wooden coke cars


CBarkan@...
 

I don't know what they did to avoid the problems Phil alludes to, but among
the early specialized coke cars were those of the BR&P which kind of looked
like large, open-top stock cars (without doors of course). I would guess that
other roads in steel and coal producing regions had similar cars and I have
heard before that stock cars had a dual role transorting coke. The point is that
I guess the stuff must have been sufficiently cooled or quenched so as not to
ignite the car.

Chris

In a message dated 10/16/04 1:47:10 PM, buchwaldfam@... writes:

<< As for a little bit more diversity than even gondolas,

Westerfield's site makes reference to the drop bottom doors on the

MILW's 36 foot stock cars possibly being used to haul coke. I wonder

how well that scheme worked: putting (hot?)coke into a wood car. I can

still picture the dump trucks being loaded with quenched coke from the

coke plant on Milwaukee's southeast side. Those trucks trailed a cloud

of steam as they left the plant, so it couldn't be all THAT cooled

off! Trains Magazine also made mention of a WWII expedient of putting

coke into old wood box cars which have had their roofs cut off.

Regards,

Phil Buchwald >>


Eric Hansmann <ehansmann@...>
 

Mark Plank wrote:

Would these be the same as cars lableled coke racks in early ORERs? These
appeared on the Toledo & Ohio Central, Kanawha & Michigan, and Zanesville &
Western, and I'm sure on other roads as well. The Ohio Central lines had
about 2700 total of these cars. In glancing at the 1905 ORER, they appeared
to vary quite a bit (they were gone by the 1919 ORER I have, or are labeled
and numbered differently):
IL: 31' 5" - 35' 7.5"
IW: 8' 3" - 9' 4"
capacity: 50000 - 80000
========================================



In reviewing some early Western Maryland Railway photos, I've noted several
coke racks which look like gondolas with extended slatted sides and ends. It
makes me wonder if these cars were fitted to suit the demands of the month
or quarter. Unfortunately, the images are not clear enough to discern car
numbers, but they were spotted at or near coke wharves along the WM in West
Virginia.

Eric Hansmann
Morgantown, W. Va.


Richard Hendrickson
 

Phil Buchwald wrote:

...Westerfield's site makes reference to the drop bottom doors on the
MILW's 36 foot stock cars possibly being used to haul coke. I wonder
how well that scheme worked: putting (hot?)coke into a wood car.
From just after the turn of the century until the mid-1920s, the Santa Fe
ordered thousands of new stock cars which had Caswell drop bottom doors and
longitudinal roof hatches for the loading of coke, so that the cars could
earn backhaul revenue instead of being returned to the west empty.
Apparently this was a successful arrangement until coke was largely
replaced as an industrial fuel in the 1930s and '40s. Then beginning in
the late 1930s most of these cars were rebuilt with solid floors and roofs.
Whether the coke was loaded hot I can't say, though it seems unlikely.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


Mark P.
 

I don't know what they did to avoid the problems Phil alludes to, but among
the early specialized coke cars were those of the BR&P which kind of looked
like large, open-top stock cars (without doors of course). I would guess that
other roads in steel and coal producing regions had similar cars and I have
heard before that stock cars had a dual role transorting coke.
Would these be the same as cars lableled coke racks in early ORERs? These appeared on the Toledo & Ohio Central, Kanawha & Michigan, and Zanesville & Western, and I'm sure on other roads as well. The Ohio Central lines had about 2700 total of these cars. In glancing at the 1905 ORER, they appeared to vary quite a bit (they were gone by the 1919 ORER I have, or are labeled and numbered differently):
IL: 31' 5" - 35' 7.5"
IW: 8' 3" - 9' 4"
capacity: 50000 - 80000

Mark Plank
--
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Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com
http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm


Gatwood, Elden -- Tt, Inc. <elden.gatwood@...>
 

Phil and Chris;
This "last gasp" assignment of wooden cars to coke service was not without
consequence. We've all heard those fire stories. I was wondering if either
of you had seen that photo in the Rock Island color guide of the wooden car
loaded with coke that has burned down to the steel parts? It had been
pushed off onto a siding, and is still smoking in the photo. It is a GREAT
photo, or a rarely photographed subject.

Elden

P.S. Those de-roofed USRA cars the PRR had in coke service (ex: GTc26)
lasted into the 60's!

-----Original Message-----
From: CBarkan@... [mailto:CBarkan@...]
Sent: Sunday, October 17, 2004 4:05 AM
To: buchwaldfam@...; STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] wooden coke cars

I don't know what they did to avoid the problems Phil alludes to, but among
the early specialized coke cars were those of the BR&P which kind of looked
like large, open-top stock cars (without doors of course). I would guess
that
other roads in steel and coal producing regions had similar cars and I have

heard before that stock cars had a dual role transorting coke. The point is
that
I guess the stuff must have been sufficiently cooled or quenched so as not
to
ignite the car.

Chris


In a message dated 10/16/04 1:47:10 PM, buchwaldfam@... writes:

<< As for a little bit more diversity than even gondolas,

Westerfield's site makes reference to the drop bottom doors on the

MILW's 36 foot stock cars possibly being used to haul coke. I wonder

how well that scheme worked: putting (hot?)coke into a wood car. I can

still picture the dump trucks being loaded with quenched coke from the

coke plant on Milwaukee's southeast side. Those trucks trailed a cloud

of steam as they left the plant, so it couldn't be all THAT cooled

off! Trains Magazine also made mention of a WWII expedient of putting

coke into old wood box cars which have had their roofs cut off.

Regards,

Phil Buchwald >>





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buchwaldfam <buchwaldfam@...>
 

Hmmm.... Maybe build up a basic car out of wood and burn it down
a bit. Put a smoke unit in the pile of coke and let it smoke during a
session!

Besides the fire hazard, how did they keep the coke from falling
out between the slats on a stock car?

Best regards,
Phil Buchwald

--- In STMFC@..., "Gatwood, Elden -- Tt, Inc."
<elden.gatwood@t...> wrote:
Phil and Chris;
This "last gasp" assignment of wooden cars to coke service was not
without
consequence. We've all heard those fire stories. I was wondering
if either
of you had seen that photo in the Rock Island color guide of the
wooden car
loaded with coke that has burned down to the steel parts? It had
been
pushed off onto a siding, and is still smoking in the photo. It is
a GREAT
photo, or a rarely photographed subject.

Elden

P.S. Those de-roofed USRA cars the PRR had in coke service (ex:
GTc26)
lasted into the 60's!


Gatwood, Elden -- Tt, Inc. <elden.gatwood@...>
 

Phil;

I like that smoke unit idea!

Some coke was produced (and then screened) to a rather large chunk size for
certain uses, and could be shipped in certain cars without falling through
the slats. Other coke was smaller and had to be shipped with screens in
place. Still smaller coke ("breeze") was shipped in hoppers, to prevent all
of it ending on the tracks.

That idea of partially "burning" a car is one I've been batting around. I
can't get that Rock box out of my mind (what little is left). I've been
thinking of building a car with partial framing and then doing a wooden
floor up and partially burning it before installing it on top of suitably
rusty underframe members. I remember gons that had had the flooring burned
out of them in hot coil service. There were actually more cars like this
than one would think....

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: buchwaldfam [mailto:buchwaldfam@...]
Sent: Monday, October 18, 2004 9:30 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: wooden coke cars


Hmmm.... Maybe build up a basic car out of wood and burn it down
a bit. Put a smoke unit in the pile of coke and let it smoke during a
session!

Besides the fire hazard, how did they keep the coke from falling
out between the slats on a stock car?

Best regards,
Phil Buchwald

--- In STMFC@..., "Gatwood, Elden -- Tt, Inc."
<elden.gatwood@t...> wrote:
Phil and Chris;
This "last gasp" assignment of wooden cars to coke service was not
without
consequence. We've all heard those fire stories. I was wondering
if either
of you had seen that photo in the Rock Island color guide of the
wooden car
loaded with coke that has burned down to the steel parts? It had
been
pushed off onto a siding, and is still smoking in the photo. It is
a GREAT
photo, or a rarely photographed subject.

Elden

P.S. Those de-roofed USRA cars the PRR had in coke service (ex:
GTc26)
lasted into the 60's!







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