Hazardous Material Placards


Larry Fink
 

I attended a NMRA clinic last week on proper car placement in trains
when the question came up, "When did railroads start applying
hazardous material placards?" No one knew the answer, but does
anyone in the group know? I'm particularly interested in those tank
car kits that come with diamond-shaped placards and holders,
operating on a 1948-era model railroad.


Richard Hendrickson
 

I attended a NMRA clinic last week on proper car placement in trains
when the question came up, "When did railroads start applying
hazardous material placards?" No one knew the answer, but does
anyone in the group know? I'm particularly interested in those tank
car kits that come with diamond-shaped placards and holders,
operating on a 1948-era model railroad.
The use of hazardous materials placards dates back at least to the WWI era,
and they were certainly required ca. 1948. Some years ago Microscale
produced a comprehensive and accurate set of decals for '40s through '70s
placards, set #87-975 which is still cataloged. It includes placards for
corrosives, explosives, etc. as well as the more common inflammable
placards for tank cars, and is the only place I know to get the "half
placards" (with one half blacked out) which were used on empty tank cars
that still contained hazardous vapors.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


Mark P.
 

To back up what Richard said, I have an "explosives" placard for the Zanesville & Western (Toledo & Ohio Central subsidiary which was a NYC Lines subsidiary). I was told this card was from before 1918, which is in line with the Z&W corporate history.

Mark Plank

----- Original Message -----

I attended a NMRA clinic last week on proper car placement in trains
when the question came up, "When did railroads start applying
hazardous material placards?"
The use of hazardous materials placards dates back at least to the WWI era,
and they were certainly required ca. 1948.
--
___________________________________________________________
Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com
http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm


Jacque Burgess <jacque@...>
 

I have one for explosives dated 192__ (fill in the date) so the shortline
Yosemite Valley Railroad was printing them up by the 1920s for use on box
cars. Mine is 12"H by 14"W. I have a photo of the end of a YV car at a gold
mine siding with one of these cards nailed high on the end of the car. The
card explains rules about the handling of this car (which was most likely
carrying dynamite) in train service. Since the YV box cars didn't move
off-line, the car had to be loaded in Merced and didn't travel over the SP
or AT&SF.

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com

----- Original Message -----

I attended a NMRA clinic last week on proper car placement in trains when
the question came up, "When did railroads start applying hazardous material
placards?"


Bruce Smith <smithbf@...>
 

On Jul 18, 2004, at 3:21 PM, Richard Hendrickson wrote:
The use of hazardous materials placards dates back at least to the WWI era,
and they were certainly required ca. 1948. Some years ago Microscale
produced a comprehensive and accurate set of decals for '40s through '70s
placards, set #87-975 which is still cataloged. It includes placards for
corrosives, explosives, etc. as well as the more common inflammable
placards for tank cars, and is the only place I know to get the "half
placards" (with one half blacked out) which were used on empty tank cars
that still contained hazardous vapors.
Richard, or anyone else for that matter,

Do you have any suggestions for using these on models? I have a few sets and I am concerned that if I use them as decals, they will snug down onto the model and look like they were painted on, when what I want is that cardboard look... I tried copying one set to paper, but the backing MicroScale uses ingeniously foiled that attempt.

Regards
Bruce


Bruce F. Smith V.M.D., Ph.D.
Scott-Ritchey Research Center
334-844-5587, 334-844-5850 (fax)
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" - Benjamin Franklin
__
/ &#92;
__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________
|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |
| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||
|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|
| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0


Shawn Beckert
 

Bruce Smith asked:

Do you have any suggestions for using these on models?
I have a few sets and I am concerned that if I use them
as decals, they will snug down onto the model and look
like they were painted on, when what I want is that
cardboard look...
Bruce,

I've given this some thought myself. The problem with H.O.
placards, as supplied by at least two of the manufacturers,
is they are molded as if they were empty, with no placard
installed. Most of us aren't going to leave them that way,
but as you point out any decal is going to conform itself
to the shape of that styrene part, which won't look right.

What I'm thinking of doing is using the metal placard holders
as supplied in Athearn's tank car kits. These are smooth, and
a decal applied to them will look more like cardboard.

Shawn Beckert


Michael Watnoski
 

Shawn and Bruce,

Would something like the etched brass parts from the
Sunshine X-3 kits work? These were made to fold over the
decal. I made these parts for Sunshine and could make the
more generic style if anyone thought there may be a market.

Michael Watnoski
Free State Systems

"Beckert, Shawn" wrote:

I've given this some thought myself. The problem with H.O.
placards, as supplied by at least two of the manufacturers,
is they are molded as if they were empty, with no placard
installed. Most of us aren't going to leave them that way,
but as you point out any decal is going to conform itself
to the shape of that styrene part, which won't look right.

What I'm thinking of doing is using the metal placard holders
as supplied in Athearn's tank car kits. These are smooth, and
a decal applied to them will look more like cardboard.

Shawn Beckert


Tim O'Connor
 

Excellent diamond shape placards are available from
Plano, in two versions #310 (solid) and #311 (frame).
The frame version is great for Union Tank Car, which
mounted diamond placards onto on a rectangular target.
Just cut the placard decals to make them look like
they are inserted behind the retainer bar. They are
a bit oversize in thickness but are still much thinner
than plastic parts.


Bruce Smith <smithbf@...>
 

On Jul 21, 2004, at 9:58 PM, Michael Watnoski wrote:

Shawn and Bruce,

Would something like the etched brass parts from the
Sunshine X-3 kits work? These were made to fold over the
decal. I made these parts for Sunshine and could make the
more generic style if anyone thought there may be a market.
Michael,

I think that there is definitely a market for "standard" tank car placards, as well as the UTLX style...

However, the decal set we are talking about goes way beyond that to many different placards that would have been tacked to the tack boards of cars... and I'm trying to figure out how to make these look like cardboard, not decals. My latest attempt will be to decal very thin sheet stock.

Happy Rails
Bruce


Bruce F. Smith V.M.D., Ph.D.
Scott-Ritchey Research Center
334-844-5587, 334-844-5850 (fax)
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" - Benjamin Franklin
__
/ &#92;
__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________
|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |
| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||
|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|
| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0


Scott Pitzer
 

Bruce Smith wrote:
"I'm trying to figure out how to make these look like
cardboard, not decals. My latest attempt will be to decal very thin
sheet stock."
===============

"Very thin sheet stock" would be almost the same as leaving the decal on its backing sheet. When I want to represent a similar item-- (post-steam-era) ACI labels, I cut out the label, blacken the light colored paper edges with a marker, and attach it with a drop of ACC.
Scott Pitzer


Michael Watnoski
 

Hi Bruce,

How about just cutting the placard out of the decal sheet
and applying it to the tackboard? Most decal papers are
quite thin and stiff and would seem to resemble scale
cardboard.

Michael


Bruce Smith wrote:


On Jul 21, 2004, at 9:58 PM, Michael Watnoski wrote:

Shawn and Bruce,

Would something like the etched brass parts from the
Sunshine X-3 kits work? These were made to fold over the
decal. I made these parts for Sunshine and could make the
more generic style if anyone thought there may be a market.
Michael,

I think that there is definitely a market for "standard" tank car
placards, as well as the UTLX style...

However, the decal set we are talking about goes way beyond that to
many different placards that would have been tacked to the tack boards
of cars... and I'm trying to figure out how to make these look like
cardboard, not decals. My latest attempt will be to decal very thin
sheet stock.

Happy Rails
Bruce