome, insulated, platform
Overland 3271 -- 8000g, GACC, 3 dome, insulated, rebuild

Besides being wonderful looking models, I love the #3270 because
it has open grid running boards. Very unusual for a model tank
car even in brass. The 3 dome car has different size domes, and
that is why I assume it represents a rebuild. (IIRC.)
The single dome car represents a fairly common GATC Type 30 prototype. The
prototype for the 3 dome model was, as Tim says, a rebuild, as indicated by
the fact that the center dome was larger than the others, and in fact was a
glass lined wine tank car (for which, again, I provided the prototype data
and photos).

Overland 3361 -- 16000g, 103W, 1 dome

These late 1950's cars were bought by UP, CGW, and other roads.
It was marketed as a UP O-70-1 but I think it can be painted for
other owners. I forget who built the prototype cars, but probably
it was ACF.
Correct. NP had them, CB&Q had them, and there were other owners as well,
but these cars were all railroad owened and were designed for, and (with
hardly any exceptions) used in, diesel fuel service. So the model is only
useful if you model the late 1950s (as Bill W. and I do not) and your
prototype RR happened to own them.

W&R -- 1, 2, 3 domes, Pressed Steel Car, KC brakes, high walkways
W&R -- 8000g, 1 dome, Pressed Steel Car, AB brakes, modernized
W&R -- 8000g, 4 dome, Pressed Steel Car, AB brakes, modernized

The W&R tank cars are beautiful models....The high walkway cars were
unpopular >for some reason, and were easy to find for a long time at train
shows.
Tim is right, these are excellent models, though the prototypes were built
mostly by AC&F, not Pressed Steel (W&R's advertising was confusing about
this). The prototypes for the 1, 2, and 3 dome high walkway cars were AC&F
Type 4s, built from 1904 to ca. 1912 in large numbers. The models were
probably a drug on the market because modelers didn't realize how long
these critters lasted; I have photos of them still in revenue service in
the 1960s. The 2 and 3 dome cars were relatively rare, but the 8K and 10K
gal. single dome cars were very common.

Tim doesn't mention the Red Caboose/W.R. Drake 8,000 gal. GATC tank car
models because Bill indicated that he already had a couple of those, but
others on the list might still find a dealer with new ones, as well as
second-hand models at swap meets and such. Unfortunately, they sit too
high on the trucks, and correcting the bolster height ain't easy. However,
they're very well done in all other respects, and all factory P/L schemes
are correct (I know, because I provided the data and photos for them).

Other brass tank car models worth mentioning are the "Pennsylvania RR TM-8"
brass cars imported some years ago by Sunset. Though a bit on the crude
side, they were reasonably priced and, because neither Mort Mann nor the
SPFs who pursuaded him to import the models knew zilch about the
prototypes, the fact that they actually represented 8K gallon AC&F Type
11s, built by the thousands from 1911 to 1917, was a well kept secret.
When they didn't sell as PRR cars, Mort put a bunch of bogus colorful paint
jobs on them and peddled them at fire sale prices instead of painting and
lettering them for any of the numerous correct prototype schemes. In fact,
they can be correctly painted and lettered for Tidewater Associated,
Barrett Tarvia, Gulf Refining, Interstate Tank Car, Kendall Refining, Keith
Tank Line, Mobilgas, Mid-Continent D-X, National Oil Co., Sinclair, etc.,
etc. The only problem is finding suitable decal lettering - but that's a
problem with brass tank car models in general, unless they're factory
painted and lettered.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


Ted Culotta <tculotta@...>
 

Tim and Richard did not mention Overland #3230 which is a GATC 10k insulated two compartment car. It certainly looks good, but I still have to do some research on prototypes. Anyone know about this one?

Regards,
Ted Culotta


Richard Hendrickson
 

Tim and Richard did not mention Overland #3230 which is a GATC 10k
insulated two compartment car. It certainly looks good, but I still
have to do some research on prototypes. Anyone know about this one?
Ted, the prototype for this model was a car that Tom Marsh found intact but
out of service in the Chicago area. Its last owner had been a private
shipper (a chemical co., IIRC) which didn't exist during the era this list
covers, so the car was obviously second-hand. I've never seen a photo of a
car of this design in revenue service. 10,000 gal. two-compartment tank
cars were extremely rare, whether insulated or not.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


Tim O'Connor
 

Tim and Richard did not mention Overland #3230 which is a GATC 10k
insulated two compartment car. It certainly looks good, but I still
have to do some research on prototypes. Anyone know about this one?

Regards,
Ted Culotta

You got a picture of the model? I think I have seen a photo or
three of two dome insulated tank cars of the steam era...


Richard Hendrickson
 

From Ted Culotta:

Tim and Richard did not mention Overland #3230 which is a GATC 10k
insulated two compartment car. It certainly looks good, but I still
have to do some research on prototypes. Anyone know about this one?
From Tim:

You got a picture of the model? I think I have seen a photo or
three of two dome insulated tank cars of the steam era...
So have I, Tim, but none of them are 10K gallon cars. 6K and 8K, yes,
though not very common. But the prototype for Overland #3230 may have been
unique.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


aschumannca <armin@...>
 

This thread got me wondering about an old brass tank car I've got
laying around. Anyone have any info (pro or con) about a three dome,
riveted tank car sold by Gem and made by Tokaido. I picked it up at
a flea market, minus trucks and box, quite a few years ago.

Armin Schumann
London, Ontario


Richard Hendrickson
 

Armin Schuman writes:

This thread got me wondering about an old brass tank car I've got
laying around. Anyone have any info (pro or con) about a three dome,
riveted tank car sold by Gem and made by Tokaido. I picked it up at
a flea market, minus trucks and box, quite a few years ago.
I have only the vaguest remembrance of those models, but IIRC they were
like brass versions of Athearn's triple dome plastic tank car - that is,
the tanks were way too large, most three compartIent cars being of 6K gal.
capacity and only a small number as large as 8K. (in those days, brass
importers paid little attention to prototype authenticity.) But I could be
wrong. If you could post a photo (you might even be able to make a scan
directly from the model), plus measurements of the tank length and diameter
and length o/a of the underframe, I might be able to point you in the
direction of a prototype for it.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


aschumannca <armin@...>
 

If you could post a photo (you might even be able to make a scan
directly from the model), plus measurements of the tank length and
diameter
and length o/a of the underframe, I might be able to point you in
the
direction of a prototype for it.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520
Richard, I posted 3 scans of the model in the Gem Models folder.
I measued the model, as follows;

overall frame length 41'-3"
overall frame width at bolsters 9'-9"

overall tank length 38'
overall tank diameter 7'-9" (93")

dome diameters 63"
dome heights at center from tank top 18"

bolster centerlines 31'-3"
bolster enterlines from frame ends 5'-0"
bolster centerlines to cross member centerlines 10'-3"
cross member centerlines 10'-9"

Armin Schumann
London, Ontario


Richard Hendrickson
 

From Armin Schumann:

Richard, I posted 3 scans of the model in the Gem Models folder.
I measued the model, as follows;

overall frame length 41'-3"
overall frame width at bolsters 9'-9"

overall tank length 38'
overall tank diameter 7'-9" (93")

dome diameters 63"
dome heights at center from tank top 18"

bolster centerlines 31'-3"
bolster enterlines from frame ends 5'-0"
bolster centerlines to cross member centerlines 10'-3"
cross member centerlines 10'-9"
Yep, that's what I thought. The dimensions are approximately those of a
12,500 gallon tank, same as the Athearn plastic model. And to the best of
my knowledge, there were NO multiple compartment tank cars that large. So
the bad news is that both the brass model and Athearn's plastic three
compartment tank car model are bogus. Sorry to be the bearer of bad
tidings....

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


Andy Carlson
 

--- Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@opendoor.com>
wrote:

Yep, that's what I thought. The dimensions are
approximately those of a
12,500 gallon tank, same as the Athearn plastic
model. And to the best of
my knowledge, there were NO multiple compartment
tank cars that large. So
the bad news is that both the brass model and
Athearn's plastic three
compartment tank car model are bogus. Sorry to be
the bearer of bad
tidings....
Don't give up hope. Place some S scale trucks, and
market it as an S scale muliple compartment tankcar.
I am not going to sign this...
Ojai CA


Jon Miller <atsf@...>
 

But I could be
wrong<
Nope, you are right -- it's an Athearn copy.

Jon Miller
AT&SF
For me time has stopped in 1941
Digitrax, Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI user
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


aschumannca <armin@...>
 

Sorry to be the bearer of bad
tidings....

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520
Hey, no problem....on my fictional model railroad, no one will know
the difference.

Armin Schumann
London, Ontario


John Oseida <XSEInc@...>
 

I found the recent discussion of brass tank cars quite interesting but
was curious about a model that was absent from the list. Overland also
produced a 4,000 tank car in HO scale described on the box as 'N/A
Two-Dome Tank Car (4,000 Gal. #18902 Nice & Timy)', the Overland number
is 3123. Would anyone care to comment on the accuracy of this
particular car?

John Oseida
Oakville, ON


Richard Hendrickson wrote:

Tim O'Connor's list of brass tank cars is, in general, a good one, so I'll
save some time by adding my comments to his.

Lambert 105BW -- 8000g, acid service, platform
Lambert 103W -- 10000g, single dome, platform
I can't judge their accuracy, as their prototypes were later than the
period to which I usually confine my research (and probably too late to be
of interest to brother Welch, though certainly of interest to others
on the
list).

Overland 3028 -- 11000g, pressure tank, no platform

This was marketed as "LP tank car". I think it is based
on a 1930's prototype, either ACF or Union Tank. Richard
knows, I'm sure!
It models a 10.500 gal. Phillips Petroleum ICC-105 LPG prototype
dating, as
Tim says, from the 1930s. A nice model and, currently, the only correct
model of the slightly smaller ICC-105s that preceded the cars modeled
in HO
by Atlas.
I don't have one and wish I did.

Overland 3130 -- 8000g, ACF, single dome ( Type 27? )
Overland 3132 -- 8000g, ACF, triple dome
Overland 3133 -- 8000g, ACF, 1 dome, platform
Overland 3134 -- 8000g, ACF, manyway, platform, chlorine

The above came out in the late 1980's and were pretty cheap
compared to prices now. They are highly detailed and well made.
They come in very small boxes so you have to look carefully!
One set good for the chlorine car was Champ's Dow HT-72. The
triple domes are rare.
Yes, these were supposed to model Type 27s, and Tim is right, the triple
dome 8K gal. prototypes were quite rare - and 8K gal.high pressure
chlorine
cars were, AFAIK, non-existent. After deciding to model a standard
ICC-103
tank car, Tom Marsh had the not-so-brilliant idea of using the same
tooling
to produce other types of cars with tanks of the same size, despite the
fact that those types were seldom, if ever, produced with 8K gal. tanks.
There's also another problem; the tanks scale out much closer to 10K than
to 8K gal. Set one alongside an InterMountain 8K gal. Type 27 and you'll
see the difference in tank diameter immediately. I used one of these to
model a 10K gal. Texaco car and was well pleased with the results - but
since IM does both 8K and 10K Type 27s in plastic, I'm not inclined to
repeat that exercise. In short - they're nice models but only the single
dome car had an actual prototype, and that prototype can now be well
modeled for a lot less $$.

Overland 3229 -- 10000g, GACC, 1 dome, no platform

Another good model, these have a large-ish dome and some were
decorated for asphalt service. I think Richard H. has vouched
for the accuracy of them for some California refinery. I have
seen similar cars of other owners and mine is decorated with
Champ's Cities Service decals, for asphalt service of course.
The prototype (for which I provided photos and data) was a GATX car
assigned to Western Asphalt, but 10K gal. insulated cars of this desing
were fairly common, and the model is, as Tim observes, very well done.

Overland 3231 -- 10000g, X-3

This model needs some minor corrections to be as accurate as
Martin's model. I started working on mine when we were all doing
the Virtual Modeler X-3 -- e.g. I reworked the brake components
from KC to AB spec. However now it sits forlorn in storage...
This is actually a pretty good model of the later X-3s built for UTL ca.
1930, which were somewhat different from the earlier X-3s modeled by
Sunshine. However, it was based on Mainline Modeler drawings by Bob
Hundman which were, shall we say, confused about the prototype, hence the
nedd for some minor corrections. The main problem that resulted from
Hundman's confusion was the Andrews trucks on the model, which were not
used on the later X-3s, though replacing the trucks is, of course, no big
deal (use Accurail AAR trucks with spring planks). (Plastic trucks on a
brass model? You bet, if you actually want to run it. Most of the trucks
that come on brass models roll so reluctantly that they're suitable only
for use as fishing sinkers, even if they're prototypically correct - and
often they're not.)

Overland 3270 -- 8000g, GACC, 1 dome, insulated, platform
Overland 3271 -- 8000g, GACC, 3 dome, insulated, rebuild

Besides being wonderful looking models, I love the #3270 because
it has open grid running boards. Very unusual for a model tank
car even in brass. The 3 dome car has different size domes, and
that is why I assume it represents a rebuild. (IIRC.)
The single dome car represents a fairly common GATC Type 30
prototype. The
prototype for the 3 dome model was, as Tim says, a rebuild, as
indicated by
the fact that the center dome was larger than the others, and in fact
was a
glass lined wine tank car (for which, again, I provided the prototype data
and photos).

Overland 3361 -- 16000g, 103W, 1 dome

These late 1950's cars were bought by UP, CGW, and other roads.
It was marketed as a UP O-70-1 but I think it can be painted for
other owners. I forget who built the prototype cars, but probably
it was ACF.
Correct. NP had them, CB&Q had them, and there were other owners as well,
but these cars were all railroad owened and were designed for, and (with
hardly any exceptions) used in, diesel fuel service. So the model is only
useful if you model the late 1950s (as Bill W. and I do not) and your
prototype RR happened to own them.

W&R -- 1, 2, 3 domes, Pressed Steel Car, KC brakes, high walkways
W&R -- 8000g, 1 dome, Pressed Steel Car, AB brakes, modernized
W&R -- 8000g, 4 dome, Pressed Steel Car, AB brakes, modernized

The W&R tank cars are beautiful models....The high walkway cars were
unpopular >for some reason, and were easy to find for a long time at
train
shows.
Tim is right, these are excellent models, though the prototypes were built
mostly by AC&F, not Pressed Steel (W&R's advertising was confusing about
this). The prototypes for the 1, 2, and 3 dome high walkway cars were
AC&F
Type 4s, built from 1904 to ca. 1912 in large numbers. The models were
probably a drug on the market because modelers didn't realize how long
these critters lasted; I have photos of them still in revenue service in
the 1960s. The 2 and 3 dome cars were relatively rare, but the 8K and 10K
gal. single dome cars were very common.

Tim doesn't mention the Red Caboose/W.R. Drake 8,000 gal. GATC tank car
models because Bill indicated that he already had a couple of those, but
others on the list might still find a dealer with new ones, as well as
second-hand models at swap meets and such. Unfortunately, they sit too
high on the trucks, and correcting the bolster height ain't easy.
However,
they're very well done in all other respects, and all factory P/L schemes
are correct (I know, because I provided the data and photos for them).

Other brass tank car models worth mentioning are the "Pennsylvania RR
TM-8"
brass cars imported some years ago by Sunset. Though a bit on the crude
side, they were reasonably priced and, because neither Mort Mann nor the
SPFs who pursuaded him to import the models knew zilch about the
prototypes, the fact that they actually represented 8K gallon AC&F Type
11s, built by the thousands from 1911 to 1917, was a well kept secret.
When they didn't sell as PRR cars, Mort put a bunch of bogus colorful
paint
jobs on them and peddled them at fire sale prices instead of painting and
lettering them for any of the numerous correct prototype schemes. In
fact,
they can be correctly painted and lettered for Tidewater Associated,
Barrett Tarvia, Gulf Refining, Interstate Tank Car, Kendall Refining,
Keith
Tank Line, Mobilgas, Mid-Continent D-X, National Oil Co., Sinclair, etc.,
etc. The only problem is finding suitable decal lettering - but that's a
problem with brass tank car models in general, unless they're factory
painted and lettered.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520



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Richard Hendrickson
 

I found the recent discussion of brass tank cars quite interesting but
was curious about a model that was absent from the list. Overland also
produced a 4,000 tank car in HO scale described on the box as 'N/A
Two-Dome Tank Car (4,000 Gal. #18902 Nice & Timy)', the Overland number
is 3123. Would anyone care to comment on the accuracy of this
particular car?

John Oseida
Oakville, ON
The reason I ignored that model is that the prototype was a welded car
built in the 1960s, after the era covered by this list. IIRC it was based
on drawings in one of the magazines and is probably an accurate model of a
VERY odd-ball prototype, but too modern to be of interest here.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


Tim O'Connor
 

Much too modern for this list, John. Overland has produced
other modern tank cars too.

I found the recent discussion of brass tank cars quite interesting but
was curious about a model that was absent from the list. Overland also
produced a 4,000 tank car in HO scale described on the box as 'N/A
Two-Dome Tank Car (4,000 Gal. #18902 Nice & Timy)', the Overland number
is 3123. Would anyone care to comment on the accuracy of this
particular car?

John Oseida
Oakville, ON