Tank Car ID Help Needed


Scott Seders
 

Following is a link to my personal web page.

http://home.comcast.net/~sseders/tankcar.html

I have uploaded an enlarged portion of a photo taken in August, 1956 of an
empty hopper train departing Grafton, WV on the B&O. Unfortunately, the
original photo is not very sharp. At the front of the train is a tank car.
All that is visible is the shape and color of the lettering and logo.

I am cerebrally challenged when it comes to tank cars. Can anyone tell me
who this car belongs to? Any info would be of great help.

Thanks,
D. Scott Seders


Ted Culotta <tculotta@...>
 

On Dec 17, 2004, at 8:07 AM, Scott Seders wrote:

Following is a link to my personal web page.

http://home.comcast.net/~sseders/tankcar.html

I have uploaded an enlarged portion of a photo taken in August, 1956
of an
empty hopper train departing Grafton, WV on the B&O. Unfortunately,
the
original photo is not very sharp.   At the front of the train is a
tank car.
All that is visible is the shape and color of the lettering and logo.

I am cerebrally challenged when it comes to tank cars.  Can anyone
tell me
who this car belongs to?  Any info would be of great help.
Scott:

It looks to me like a Dow ICC 104 insulated car, but that's a guess
based upon the shape of the emblem.

Regards,
Ted Culotta

Speedwitch Media
100 14th Avenue, San Mateo, CA 94402
info@...
www.speedwitch.com
(650) 787-1912


Tim O'Connor
 

http://home.comcast.net/~sseders/tankcar.html

I am cerebrally challenged when it comes to tank cars. Can anyone tell me
who this car belongs to? Any info would be of great help.
Looks like a Dow Chemical tank car. The Ohio, Kanahwa and
other river valleys in that region had (still have) lots of
chemical plants. Judging by the type of car (insulated 103)
I would guess it's for sodium carbonate or sodium hydroxide,
two common industrial chemicals.


Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

On Dec 17, 2004, at 8:07 AM, Scott Seders wrote:


Following is a link to my personal web page.

http://home.comcast.net/~sseders/tankcar.html
<http://home.comcast.net/%7Esseders/tankcar.html>

I have uploaded an enlarged portion of a photo taken in August, 1956
of an
empty hopper train departing Grafton, WV on the B&O. Unfortunately,
the
original photo is not very sharp. At the front of the train is a
tank car.
All that is visible is the shape and color of the lettering and logo.

I am cerebrally challenged when it comes to tank cars. Can anyone
tell me
who this car belongs to? Any info would be of great help.
Ted Culotta replied:

Scott:

It looks to me like a Dow ICC 104 insulated car, but that's a guess
based upon the shape of the emblem.
In the April 1955 ORER, the only Dow cars listed were from their Texas Division (128 cars - all ICC-103's having five or six digit numbers) and 3 cars from their Canadian Division based in Vancouver BC.

Another guess based upon the shape of the emblem would be the Diamond Alkali Company but most of these 237 cars were intended for chlorine, vinyl chloride or methyl chloride - ICC types 105 & 106. I believe that tank cars carrying chlorine did not have expansion domes so that should shoot down Diamond as the owner as a possibility.

It is possible, however, that either Dow or Diamond leased long term this car from one of the private tank car leasing companies such as GATX, SHPX, or, maybe UTLX - UTLX had just got into the chemical car leasing business in 1952-53.

Can anybody recall a company with a diamond logo which would be used on tank cars?

Tim Gilbert


Richard Hendrickson
 

http://home.comcast.net/~sseders/tankcar.html

I am cerebrally challenged when it comes to tank cars. Can anyone tell me
who this car belongs to? Any info would be of great help.
Looks like a Dow Chemical tank car. The Ohio, Kanahwa and
other river valleys in that region had (still have) lots of
chemical plants. Judging by the type of car (insulated 103)
I would guess it's for sodium carbonate or sodium hydroxide,
two common industrial chemicals.
Tim is correct that this is a Dow Chemical Co. tank car, in this case a 10K
gal. ICC-104 (or insulated ICC-103, which amounts to the same thing) built
in the 1920s by the Standard Tank Car Co. - note the distinctive sloping
box bolsters.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


Tim O'Connor
 

Tim Gilbert wrote

Another guess based upon the shape of the emblem would be the Diamond
Alkali Company but most of these 237 cars were intended for chlorine,
vinyl chloride or methyl chloride - ICC types 105 & 106. I believe that
tank cars carrying chlorine did not have expansion domes so that should
shoot down Diamond as the owner as a possibility.
http://home.comcast.net/~sseders/tankcar.html

Tim, that is a good guess, but the Diamond Alkali emblem was multicolor
and had writing through it that extended beyond the edges of the diamond.
I have a 1956 photo of a Diamond Alkali 103W with a large dome, with
reporting marks GATX 32991. In fact, I'm pretty sure it's the only car
I've ever seen that matches the Overland brass model #3229. Unfortunately
I don't know of any decals for it.

I would very much like to see a better photo of that 10k Dow tank car.
Dow leased cars so not all of them had DOWX reporting marks -- I have
photos of GATX Dow Chemical tank cars, for example. Dow was a big outfit
based in Michigan, not Texas, but they had chemical plants in several
states.



From Tim O'Connor

Looks like a Dow Chemical tank car. The Ohio, Kanahwa and
other river valleys in that region had (still have) lots of
chemical plants. Judging by the type of car (insulated 103)
I would guess it's for sodium carbonate or sodium hydroxide,
two common industrial chemicals.
Response from Tim Gilbert

In the April 1955 ORER, the only Dow cars listed were from their Texas
Division (128 cars - all ICC-103's having five or six digit numbers) and
3 cars from their Canadian Division based in Vancouver BC.
Response from Richard H. Hendrickson

Tim is correct that this is a Dow Chemical Co. tank car, in this case a 10K
gal. ICC-104 (or insulated ICC-103, which amounts to the same thing) built
in the 1920s by the Standard Tank Car Co. - note the distinctive sloping
box bolsters.


Thomas Baker
 

It's hard to be certain, but do I detect friction-bearing trucks on the tank car?

Tom

________________________________


Bruce Smith <smithbf@...>
 

On Dec 17, 2004, at 11:54 AM, Thomas Baker wrote:

It's hard to be certain, but do I detect friction-bearing trucks on
the tank car?
They sure look like plain bearing trucks. Why would you wonder? Given
the date, 1958, that is extremely reasonable... look at the two B&O
hoppers following.

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" - Benjamin
Franklin
__
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__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________
|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |
| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||
|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|
| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0


Richard Hendrickson
 

On Dec 17, 2004, at 11:54 AM, Thomas Baker wrote:

It's hard to be certain, but do I detect friction-bearing trucks on
the tank car?
And Bruce Smith replied:

They sure look like plain bearing trucks. Why would you wonder? Given
the date, 1958, that is extremely reasonable... look at the two B&O
hoppers following.
It's a small matter, but thanks to Bruce for using the correct terminology
in his response. Trucks that did not have roller bearings were plain
bearing or solid bearing trucks, NOT "friction bearing" trucks.
Unfortunately, many modelers have bought into what was essentially a scam
on the part of roller bearing manufacturers, the use of "friction bearing"
to describe solid bearing trucks; the fact is that all bearings (including
roller bearings) have friction, and though roller bearing trucks required
less effort to start from rest, once in motion they had little, if any,
less rolling resistance (i.e., friction) than solid bearing trucks under
most conditions. That roller bearings made trains easier to start was, of
course, a significant advantage, but it was not at all the case that solid
bearing trucks had friction and roller bearing didn't.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Thomas Baker wrote:
It's hard to be certain, but do I detect friction-bearing trucks on the tank car?
No, no. They are solid-bearing trucks. All trucks sustain friction.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history