More old photos


Bob Webber <zephyr1@...>
 

Sorry for the interruption - but some of these are just too nice not to share...

For those who went into the Utah Shipler collection and DIDN'T look at the panoramic collection, you missed out. The description say "the beauty of the intermountain west in panoramic photos". Well if you are a mine lover, a railroad lover or a truck lover I suppose that is so.

You'll also find for example a lot full of PIE trailers and cabs from 1946

http://content.lib.utah.edu/cgi-bin/htmldoc.exe?CISOROOT=/USHS_Shipler&CISOPTR=9902

But there is the Gold Coast Limited, there are a few UP photos, there are A LOT of mine photos, and a lot of general railroad photos masquerading as mine load photos. You won't find nice close ups, but you will find some great scenes and some great ideas. And you will
see some cars there that just don't seem to be in the right place.

Searching is a bit harder, but it's worth while taking your time looking at some of the coal and iron mining operations. There are some hoopers in the iron mining scenes that are kind of useful. Your mileage may vary, and I know this is all western stuff, but there are some neat photos in this part of the collection. Besides, taking a look at the Bingham hole in the ground with all those trains running around the bowl is really neat....


Bob Webber <zephyr1@...>
 

Oh - for some nice tanks, check out photo 142

At 09:14 PM 11/20/2004, you wrote:

Sorry for the interruption - but some of these are just too nice not to
share...

For those who went into the Utah Shipler collection and DIDN'T look at the
panoramic collection, you missed out. The description say "the beauty of
the intermountain west in panoramic photos". Well if you are a mine
lover, a railroad lover or a truck lover I suppose that is so.

You'll also find for example a lot full of PIE trailers and cabs from 1946

http://content.lib.utah.edu/cgi-bin/htmldoc.exe?CISOROOT=/USHS_Shipler&CISOPTR=9902

But there is the Gold Coast Limited, there are a few UP photos, there are A
LOT of mine photos, and a lot of general railroad photos masquerading as
mine load photos. You won't find nice close ups, but you will find some
great scenes and some great ideas. And you will
see some cars there that just don't seem to be in the right place.

Searching is a bit harder, but it's worth while taking your time looking at
some of the coal and iron mining operations. There are some hoopers in the
iron mining scenes that are kind of useful. Your mileage may vary, and I
know this is all western stuff, but there are some neat photos in this part
of the collection. Besides, taking a look at the Bingham hole in the
ground with all those trains running around the bowl is really neat....





Yahoo! Groups Links




Tim O'Connor
 

You'll also find for example a lot full of PIE trailers and cabs from 1946
http://content.lib.utah.edu/cgi-bin/htmldoc.exe?CISOROOT=/USHS_Shipler&CISOPTR=9902

P-I-E truck terminal
http://content.lib.utah.edu/USHS_Shipler/image/35721179102002_39222000706841.jpg
Oil refinery... (north of Salt Lake City)
http://content.lib.utah.edu/USHS_Shipler/image/17323172082002_39222000702980.jpg
http://content.lib.utah.edu/USHS_Shipler/image/98322172082002_39222000702972.jpg
Utah Apex mine... (defies description)
http://content.lib.utah.edu/USHS_Shipler/image/75222172082002_39222000702964.jpg
http://content.lib.utah.edu/USHS_Shipler/image/12819172592002_39222000706221.jpg
Texaco oil dealer... (neat as a pin)
http://content.lib.utah.edu/USHS_Shipler/image/88716182862002_164412286200239222000702956.jpg
Union Portland Cement, Devil's Slide...
http://content.lib.utah.edu/USHS_Shipler/image/74214172592002_39222000706171.jpg
Gold Coast at Salt Lake City...
http://content.lib.utah.edu/USHS_Shipler/image/48314182862002_144412286200239222000702790.jpg
Castle Valley train...
http://content.lib.utah.edu/USHS_Shipler/image/47133214112002_39222000728423.jpg
Citizen's Coal Company... (before and after)
http://content.lib.utah.edu/USHS_Shipler/image/4415182862002_144412286200239222000702816.jpg
http://content.lib.utah.edu/USHS_Shipler/image/64121172082002_39222000702832.jpg
Magna-Arthur Mills... (is this what they call a stamp mill?)
http://content.lib.utah.edu/USHS_Shipler/image/9052172592002_39222000700869.jpg
Moffat Road, Colorado... (is this Rollins Pass?)
http://content.lib.utah.edu/USHS_Shipler/image/18520179102002_39222000706833.jpg
UP in Weber Canyon... (musta been a washout)
http://content.lib.utah.edu/USHS_Shipler/image/9218179102002_39222000706791.jpg
"Cudahy Crossing"... (FGE reefers on D&RGW. Look at those brake beams.)
http://content.lib.utah.edu/USHS_Shipler/image/29615151482002_39222000700489.jpg
I don't think it's a DC-3... so what is it?
http://content.lib.utah.edu/USHS_Shipler/image/88058152382002_39222000700570.jpg

Tim O.


Roger Miener <Roger.Miener@...>
 

Tim O'Connor says ...

I don't think it's a DC-3... so what is it?
http://content.lib.utah.edu/USHS_Shipler/image/88058152382002_39222000700570.jpg

Hi Tim,

Think Convair ... That is my first guess ... DC-3s were tail draggers
and the animal in question certainly ain't a tail dragger. Convairs
were tricycles. They had a nose wheel.

Oops, let's think about this again. Maybe it is a DC-bigger than 3 -
everything from Douglas after the three had a nose wheel.

So does that make it a DC-4? I don't know. It is obvious that the
airplane in the photo has four engines (I think that Convairs of the
era only had two engines) and this dude has got a nose wheel. Well,
DC-4, DC-6 ??? Pretty sure it ain't a DC-7.

Roger Miener
at Tacoma WA


Old Sourdough <pmeaton@...>
 

At 10:31 PM 11/20/2004 -0800, you wrote:
Tim O'Connor says ...

I don't think it's a DC-3... so what is it?
http://content.lib.utah.edu/USHS_Shipler/image/88058152382002_39222000700570.jpg

Hi Tim,

Think Convair ... That is my first guess ... DC-3s were tail draggers
and the animal in question certainly ain't a tail dragger. Convairs
were tricycles. They had a nose wheel.

Oops, let's think about this again. Maybe it is a DC-bigger than 3 -
everything from Douglas after the three had a nose wheel.

So does that make it a DC-4? I don't know. It is obvious that the
airplane in the photo has four engines (I think that Convairs of the
era only had two engines) and this dude has got a nose wheel. Well,
DC-4, DC-6 ??? Pretty sure it ain't a DC-7.

Roger Miener
at Tacoma WA
===================================
Roger,

The Convair prop driven planes have distinctive vertical tail
surfaces. Note a recent example at:

http://www.airliners.net/info/stats.main?id=169

You are correct that the plane is ether a DC-4 or a DC-6, although I hope
that the pictured aircraft is a DC-4, because it is at least of the correct
time frame for the steam era.

http://www.airliners.net/open.file/113419/L/

http://www.ruudleeuw.com/dc6.htm

Even though some were used exclusively in cargo service, I doubt that, the
correct era notwithstanding, they could be considered freight cars.

Paul Eaton


The Old Sourdough
Ruksakinmakiak, Alaska


Scott Pitzer
 

It's a DC-4 (too short to be a DC-6.)

This photo is more proof that all the COOL field trips happened before I was in school!

Now quit talking about airplanes!

Scott Pitzer
=======

-----Original Message-----
From: Old Sourdough <pmeaton@...>
Sent: Nov 20, 2004 11:13 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] More old photos


At 10:31 PM 11/20/2004 -0800, you wrote:
Tim O'Connor says ...

I don't think it's a DC-3... so what is it?
http://content.lib.utah.edu/USHS_Shipler/image/88058152382002_39222000700570.jpg

Hi Tim,

Think Convair ... That is my first guess ... DC-3s were tail draggers
and the animal in question certainly ain't a tail dragger. Convairs
were tricycles. They had a nose wheel.

Oops, let's think about this again. Maybe it is a DC-bigger than 3 -
everything from Douglas after the three had a nose wheel.

So does that make it a DC-4? I don't know. It is obvious that the
airplane in the photo has four engines (I think that Convairs of the
era only had two engines) and this dude has got a nose wheel. Well,
DC-4, DC-6 ??? Pretty sure it ain't a DC-7.

Roger Miener
at Tacoma WA
===================================
Roger,

The Convair prop driven planes have distinctive vertical tail
surfaces. Note a recent example at:

http://www.airliners.net/info/stats.main?id=169

You are correct that the plane is ether a DC-4 or a DC-6, although I hope
that the pictured aircraft is a DC-4, because it is at least of the correct
time frame for the steam era.

http://www.airliners.net/open.file/113419/L/

http://www.ruudleeuw.com/dc6.htm

Even though some were used exclusively in cargo service, I doubt that, the
correct era notwithstanding, they could be considered freight cars.

Paul Eaton


The Old Sourdough
Ruksakinmakiak, Alaska








Yahoo! Groups Links


Brian Paul Ehni <behni@...>
 

It's not a DC-3 for several reasons: 4 motors instead of 2, not a tail
dragger being the most obvious. I believe it's a DC-7.
--

Brian Ehni


From: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
Reply-To: <STMFC@...>
Date: Sun, 21 Nov 2004 00:40:18 -0500
To: <STMFC@...>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] More old photos


I don't think it's a DC-3... so what is it?
<http://content.lib.utah.edu/USHS_Shipler/image/88058152382002_3922200070057
0.jpg>

Tim O.


Brian Paul Ehni <behni@...>
 

I don't think it's a Douglas, now. After Googleing the different DC planes
(4, 6, 7), I notice all photos show SQUARE windows, while the craft in
question has OVAL.

To get back to steam era cars..... Oh, I can't make any stretch to get this
back on topic!!!
--

Brian Ehni

From: Roger Miener <Roger.Miener@...>
Reply-To: <STMFC@...>
Date: Sat, 20 Nov 2004 22:31:02 -0800
To: <STMFC@...>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] More old photos


Tim O'Connor says ...

I don't think it's a DC-3... so what is it?
http://content.lib.utah.edu/USHS_Shipler/image/88058152382002_39222000700570.j
pg

Hi Tim,

Think Convair ... That is my first guess ... DC-3s were tail draggers
and the animal in question certainly ain't a tail dragger. Convairs
were tricycles. They had a nose wheel.

Oops, let's think about this again. Maybe it is a DC-bigger than 3 -
everything from Douglas after the three had a nose wheel.

So does that make it a DC-4? I don't know. It is obvious that the
airplane in the photo has four engines (I think that Convairs of the
era only had two engines) and this dude has got a nose wheel. Well,
DC-4, DC-6 ??? Pretty sure it ain't a DC-7.

Roger Miener
at Tacoma WA


Brian Paul Ehni <behni@...>
 

However, looking up the tail number indicates it's a C-54, but flying for
"Northeast".

And C-54s had OVAL windows: http://www.warbirdalley.com/c54.htm
--

Brian Ehni

From: Roger Miener <Roger.Miener@...>
Reply-To: <STMFC@...>
Date: Sat, 20 Nov 2004 22:31:02 -0800
To: <STMFC@...>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] More old photos


Tim O'Connor says ...

I don't think it's a DC-3... so what is it?
http://content.lib.utah.edu/USHS_Shipler/image/88058152382002_39222000700570.j
pg

Hi Tim,

Think Convair ... That is my first guess ... DC-3s were tail draggers
and the animal in question certainly ain't a tail dragger. Convairs
were tricycles. They had a nose wheel.

Oops, let's think about this again. Maybe it is a DC-bigger than 3 -
everything from Douglas after the three had a nose wheel.

So does that make it a DC-4? I don't know. It is obvious that the
airplane in the photo has four engines (I think that Convairs of the
era only had two engines) and this dude has got a nose wheel. Well,
DC-4, DC-6 ??? Pretty sure it ain't a DC-7.

Roger Miener
at Tacoma WA





Yahoo! Groups Links







Richard Hendrickson
 

Tim O'Connor's

I don't think it's a DC-3... so what is it?
http://content.lib.utah.edu/USHS_Shipler/image/88058152382002_39222000700570.jpg

unleashed a torrent of speculation from underage listmembers who were
presumably in diapers at the time. It's a Douglas DC-4, guys. Sheesh!

If I weren't afraid of incurring Mike's wrath for being totally off-topic,
I'd post a photo to give y'all a real identification challenge...maybe a
Myers OTW or a Zlin 526.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


Spen Kellogg <spenkell@...>
 

Brian Paul Ehni wrote:

However, looking up the tail number indicates it's a C-54, but flying for
"Northeast".

And C-54s had OVAL windows: http://www.warbirdalley.com/c54.htm
Which were known in civilian life as DC-4s.

Regards, Spen Kellogg


raildata@...
 

The coal is clearly "mine run", or not crushed and graded. I saw bituminous
coal like this dumped in front of people's houses in southern Ohio in the 60s.
Just takes a couple of whacks with and axe or hammper to break it up.

Anthracite is something much more difficult when it comes to breaking lumps.

Chuck Yungkurth
Boulder CO, but raised in Smokestack America


Jeff Lodge <cvfanbratt@...>
 

Tim forwarded some links of interest from the Utah site. My question about the coal dealer (in the link below) - What customer would want a load of coal the size of the stuff in the truck directly in front of the building?

Being that big, I can't see that it would burn cleanly. Would the coal be any cheaper in such a large grade to make it cost effective for a client to have a crusher?

Obviously this is of direct interest to those of us who will be shipping coal in our scale empires......

Thanks,
Jeff Lodge
Brattleboro, VT

Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:
Citizen's Coal Company... (before)
http://content.lib.utah.edu/USHS_Shipler/image/4415182862002_144412286200239222000702816.jpg


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Meet the all-new My Yahoo! Try it today!

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Charles Etheredge
 

--- In STMFC@..., Richard Hendrickson
<rhendrickson@o...> wrote:

If I weren't afraid of incurring Mike's wrath for being totally
off-topic,
I'd post a photo to give y'all a real identification
challenge...maybe a
Myers OTW or a Zlin 526.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520

Richard, how about my all-time favorite, the Staggerwing!


Bob Webber <zephyr1@...>
 

I'm not sure, but I would think that it might go to a smaller dealer or to a large customer that does have means to crush it. Note in the piles in
the yard, there is more of that grade too. Heck, you put one of those
lumps of coal in some stoves and you have heat for one night easy!

One thing that I do see - if you use the links Tim sent, you get the
panoramic views on one page - which is nice, but one some of the views it
ruins the effect and the detail. Particularly of the Apex and Bingham
scenes, where having to scroll back and forth to trace the routes is half
the fun.

I have seen one model of a open pit, and after looking at the two examples,
I can see there being, in some cases, more operation in these mines and
complexes than on some layouts. And the nice thing is, there is no need to
excuse the use of multi-level tracks!

At 08:09 PM 11/21/2004, you wrote:

Tim forwarded some links of interest from the Utah site. My question
about the coal dealer (in the link below) - What customer would want a
load of coal the size of the stuff in the truck directly in front of the
building?

Being that big, I can't see that it would burn cleanly. Would the coal be
any cheaper in such a large grade to make it cost effective for a client
to have a crusher?

Obviously this is of direct interest to those of us who will be shipping
coal in our scale empires......

Thanks,
Jeff Lodge
Brattleboro, VT

Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:
Citizen's Coal Company... (before)
http://content.lib.utah.edu/USHS_Shipler/image/4415182862002_144412286200239222000702816.jpg


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Meet the all-new My Yahoo! ­ Try it today!







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Brian Paul Ehni <behni@...>
 

Well, it means we can use O scale coal! 8^)
--

Brian Ehni

From: Jeff Lodge <cvfanbratt@...>
Reply-To: <STMFC@...>
Date: Sun, 21 Nov 2004 18:09:32 -0800 (PST)
To: <STMFC@...>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] More old photos


Tim forwarded some links of interest from the Utah site. My question about
the coal dealer (in the link below) - What customer would want a load of coal
the size of the stuff in the truck directly in front of the building?

Being that big, I can't see that it would burn cleanly. Would the coal be any
cheaper in such a large grade to make it cost effective for a client to have a
crusher?

Obviously this is of direct interest to those of us who will be shipping coal
in our scale empires......

Thanks,
Jeff Lodge
Brattleboro, VT

Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:
Citizen's Coal Company... (before)
http://content.lib.utah.edu/USHS_Shipler/image/4415182862002_14441228620023922
2000702816.jpg


armprem
 

Coal was sometimes delivered in canvas bags for small orders.Are we looking
at some of those bags rather than chunks of coal?Armand Premo;

----- Original Message -----
From: "Jeff Lodge" <cvfanbratt@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Sunday, November 21, 2004 9:09 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] More old photos



Tim forwarded some links of interest from the Utah site. My question about
the coal dealer (in the link below) - What customer would want a load of
coal the size of the stuff in the truck directly in front of the building?

Being that big, I can't see that it would burn cleanly. Would the coal be
any cheaper in such a large grade to make it cost effective for a client to
have a crusher?

Obviously this is of direct interest to those of us who will be shipping
coal in our scale empires......

Thanks,
Jeff Lodge
Brattleboro, VT

Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:
Citizen's Coal Company... (before)
http://content.lib.utah.edu/USHS_Shipler/image/4415182862002_144412286200239
222000702816.jpg


---------------------------------
Do you Yahoo!?
Meet the all-new My Yahoo! - Try it today!







Yahoo! Groups Links


Tim O'Connor
 

One thing that I do see - if you use the links Tim sent, you get the
panoramic views on one page - which is nice, but one some of the views it
ruins the effect and the detail.
?????

Bob, it sounds like you need to get a real web browser... Mine can zoom
in or out on any photo image with a simple click on the picture.


Roger Miener <Roger.Miener@...>
 

Charles Etheredge says ...

Richard, how about my all-time favorite, the Staggerwing!
Oh dear Charles, that one? The Staggerwing Beechcraft? Yes, it is a
STMFC era airplane. And, it is indeed an awesome airplane, but it is
also one that leaks oil into the drip pan like there is no tomorrow!

In other words, the Beechcraft Staggerwing leaks oil profusely!

Cessna produced (Cessna 195) a very nice piece of work about the same
time. It did not leak oil quite so bad.

Whatever -- In either event - the Staggerwing and the Cessna 195 - ,
in each case the sound is round (the soothing rumble of a radial
engine) - something that Richard Hendrickson's little rag wing tail
dragger can't do.

However, sound or no - it (Richard's tail dragger) sure is fun to fly.
Rogue River Country.

Richard lives in Ashland, Oregon. Ashland, Oregon - well, I tell you
what. It is a really neat place for an airport and a nice place to
hanger a rag wing tail dragger.

Roger Miener
(who is not as young as Richard Hendrickson would suggest)
at Tacoma Wa

PS Richard, how about the Howard DGA (Damn Good Airplane), otherwise
known as the aluminum overcast. Ever see one of them? Howard in
airplanes was like Overland Models in model railroad circles. In each
case, there were not very many of them built.