Buffalo Flour Re: Buffalo Creek Boxcars


Brian Carlson
 

Tim, actually I have a Bob's photo of DL&W 55203, built 3-57 Magor CC, in San Diego at a bakery in April 1957 one month after building. The car is stenciled "RETURN TO BUFFALO FOR FLOUR LOADING." apparently the Buffalo flour cars did get around. Buffalo was the grain milling capital of the world. I admit I don't understand the economics of shipping wheat east by boat the flour west, but it did happen.

The photo is also interesting in that it is the only time I have seen ditto marks used for stenciling.

Brian J carlson

Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:
Sam,

White flour powder from broken bags and spillage also could be the
explanation for this. Damage to a few bags probably was common in
those days of no cushioning. The seal around the door would always
be needed to keep out air, water and especially insects. Shipping
flour 3,000 miles seems highly unlikely -- most of the flour from
Buffalo was milled from wheat grown 1,000 miles to the west. The
BCK cars may have been "borrowed" (or leased) because they were
safe to use for flour. I'm just guessing about this, but spilled
flour is not proof of bulk loading.



We have several photos of BCK 40' PS-1 box cars with open doors showing
the remains of bulk loose white powder (assuming it's flour because of the
printing on the side of the car, see below) and special linings or a sort of
seal around the door openings. A couple of our BCK sources have mentioned
these BCK cars were running back and forth from Seattle, WA to the east
coast. Apparently, these cars were used as "hoppers" for flour like others
were used for grain until real hoppers became more available and popular.

The following info is printed at the left of the doors:

SPECIAL WEEVIL CONTROL CAR
DO NOT CONTAMINATE
RETURN EMPTY TO BUFFALO
FOR FLOUR RELOADING

Sam Clarke
Kadee Quality Products



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Garth Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Brian,

Not all wheat is the same thing, nor is flour just flour. Different grains and flours have specific qualities which makes them useful for certain products, and worthless for others. Seminola wheat, for example, makes the best pasta, but doesn't make very good bread (IIRC, it doesn't rise well). Special types wheat might be milled only in a few locations due to the need for special equipment (for example, some berries are much harder than others, or too much oil in the germ could clog regular milling machinery). Thus it is quite possible that some mills in Buffalo had a near-monopoly on milling and distributing certain flours that would be needed nationwide. Now California does (or did) raise and mill quite a bit of wheat, but it might not be suitable for the products made by that San Diego bakery.

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff

Brian Carlson wrote:

Tim, actually I have a Bob's photo of DL&W 55203, built 3-57 Magor CC, in San Diego at a bakery in April 1957 one month after building. The car is stenciled "RETURN TO BUFFALO FOR FLOUR LOADING." apparently the Buffalo flour cars did get around. Buffalo was the grain milling capital of the world. I admit I don't understand the economics of shipping wheat east by boat the flour west, but it did happen.
The photo is also interesting in that it is the only time I have seen ditto marks used for stenciling.

Brian J carlson


ljack70117@...
 

On Thursday, January 13, 2005, at 07:41 AM, Garth Groff wrote:


Brian,

Not all wheat is the same thing, nor is flour just flour. Different
grains and flours have specific qualities which makes them useful for
certain products, and worthless for others. Seminola wheat, for example,
makes the best pasta, but doesn't make very good bread (IIRC, it doesn't
rise well). Special types wheat might be milled only in a few locations
due to the need for special equipment (for example, some berries are
much harder than others, or too much oil in the germ could clog regular
milling machinery). Thus it is quite possible that some mills in Buffalo
had a near-monopoly on milling and distributing certain flours that
would be needed nationwide. Now California does (or did) raise and mill
quite a bit of wheat, but it might not be suitable for the products made
by that San Diego bakery.

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff
This is not intended to put some one down. I worked for International Milling Co as a Control Chemist. I would like to correct some miss conception about wheat and flour.
Flow is milled in 4 types. Patent, 1st clear, 2nd clear and red dog. Each type can differ with in its self a per type wheat used. Hard wheat does not require any different machinery than soft wheat. All are mild in the same mill. Where I worked we had two mills in the building. Also the oil in the germ stays in the germ. Also another misconception is bleached flow is bad for you is the fact Flour will bleach itself in 90 days.
Patten flout is the first flower off the mill. The wheat kernel is slightly broken. The some of the flour falls out with some bran and germ. This goes through the sifter. Then the flour goes to the grinder. The germ is a solid piece and goes on it's way to a collector.
There is a 2nd, 3rd and 4th breaks. Each break opens the kernel further and more of the flour falls out with more and more of the bran.
A flour is graded by the protein, ash and moisture content. That was my job to test for this. These are controlled by The type of wheat that is blended for the grind. Also how much of the flour you blend back into the first break from the 2nd, and 3rd breaks. The 4th break has so much bran it it it is always used in the Red Dog
Patent flour is used in baking cakes and some breads. 1st clear is used in beard flour and lesser products.
General purpose flour you get in the store is 1st clear. You can buy patent as cake flour.
2nd clear is always used for export flour.
Red Dog is sold to the animal feed market.
Flour does not come off the mill already ground. The flour is little hard pieces. Cream of wheat breakfast cereal is unground flour.
Wheat germ is very seldom ground and is mixed 50/50 with bran for the market.
I think I have covered things but any questions please contact me off list as this is OT and mike has been very good to us.
thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@...
When you go to court you are putting yourself in the hands of 12 people who were not smart enough to get out of jury duty.


Garth Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Larry,

Thanks for your excellent information. My milling information is based on reading about and researching older mills with stone wheels, which are not as forgiving as steel burrs. Germ oil certainly could clog the wheels if not properly adjusted, and indeed sometimes even caught fire. As for different hardnesses of wheat, it was the inability of local stone mills to grind them that prevented some types of wheat from being economically planted. More modern milling machinery, especially steel burrs, made milling this wheat possible and lead to an explosion of wheat production in the late 19th century midwest. It's been several years since I read about this, but I believe hard winter wheat (Turkey Red?) was one variety that had to wait until this problem was solved.

In any case, we're getting away from trains, and this is all I will say on this subject.

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff

ljack70117@... wrote:

On Thursday, January 13, 2005, at 07:41 AM, Garth Groff wrote:


Brian,

Not all wheat is the same thing, nor is flour just flour. Different
grains and flours have specific qualities which makes them useful for
certain products, and worthless for others. Seminola wheat, for example,
makes the best pasta, but doesn't make very good bread (IIRC, it doesn't
rise well). Special types wheat might be milled only in a few locations
due to the need for special equipment (for example, some berries are
much harder than others, or too much oil in the germ could clog regular
milling machinery). Thus it is quite possible that some mills in Buffalo
had a near-monopoly on milling and distributing certain flours that
would be needed nationwide. Now California does (or did) raise and mill
quite a bit of wheat, but it might not be suitable for the products made
by that San Diego bakery.

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff
This is not intended to put some one down. I worked for International Milling Co as a Control Chemist. I would like to correct some miss conception about wheat and flour.
Flow is milled in 4 types. Patent, 1st clear, 2nd clear and red dog. Each type can differ with in its self a per type wheat used. Hard wheat does not require any different machinery than soft wheat. All are mild in the same mill. Where I worked we had two mills in the building. Also the oil in the germ stays in the germ. Also another misconception is bleached flow is bad for you is the fact Flour will bleach itself in 90 days.
Patten flout is the first flower off the mill. The wheat kernel is slightly broken. The some of the flour falls out with some bran and germ. This goes through the sifter. Then the flour goes to the grinder. The germ is a solid piece and goes on it's way to a collector.
There is a 2nd, 3rd and 4th breaks. Each break opens the kernel further and more of the flour falls out with more and more of the bran.
A flour is graded by the protein, ash and moisture content. That was my job to test for this. These are controlled by The type of wheat that is blended for the grind. Also how much of the flour you blend back into the first break from the 2nd, and 3rd breaks. The 4th break has so much bran it it it is always used in the Red Dog
Patent flour is used in baking cakes and some breads. 1st clear is used in beard flour and lesser products.
General purpose flour you get in the store is 1st clear. You can buy patent as cake flour.
2nd clear is always used for export flour.
Red Dog is sold to the animal feed market.
Flour does not come off the mill already ground. The flour is little hard pieces. Cream of wheat breakfast cereal is unground flour.
Wheat germ is very seldom ground and is mixed 50/50 with bran for the market.
I think I have covered things but any questions please contact me off list as this is OT and mike has been very good to us.
thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@...
When you go to court you are putting yourself in the hands of 12 people who were not smart enough to get out of jury duty.