Open and Prepay Station Lists


Shawn Beckert
 

Bill McCoy wrote:

The open an prepay station list does not do any thing other than
identify stations, their location, station number and whether it is
an "open" ie. can receive colect and COD shipments and a station that
can only receice prepaid shipments.
Actually they do a bit more. While the first half of the book is laid
out as Bill describes (and makes for very dry reading), it's the back
half that is the most interesting. In the section titled "Explanation
Of Notes" you'll find an extensive listing of industries, along with
the railroads that they're switched by. The columns are arranged thus:

Location---------Railroad-------Industry Name---------Waybill Station

Note that locations are usually ones used in the railroad's employee
timetable; you won't find some of these on any map. The station named
in the right column is often NOT the actual location of the industry.
It's the "waybill" station, the point where the waybills accompanying
a shipment are to be sent for the local agent to process.

While the lists of stations in each annual edition of the "List" are
quite large, they are not a full and complete rundown of every industry
on a particular railroad. I haven't figured out why just yet. At the
moment I have the April, 1959 edition open on my desk at home while I
extract information on all the food and grocery businesses listed. Next
will be oil companies. That ought to take me a month or two...

Shawn Beckert


Andy Laurent <arlaurent@...>
 

The Official List of Open and Prepay Stations does not have any sort of comprehensive list industries and consignees. If you read the text at the heading of those lists in the "Explanation of Notes" section that Shawn mentioned, you will see that it is a list of stations that those rules apply to on a given railroad. Rules 34, 76, 99 and others have lengthy lists of industries because they are "common" car routing rules. Some railroads (the one I model - Ahnapee & Western) have no industries mentioned at all in the book. It is very hit and miss...

Andy

-------------------------------

Actually they do a bit more. While the first half of the book is laid
out as Bill describes (and makes for very dry reading), it's the back
half that is the most interesting. In the section titled "Explanation
Of Notes" you'll find an extensive listing of industries, along with
the railroads that they're switched by. The columns are arranged thus:

Location---------Railroad-------Industry Name---------Waybill Station

Note that locations are usually ones used in the railroad's employee
timetable; you won't find some of these on any map. The station named
in the right column is often NOT the actual location of the industry.
It's the "waybill" station, the point where the waybills accompanying
a shipment are to be sent for the local agent to process.

While the lists of stations in each annual edition of the "List" are
quite large, they are not a full and complete rundown of every industry
on a particular railroad. I haven't figured out why just yet. At the
moment I have the April, 1959 edition open on my desk at home while I
extract information on all the food and grocery businesses listed. Next
will be oil companies. That ought to take me a month or two...

Shawn Beckert



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