What the pics and papers show????


Marty McGuirk <mac@...>
 

Jeff,

It is facsinating if not a bit mind numbing...
I have 50 or so of these lists, and have been compiling freight car
information from photos (I have close to 3,000 pics of the CV taken
between 1945 and 1958) -- all with the purpose of creating a "to-do"
list of freight car modeling projects.


 
I am up to September 23rd.  Have noticed some interesting traffic
"pass by".  One of the steamers going to St Albans - it may have been
retired. 
Either retired or a Southern Division engine going to St Albans for a
inspection/repair New London wasn't capable of handling. What's the
number?

Also noticed two of the alco switchers in the middle of a freight
going to St Albans .
This was quite common. The switchers were rotated from New London and
White River Junction up to St Albans in the wayfreight. In an old issue
of the Ambassador Jack Swanberg had a photo he took in '55 or '56
called "Tail Wags Dog" -- it shows the Alco S-2s in the northbound
wayfreight behind an N-5a.

 
One thing I have noticed a big lack of is CV BOXCARS!  Where were they
all? 
Most were on the GTW. They really didn't spend a lot of time on the
home road, but I have seen enough of them on the CV to know they're
appropriate -- three in a 90 car train sounds about right!


The most I think I have seen was three in a 90 car train.  Can't wait
to get it all in and processed by road to get percentages!   Some
surprises for me: SOU, L&N, IC,  RI and MILW appear far more than I
would have thought. 
I'm not shocked at all. The cars from the Southeast roads may have been
hauling material up north for the various textile mills -- or furniture
in the case of the Southern cars. Photos show most of these to be
40-foot Southern cars with 8- (and later) 10-foot doors. I also know
they were delivered to the freight house in New London regularly with
furniture for several retailers in the area. Milwaukee rib side cars
(again, looking at photo evidence, not documentary evidence) show up
regularly. I've never seen a B&O wagon top box -- lots of B&O hoppers
and but no boxes.

Cars from Midwestern roads were quite common -- remember the CV was
part of a freight route from the Pacific Northwest through Chicago and
ending up in New London. I've also noticed one PRR car seems to show up
in just about every train -- meaning the old Pennsy modelers' mantra
about us all being Pennsy modelers, while annoying and depressing, is
apparently quite true . . . . (that was a joke, Ben !. . . )


Things that have not appeared: RUTLAND (1 car in 3600 so far), BAR (I
can't remember if I've seen any).  Coal loads on the way to Montreal
seem quite varied.
Rutland is odd since it's, well, odd that one car would show up. Which
Rutland car is it? BAR is a tough one -- I was thrilled when I came
across a pic of a red white and blue box in a Southern Division
wayfreight. Maybe it's too Lionel like, but what self-respecting model
railroad doesn't need a "State of Maine" box?

Coal loads apparently came and went from everywhere. The L&N coal gon
is a must-build project for me now, as is a Monon two-bay, which can be
seen in one of the photos of the CV Color Book from Morning Side.

Marty


Dennis Rockwell <dennis@...>
 

On 19 Oct, Marty McGuirk wrote:

[ ... ] I've also noticed one PRR car seems to show up
in just about every train -- meaning the old Pennsy modelers' mantra
about us all being Pennsy modelers, while annoying and depressing, is
apparently quite true . . . . (that was a joke, Ben !. . . )
I *am* a Pennsy modeller, and what I see in period videos is
that the converse is also true: if you're a Pennsy modeller,
you model all the other railroads!

In the "easy to spot" case, every freight train has at least
one NP boxcar!

Rutland is odd since it's, well, odd that one car would show up. Which
Rutland car is it? BAR is a tough one -- I was thrilled when I came
across a pic of a red white and blue box in a Southern Division
wayfreight. Maybe it's too Lionel like, but what self-respecting model
railroad doesn't need a "State of Maine" box?
Mine certainly does! Several of the trains in the freight
schedules I'm going to be running have a block listed
specifically for Maine potatoes, so thanks for the N Scale
40' and 50' "State of Maine" cars, and the BAR reefers!

Dennis Rockwell SPF(N) dennis@... Cambridge MA

Modelling the PRR Wilkes-Barre branch in 1954.


Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Dennis Rockwell...apparently not an old hand on the STMFC...writes about Pennsy trains:


"In the "easy to spot" case, every freight train has at least
one NP boxcar!"
Ah ha! Brock's fifth...or was it the sixth?...rule of frt cars established about 4 yrs ago or so. "In every merchandise frt train of over ten cars there shall be at least one NP box car." It is good to see that Pennsy is not in violation.

Mike Brock


Richard Hendrickson
 

I know of at least one example NP freight train over 10 cars, where
the box cars are PRR, and there are no NP box cars at all...

Tim "Bursting Bubbles" O'Connor

P.S. RED SOX STILL RULE!!!!!!!
Now, now, calm down, Tim. Take a tranquilizer and call us in the morning.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


asychis@...
 

In a message dated 10/21/2004 2:54:45 PM Central Standard Time,
mac@... writes:
I have no idea where Vermont potatoes came from.
I do, Vermont! IN the 1940s, Maine exported less than 1% of its production
of table and seed potatoes to Vermont.

Jerry Michels


Tim O'Connor
 

Ah ha! Brock's fifth...or was it the sixth?...rule of frt cars established about 4 yrs ago or so. "In every merchandise frt train of over ten cars there shall be at least one NP box car." It is good to see that Pennsy is not in violation.
I know of at least one example NP freight train over 10 cars, where
the box cars are PRR, and there are no NP box cars at all...

Tim "Bursting Bubbles" O'Connor

P.S. RED SOX STILL RULE!!!!!!!


Marty McGuirk <mac@...>
 

On Tuesday, October 19, 2004, at 05:59 PM, Jeff Lodge wrote:

The steamer is 452 on the 211 behind engine 1859 - date is 9/18/55. 
It is the last "car" on the train according to the list.
My Locomotive status dated November 15, 1954 shows 452 as "St Albans,
awaiting shop" -- I know she was shopped at least this time and
returned to service for almost 2 years before retirement.

 
The diesels were 8080 and 8081 on the 429, on 9/20/55.  Engines
9401/9404 were in charge.
The diesels were Alco switcher (S-4s) that were liklely heading to St
Albans for a rotation. 9401 abd 9404 were, as I'm sure you know, a set
of A-A CN C-Liners -- telling me this was likely freight 491.

Not that I've comleted any analysis, but would it be appropraite to
have some empty CV boxcars in CV yards "waiting" to be called to
action - or were they too busy hauling autos on the GTW?
I plan to have some. Also, one car that may not show up on the
switchlists or consist reports could be the LCL car -- almost all the
Southern Division wayfreights I've seen pics of have a 40000-series CV
boxcar that was used to service the many LCL customers along the route.

 
And another thing!!!!  Where are the 200 CV hoppers.  I can't remember
if I've seen any of them yet.  You would kind of think almost all the
hoppers on the line would be busy stocking up New England coal dealers
in September. 
The CV hoppers were used primarily in company service -- both MofW work
and hauling company coal (fuel) from the two larger facilities (WRJ and
St Albans) to New London, Burlington, and Palmer.

 
The Rutland car is 193, designated as a box with merchandise going
"West" (Not Canada or Montreal.  So I assume when they say West, they
are saying through Canada and back down into the states in/around the
midwest.)
That would be pretty close to my guess.
 
Many of the Southeastern cars seem to be loads going into Canada or
out west.  Was it cheaper for the Southern to ship some stuff way up
here, thorugh Canada and then back into the states? 
Geographically, for instance, Atlanta GA is on the "East Coast", but
it is due south of Columbus Ohio - clearly the midwest.  The CV is
very north and east of the Southern's territory.  Doesn't exactly ring
of "just in time delivery" does it?
No, but this was the era of aggressive railroad sales reps, and some
careful planning of backhaul. Lets look at this example. The rules of
service would require that Southern car to be returned to its home
rails empty under the same route it traveled -- share in the $$$ share
in the overhead -- UNLESS it could be loaded enroute to home as long
as this "by chance" trip didn't take the car out of its way.

Another consideration is the fact that although the trip may be longer
mileage wise than say heading to Chicago via the Southern's central US
connections, the freight agents may have wined and dined the shipper
and given him a great deal to get the business. If the load wasn't time
critical (only in today's age is anything more than a week considered
"way too long") who cares if it took 3 days or 10?

So, that SRR boxcar would carry a load into Canada and then possibly
down into Chicago -- and from there wherever it was going. Then it
would return home by the same route. Along the way it may well get a
load of newsprint, pulp, or whatever in Canada. Maybe the traffic
agents on the SRR knew this -- realizing that there is a better chance
of the car getting captured in Canada with a load -- and therefore more
revenue -- than it would be of getting a load on the CGW or PRR or
whatever.

Remember, the Canadian/US tariff laws also played into this (they
changed almost year to year) but not all CN or CP boxcars would be
eligible to haul freight into the US -- so an empty US road car sitting
available in Montreal is a great steal for the CN traffic agent trying
to find a way to ship a load of Christmas trees down south.

These guys weren't dumb, and they would often arrange car routings to
handle anticipated seasonal or regional traffic. You can bet that the
railroads in the granger belt held onto every 40-foot boxcar that could
be pressed into grain service starting several weeks ahead of the
annual harvest.

Getting back to the import laws from Canada into the US -- on the
equipment, not cargo -- even the CN diesels that pulled CV trains (and
GT/NE trains as well) were subject to strict import tariffs -- there's
even a few instances of CV steamers pulling broken down CN diesels back
across the border to prevent the engines from staying in the country
longer than 72 hours -- the limit at the time -- after that time the
railroad would have been charged an import duty on the locomotive.

These elaborate laws, and others like them, were also the reason the
CV, GT, GTW, and GT/NE all got their own locomotives and remained
"separate" from the CN. Also the reason some CP boxcars carried "IofME"
lettering. This is way to complex -- and not of sufficient interest to
me -- to explain in any further detail -- but knowing about it as an
issue may answer some of the weird stuff you see happening on those
train consists.


 
So far, only two BAR cars - both boxes.  What did Maine have that
Vermont didn't?  BAR hauled paper and/or trees and spuds.  Canada kept
the CV afloat with the paper traffic.  Don't know about how Vermont
got their potatoes, maybe these came from Canada too.
I have no idea where Vermont potatoes came from. I found my one SofMe
car --- so I'm all set!

Marty


Richard Townsend
 

I just ran across a 1958 or 1959 photo taken on the Colorado & Southern in darkest Wyoming. In the space of five cars are a BAR State of Maine box car, a NC&StL "racing stripe" box car, and an orange GN box car. Lionel-like for sure.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon

On 19 Oct, Marty McGuirk wrote:

Rutland is odd since it's, well, odd that one car would show up. Which
Rutland car is it? BAR is a tough one -- I was thrilled when I came
across a pic of a red white and blue box in a Southern Division
wayfreight. Maybe it's too Lionel like, but what self-respecting model
railroad doesn't need a "State of Maine" box?
--



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Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

Marty McGuirk wrote in response to Jeff Lodge's query:

(snip)


One thing I have noticed a big lack of is CV BOXCARS! Where were they
all?
Most were on the GTW. They really didn't spend a lot of time on the
home road, but I have seen enough of them on the CV to know they're
appropriate -- three in a 90 car train sounds about right!
Marty,

CV boxcars could be dispersed all over the country similar to any other
boxcar in the 1945-1955 period. On January 27, 1948, CV boxcar #40002
was carrying whiskey southbound on the SOU between Pot Yard and Monroe
VA. Also, on the same SOU train, was CV #41388 carrying aluminum. On May
28th, 1949, CV boxcar #40177 was carrying merchandise southbound to
Edinburg TX on the T&NO. So far as I know, there were no distilleries or
aluminum smelters on the CV.

But a better example of this dispersion may be the travels of MONON 40'
PS-1 Boxcar #1 between June 16th, 1947 and June 6th, 1948 which traveled
about 28,000 miles of which only about 500 (1.8% of the total) of them
were on the MONON. #1 left Crawfordsville IN with a load of merchandise
for the L&N's Louisville freight house. When the car was unloaded, did
the L&N ship the car back to the MONON?

No, they reloaded it with more merchandise and sent it southward to
Nashville. Eventually, after a few more unloadings/reloadings, #1
arrived in Miami (SAL) from whence it was reloaded and sent north to
Savannah. For a couple of weeks, it yo-yoed in the Carolinas and Georgia
carrying merchandise. Finally on July 20th, 1947, it left Cayce SC with
signal material for Apex NC. On August 7th, it was loaded with lumber at
Sanford NC (SAL) and routed SAL-RF&P-PRR-D&H-NYO&W to Jermyn Transfer PA
where it was unloaded. Not finding a load, did the O&W route it back to
the D&H-PRR-RF&P-SAL?

No, it was delivered to the DL&W for a direct delivery home to the MONON
via the NKP. Only the NKP found some tomato juice that need to be
transported to Nashville on the TC. The MONON did not get a share of the
revenue because the car was routed NKP-Lima-B&O-Cincinnati-L&N-TC. Once
unloaded in Nashville, #1 yo-yoed a bit through Tennessee, Virginia &
North Carolina carrying various commodities like lumber, tobacco &
sugar. On October 29th, it was loaded with cigarettes at Durham NC and
routed NS-SOU-TRRA-MKT-UP-SP to Oakland CA. It returned to Chicago with
a load of sugar. Then, on December 17th, it was loaded with syrup on the
B&OCT and routed via the MONON to the Indianapolis Union RR. Once
unloaded, another load of auto parts was found for Bloomfield NJ via the
NKP-ERIE. There the car was reloaded with drugs for San Francisco via
the ERIE-NKP-TRRA-SSW-SP.

Between the time #1 arrived in San Francisco on January 23rd, 1948 and
when it was empty in Norwood OH on May 28th, #1 made another trip to the
West Coast, as well as originating loads in Illinois, Tennessee,
Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas & Texas. Only because the MONON wanted
to display #1 at the Chicago RR Fair did the car come home by the
special request of the MONON.

While MONON #1's travels may have been on the extreme, there is no
reason to believe it was that much different than any other boxcar in
the US to the extent it stayed away from home rails. According to the
September 1951 B&M EMPLOYEES MAGAZINE, it was not unusual for a B&M
boxcar to stay away from home for four years at a time. The reasons why
were:

1) A boxcar could stay away from home because it could be reloaded with
a wide variety of commodities - #1 carried merchandise, signal material,
lumber, tomato juice, tobacco, cigarettes, sugar, syrup, coffee, drugs,
auto parts, coconuts, grain, feed, fuel and alumina. 27,000 (or 96%) of
MONON #1's 28,000 total car miles were loaded. In 1948-19, the average
boxcar miles loaded was about 76% while, in 1956-57. the percentage was
about 73.5%.
2) Interchange Rule #1 was to give precedence to loading foreign cars
before home road cars in order to reduce as much as possible empty car
mileage.
3) The rules to route loads in the direction of the home road had to be
ignored because of the boxcar shortage.

The most I think I have seen was three in a 90 car train. Can't wait
to get it all in and processed by road to get percentages! Some
surprises for me: SOU, L&N, IC, RI and MILW appear far more than I
would have thought.
I'm not shocked at all. The cars from the Southeast roads may have been
hauling material up north for the various textile mills -- or furniture
in the case of the Southern cars. Photos show most of these to be
40-foot Southern cars with 8- (and later) 10-foot doors. I also know
they were delivered to the freight house in New London regularly with
furniture for several retailers in the area.
In SOU wheel reports beaten Potomac Yard and Monroe VA, only 10% of the
northbound loads (59 of 585 boxcars) were loaded in SOU boxcars in one
report from the Fall of 1946; and in the Winter of 1948, the percentage
of SOU boxcars carrying northbound loads was 11.6% (65 cars) of the 558
boxcar total. These low percentages signify that the majority of SOU
boxcars appearing on the CV did not carry loads which originated on the
SOU.

Furthermore, of SOU's northbound loads in the two wheel reports, there
were more loadings of lumber, clay (kaolin?), paperboard and merchandise
than there were of carloads of furniture or textiles. Most of the latter
two commodities was carried in the merchandise cars anyhow. It may be
pertinent to note that, in WH Gherke's 1951 analysis of commodities and
traffic on the SAL, neither textiles or furniture was discussed because
of their insignificance as carload traffic.

The ownership distribution of foreign boxcars shown in the two SOU wheel
reports were roughly in the same proportion as the percent of ownership
of all US boxcars.

Milwaukee rib side cars
(again, looking at photo evidence, not documentary evidence) show up
regularly. I've never seen a B&O wagon top box -- lots of B&O hoppers
and but no boxes.
The problem with totaling sightings of boxcars from photos is that there
is no finite denominator. You never know what the next photo will yield.
A wheel report on the other hand is fixed in time. There can be no
additions. A wheel report is a sample, and how good that sample is has
to considered. For instance, I would not say that either of the two SOU
wheel reports reflect the split of car types (boxcars vs. hoppers, et
al.), but within those car types, the sample of ownership distribution
can be good ones.

In 1952, the percentage of ownership of boxcars in the US was:

Region/Road Percent of National Fleet
A) New England 2.3%
1) NH 0.8%
2) B&M 0.5%
3) MEC 0.5%
4) IRM 0.1%
5) CV 0.1%
6) Others 0.3%
B) Great Lakes 18.8%
1) NYC 9.6%
2) WAB 1.7%
3) NKP 1.5%
4) ERIE 1.4%
5) GTW 1.0%
6) P&LE 1.0%
7) Others 2.6%
C) Central East 16.3%
1) PRR 9.2%
2) B&O 3.8%
3) RDG 1.1%
4) Others 2.1%
D) Pocahontas 4.4%
1) C&O (in. PM) 3.0%
2) N&W 1.2%
3) Others 0.2%
E) Southern 14.2%
1) SOU 3.3%
2) IC 2.7%
3) ACL 1.9%
F) Northwest 15.5%
1) MILW 4.1%
2) C&NW 3.1%
3) GN 2.9%
4) NP 2.6%
5) SOO 1.1%
6) Others 1.7%
G) Central West 20.0%
1) ATSF 5.2%
2) SP - Pac Lines 4.2%
3) UP 3.7%
4) CB&Q 2.9%
5) CRI&P 2.7%
6) Others 1.3%
H) Southwest 8.5%
1) MP 2.5%
2) SLSF 1.8%
3) T&NO 1.1%
4) Others 3.1%

Cars from Midwestern roads were quite common -- remember the CV was
part of a freight route from the Pacific Northwest through Chicago and
ending up in New London. I've also noticed one PRR car seems to show up
in just about every train -- meaning the old Pennsy modelers' mantra
about us all being Pennsy modelers, while annoying and depressing, is
apparently quite true . . . . (that was a joke, Ben !. . . )
The PRR owned about the same number of boxcars as did the NYC. The
problem may be that there are not that many NYC modelers to have their
mantra.



(snip)

Coal loads apparently came and went from everywhere. The L&N coal gon
is a must-build project for me now, as is a Monon two-bay, which can be
seen in one of the photos of the CV Color Book from Morning Side.
What special qualities did Bituminous Coal mined in Southern Indiana
have that justified the incremental transportation cost for a New
England consumer over coal from fields of Western PA or northern West
Virginia? Under the premise that was none, a MONON hopper on the CV
either carried another commodity, or was loaded as a "stray" with
bituminous at a "nearer by" mine.

The loaded/empty car mile ratio of hoppers was in the order of 55/45 as
there was not much opportunity to reload them with commodities on their
trips back to the mines. Thus, hoppers were pretty much based in the
areas where the mines were - for MONON, that would be the southern
Indiana fields; for the B&O, that could be western PA, southeastern Ohio
or northern WV; for the IC, southern Illinois; for the L&N, west of the
Appalachians & Alabama; for the N&W, VGN & C&O, southern WV.

The distribution of coal was widespread, but governed a bit by
differences in cost. Thus, a consumer on the CV could order coal from
mines located in western PA which was served by the NYC, PRR or B&O or
in northern WV served by the WM or B&O. If he needed the special
qualities offered by Pocahontas coal, he could pay the premium for that
mined on the C&O, VGN or N&W.

How could "strays" happen? Using the MONON example, the hopper was
loaded in southern IN for a customer, say, in Richmond IN on the PRR.
When emptied, the hopper was set on a track containing a lot of other
hoppers. The yardmaster was not about to take the time to split the
MONON hopper from the string of PRR hoppers so when he gets the orders
to move the empty hoppers eastwards to the western PA fields, the MONON
hopper went along.

Marty, perhaps we can discuss further in Naperville.

Tim Gilbert


BuyGone Treasures <buygone@...>
 

Tim:

Your dissertation on the movement of freight cars was excellent. Having
worked for the Southern Pacific for 25 years I have first hand knowledge of
the appropriation of foreign line equipment for supplying customers for
outbound loads. We did it all of the time.

Paul C. Koehler

-----Original Message-----
From: Tim Gilbert [mailto:tgilbert@...]
Sent: Friday, October 22, 2004 8:39 AM
To: STMFC@...
Cc: Jeff Lodge; Marty McGuirk
Subject: Re: [STMFC] What the pics and papers show????


Marty McGuirk wrote in response to Jeff Lodge's query:

(snip)


One thing I have noticed a big lack of is CV BOXCARS! Where were
they all?
Most were on the GTW. They really didn't spend a lot of time on the
home road, but I have seen enough of them on the CV to know they're
appropriate -- three in a 90 car train sounds about right!
Marty,

CV boxcars could be dispersed all over the country similar to any other
boxcar in the 1945-1955 period. On January 27, 1948, CV boxcar #40002 was
carrying whiskey southbound on the SOU between Pot Yard and Monroe VA. Also,
on the same SOU train, was CV #41388 carrying aluminum. On May 28th, 1949,
CV boxcar #40177 was carrying merchandise southbound to Edinburg TX on the
T&NO. So far as I know, there were no distilleries or aluminum smelters on
the CV.

But a better example of this dispersion may be the travels of MONON 40'
PS-1 Boxcar #1 between June 16th, 1947 and June 6th, 1948 which traveled
about 28,000 miles of which only about 500 (1.8% of the total) of them were
on the MONON. #1 left Crawfordsville IN with a load of merchandise for the
L&N's Louisville freight house. When the car was unloaded, did the L&N ship
the car back to the MONON?

No, they reloaded it with more merchandise and sent it southward to
Nashville. Eventually, after a few more unloadings/reloadings, #1 arrived in
Miami (SAL) from whence it was reloaded and sent north to Savannah. For a
couple of weeks, it yo-yoed in the Carolinas and Georgia carrying
merchandise. Finally on July 20th, 1947, it left Cayce SC with signal
material for Apex NC. On August 7th, it was loaded with lumber at Sanford NC
(SAL) and routed SAL-RF&P-PRR-D&H-NYO&W to Jermyn Transfer PA where it was
unloaded. Not finding a load, did the O&W route it back to the
D&H-PRR-RF&P-SAL?

No, it was delivered to the DL&W for a direct delivery home to the MONON via
the NKP. Only the NKP found some tomato juice that need to be transported to
Nashville on the TC. The MONON did not get a share of the revenue because
the car was routed NKP-Lima-B&O-Cincinnati-L&N-TC. Once unloaded in
Nashville, #1 yo-yoed a bit through Tennessee, Virginia & North Carolina
carrying various commodities like lumber, tobacco & sugar. On October 29th,
it was loaded with cigarettes at Durham NC and routed NS-SOU-TRRA-MKT-UP-SP
to Oakland CA. It returned to Chicago with a load of sugar. Then, on
December 17th, it was loaded with syrup on the B&OCT and routed via the
MONON to the Indianapolis Union RR. Once unloaded, another load of auto
parts was found for Bloomfield NJ via the NKP-ERIE. There the car was
reloaded with drugs for San Francisco via the ERIE-NKP-TRRA-SSW-SP.

Between the time #1 arrived in San Francisco on January 23rd, 1948 and when
it was empty in Norwood OH on May 28th, #1 made another trip to the West
Coast, as well as originating loads in Illinois, Tennessee, Mississippi,
Louisiana, Arkansas & Texas. Only because the MONON wanted to display #1 at
the Chicago RR Fair did the car come home by the special request of the
MONON.

While MONON #1's travels may have been on the extreme, there is no reason to
believe it was that much different than any other boxcar in the US to the
extent it stayed away from home rails. According to the September 1951 B&M
EMPLOYEES MAGAZINE, it was not unusual for a B&M boxcar to stay away from
home for four years at a time. The reasons why
were:

1) A boxcar could stay away from home because it could be reloaded with a
wide variety of commodities - #1 carried merchandise, signal material,
lumber, tomato juice, tobacco, cigarettes, sugar, syrup, coffee, drugs, auto
parts, coconuts, grain, feed, fuel and alumina. 27,000 (or 96%) of MONON
#1's 28,000 total car miles were loaded. In 1948-19, the average boxcar
miles loaded was about 76% while, in 1956-57. the percentage was about
73.5%.
2) Interchange Rule #1 was to give precedence to loading foreign cars before
home road cars in order to reduce as much as possible empty car mileage.
3) The rules to route loads in the direction of the home road had to be
ignored because of the boxcar shortage.

The most I think I have seen was three in a 90 car train. Can't wait
to get it all in and processed by road to get percentages! Some
surprises for me: SOU, L&N, IC, RI and MILW appear far more than I
would have thought.
I'm not shocked at all. The cars from the Southeast roads may have
been hauling material up north for the various textile mills -- or
furniture in the case of the Southern cars. Photos show most of these
to be 40-foot Southern cars with 8- (and later) 10-foot doors. I also
know they were delivered to the freight house in New London regularly
with furniture for several retailers in the area.
In SOU wheel reports beaten Potomac Yard and Monroe VA, only 10% of the
northbound loads (59 of 585 boxcars) were loaded in SOU boxcars in one
report from the Fall of 1946; and in the Winter of 1948, the percentage of
SOU boxcars carrying northbound loads was 11.6% (65 cars) of the 558 boxcar
total. These low percentages signify that the majority of SOU boxcars
appearing on the CV did not carry loads which originated on the SOU.

Furthermore, of SOU's northbound loads in the two wheel reports, there were
more loadings of lumber, clay (kaolin?), paperboard and merchandise than
there were of carloads of furniture or textiles. Most of the latter two
commodities was carried in the merchandise cars anyhow. It may be pertinent
to note that, in WH Gherke's 1951 analysis of commodities and traffic on the
SAL, neither textiles or furniture was discussed because of their
insignificance as carload traffic.

The ownership distribution of foreign boxcars shown in the two SOU wheel
reports were roughly in the same proportion as the percent of ownership of
all US boxcars.

Milwaukee rib side cars
(again, looking at photo evidence, not documentary evidence) show up
regularly. I've never seen a B&O wagon top box -- lots of B&O hoppers
and but no boxes.
The problem with totaling sightings of boxcars from photos is that there is
no finite denominator. You never know what the next photo will yield.
A wheel report on the other hand is fixed in time. There can be no
additions. A wheel report is a sample, and how good that sample is has to
considered. For instance, I would not say that either of the two SOU wheel
reports reflect the split of car types (boxcars vs. hoppers, et al.), but
within those car types, the sample of ownership distribution can be good
ones.

In 1952, the percentage of ownership of boxcars in the US was:

Region/Road Percent of National Fleet
A) New England 2.3%
1) NH 0.8%
2) B&M 0.5%
3) MEC 0.5%
4) IRM 0.1%
5) CV 0.1%
6) Others 0.3%
B) Great Lakes 18.8%
1) NYC 9.6%
2) WAB 1.7%
3) NKP 1.5%
4) ERIE 1.4%
5) GTW 1.0%
6) P&LE 1.0%
7) Others 2.6%
C) Central East 16.3%
1) PRR 9.2%
2) B&O 3.8%
3) RDG 1.1%
4) Others 2.1%
D) Pocahontas 4.4%
1) C&O (in. PM) 3.0%
2) N&W 1.2%
3) Others 0.2%
E) Southern 14.2%
1) SOU 3.3%
2) IC 2.7%
3) ACL 1.9%
F) Northwest 15.5%
1) MILW 4.1%
2) C&NW 3.1%
3) GN 2.9%
4) NP 2.6%
5) SOO 1.1%
6) Others 1.7%
G) Central West 20.0%
1) ATSF 5.2%
2) SP - Pac Lines 4.2%
3) UP 3.7%
4) CB&Q 2.9%
5) CRI&P 2.7%
6) Others 1.3%
H) Southwest 8.5%
1) MP 2.5%
2) SLSF 1.8%
3) T&NO 1.1%
4) Others 3.1%

Cars from Midwestern roads were quite common -- remember the CV was
part of a freight route from the Pacific Northwest through Chicago and
ending up in New London. I've also noticed one PRR car seems to show
up in just about every train -- meaning the old Pennsy modelers'
mantra about us all being Pennsy modelers, while annoying and
depressing, is apparently quite true . . . . (that was a joke, Ben !.
. . )
The PRR owned about the same number of boxcars as did the NYC. The problem
may be that there are not that many NYC modelers to have their mantra.



(snip)

Coal loads apparently came and went from everywhere. The L&N coal gon
is a must-build project for me now, as is a Monon two-bay, which can be
seen in one of the photos of the CV Color Book from Morning Side.
What special qualities did Bituminous Coal mined in Southern Indiana
have that justified the incremental transportation cost for a New
England consumer over coal from fields of Western PA or northern West
Virginia? Under the premise that was none, a MONON hopper on the CV
either carried another commodity, or was loaded as a "stray" with
bituminous at a "nearer by" mine.

The loaded/empty car mile ratio of hoppers was in the order of 55/45 as
there was not much opportunity to reload them with commodities on their
trips back to the mines. Thus, hoppers were pretty much based in the
areas where the mines were - for MONON, that would be the southern
Indiana fields; for the B&O, that could be western PA, southeastern Ohio
or northern WV; for the IC, southern Illinois; for the L&N, west of the
Appalachians & Alabama; for the N&W, VGN & C&O, southern WV.

The distribution of coal was widespread, but governed a bit by
differences in cost. Thus, a consumer on the CV could order coal from
mines located in western PA which was served by the NYC, PRR or B&O or
in northern WV served by the WM or B&O. If he needed the special
qualities offered by Pocahontas coal, he could pay the premium for that
mined on the C&O, VGN or N&W.

How could "strays" happen? Using the MONON example, the hopper was
loaded in southern IN for a customer, say, in Richmond IN on the PRR.
When emptied, the hopper was set on a track containing a lot of other
hoppers. The yardmaster was not about to take the time to split the
MONON hopper from the string of PRR hoppers so when he gets the orders
to move the empty hoppers eastwards to the western PA fields, the MONON
hopper went along.

Marty, perhaps we can discuss further in Naperville.

Tim Gilbert









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