Trix/Marklin Chlorine tank cars


Ted Culotta <tculotta@...>
 

First, I have not yet checked the tank dimensions yet, so this is contingent upon those being workable. Second, for those of you who have seen "Fast Times at Ridgemont High" this all brings to mind the scene where Spiccoli (Sean Penn) totals Forrest Whittaker's car and says "My dad's a TV repair man. He has the ultimate set of tools. I can fix it." (the fact that Sean Penn and Forrest Whittaker were ever in something like this proves that everyone has to start somewhere, but that's a different topic.) Anyway, having completely stripped the car so that all of the parts are separated, I think "I can fix it". There are two main things to be done: file to inside of the ends of the tank to create a much finer flange and then build up the circumference of the tank ends to make up for this difference and to build an entirely new frame. The small task is then to add entirely new details such as brakes, hand holds, ladders, etc. However, I am up for the challenge!

Regards,
Ted Culotta

Speedwitch Media
100 14th Avenue, San Mateo, CA 94402
info@...
www.speedwitch.com
(650) 787-1912


Richard Hendrickson
 

Ted Culotta writes:

First, I have not yet checked the tank dimensions yet, so this is
contingent upon those being workable. Second, for those of you who
have seen "Fast Times at Ridgemont High" this all brings to mind the
scene where Spiccoli (Sean Penn) totals Forrest Whittaker's car and
says "My dad's a TV repair man. He has the ultimate set of tools. I
can fix it." (the fact that Sean Penn and Forrest Whittaker were ever
in something like this proves that everyone has to start somewhere, but
that's a different topic.) Anyway, having completely stripped the car
so that all of the parts are separated, I think "I can fix it". There
are two main things to be done: file to inside of the ends of the tank
to create a much finer flange and then build up the circumference of
the tank ends to make up for this difference and to build an entirely
new frame. The small task is then to add entirely new details such as
brakes, hand holds, ladders, etc. However, I am up for the challenge!
I don't doubt that you're up to the challenge, Ted, but the question is -
is it worth all that effort? Especially to rework a model that costs
upwards of $30 to start with? I haven't given up on the possibility of
getting another mfr. to produce really good models of these cars; I don't
consider the M/T models to be competitive in the North American market in
any realistic sense, since they are not only grotesquely inaccurate and
badly executed but also absurdly overpriced.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


Schuyler Larrabee
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Richard Hendrickson [mailto:rhendrickson@...]

I don't doubt that you're up to the challenge, Ted, but the
question is - is it worth all that effort? Especially to
rework a model that . . .

Richard,

Can't you see Ted's cheek pushed wayyyyyyyy out by his tongue?

8^)

SGL


Richard Hendrickson
 

I wrote, re Ted Culotta's post:

I don't doubt that you're up to the challenge, Ted, but the
question is - is it worth all that effort? Especially to
rework a model that . . .
To which Schuyler Larrabee responded:

Can't you see Ted's cheek pushed wayyyyyyyy out by his tongue?
Schuyler, I know Ted pretty well and I think he's serious.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


ed_mines
 

--- In STMFC@..., Richard Hendrickson
<rhendrickson@o...> wrote "....they are not only grotesquely
inaccurate and badly executed but also absurdly overpriced."

Other than that is there anything else wrong with them?

I wonder how many cars they have sold and how many they expected to
sell?

If a 1000 cars is a big resin run it's likely that we freight car
enthusiasts aren't going to keep T/M in business.

How many $30+ HO RTR freight cars are sold? I think they must be the
new brass - a few collectors buy a lot of the cars. I don't doubt
that there are a few men who have the built up IM cars and all of
the Kadee cars.

Ed


Brian Carlson
 

I hope Ted is serious, since I pre-ordered a set of these cars from my dealer since Trix was offering two of them in schemes from Niagara Falls, and I thought they would be really neat on the layout, providing local flavor. However based on the response so far I am sorry I pre-ordered them. I hope to pick mine up next week.

Ted, let us know how your modifications go.

Brian Carlson

Cheektowaga NY.



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Gene Green <lgreen@...>
 

I don't doubt that you're up to the challenge, Ted, but the
question is -
is it worth all that effort? Especially to rework a model that
costs
upwards of $30 to start with? I haven't given up on the
possibility of
getting another mfr. to produce really good models of these cars; I
don't
consider the M/T models to be competitive in the North American
market in
any realistic sense, since they are not only grotesquely inaccurate
and
badly executed but also absurdly overpriced.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520
The Märklin cars, being 3-rail, aren't really applicable to this list
but I predict that we'll see the Trix freight cars deeply discounted
in the future as distributors and dealers try to unload these dogs.
The Trix cars are overpriced and toy-like.

For my part I'm stuck with one last Trix Big-Boy I can't sell. (We
couldn't get Trix Big-Boys from Märklin in Germany so bought some
here in the US to ship back to Germany for resale. Couldn't sell all
of 'em there either.)

Gene Green


Ted Culotta <tculotta@...>
 

On Dec 25, 2004, at 2:16 PM, Richard Hendrickson wrote:

I wrote, re Ted Culotta's post:

>> I don't doubt that you're up to the challenge, Ted, but the
>> question is - is it worth all that effort?  Especially to
>> rework a model that . . .

To which Schuyler Larrabee responded:

>Can't you see Ted's cheek pushed wayyyyyyyy out by his tongue?

Schuyler, I know Ted pretty well and I think he's serious.
Richard is correct. I am entirely serious about fixing these. The
primary reason is because I expect that before I see them done in
styrene again, I'll be Richard's age. I am now approximately 30 years
his junior if that lends some perspective. I think that I will do the
underframe as a set of patterns so that others can use it as well.

Regards,
Ted Culotta

Speedwitch Media
100 14th Avenue, San Mateo, CA 94402
info@...
www.speedwitch.com
(650) 787-1912


Steve and Barb Hile
 

Ted wrote:

Richard is correct. I am entirely serious about fixing these. The
primary reason is because I expect that before I see them done in
styrene again, I'll be Richard's age. I am now approximately 30 years
his junior if that lends some perspective. I think that I will do the
underframe as a set of patterns so that others can use it as well.

Regards,
Ted Culotta

Just curious, because I have not yet seen the T/M cars, but would it be possible to mount this tank to the P2k Type 21 underframe or perhaps shorten the Intermountain Type 27 underframe to use this size tank? Would that result in something that matches any known prototype?

Steve Hile


Richard Hendrickson
 

From Steve Hile:

Just curious, because I have not yet seen the T/M cars, but would it be
possible to mount this tank to the P2k Type 21 underframe or perhaps
shorten the Intermountain Type 27 underframe to use this size tank? Would
that result in something that matches any known prototype?
The problem is that the 6K gal. cars had different underframes than can be
modeled with either the P2K Type 21 or Intermountain Type 27 underframes
(23'2-1/2" over truck centers, 35'10" over strikers in contrast to
25'8-1/4" and 36'3-3/4" for the Type 27 and 22'9" and 32'7" for the Type
21). So you would be looking at extensive underframe modifications in
addition to the shortcomings of the T/M tanks und tank details. Not to say
it couldn't be done but....

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


Gene Green <lgreen@...>
 

Neither the Intermountain nor the Proto 2000 tank car underframes are
that great as a starting point for an accurate ACF tank car
underframe. By the time one has brought the underframe up to 'our'
standards it would have been just as easy to alter a Trix or Athearn
underframe or scratchbuild one. Well, perhaps I've overstated my
case here...
Gene Green

--- In STMFC@..., Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@o...>
wrote:
From Steve Hile:

Just curious, because I have not yet seen the T/M cars, but would
it be
possible to mount this tank to the P2k Type 21 underframe or
perhaps
shorten the Intermountain Type 27 underframe to use this size
tank? Would
that result in something that matches any known prototype?
The problem is that the 6K gal. cars had different underframes than
can be
modeled with either the P2K Type 21 or Intermountain Type 27
underframes
(23'2-1/2" over truck centers, 35'10" over strikers in contrast to
25'8-1/4" and 36'3-3/4" for the Type 27 and 22'9" and 32'7" for the
Type
21). So you would be looking at extensive underframe modifications
in
addition to the shortcomings of the T/M tanks und tank details.
Not to say
it couldn't be done but....

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520