Champ decals


Rhbale@...
 

In a message dated 4/26/2005 11:43:30 AM Pacific Daylight Time,
ed_mines@yahoo.com writes:


I always thought Rich Meyer was an egomaniac....

I find your remarks about the late Rich Meyer to be inaccurate and entirely
inappropriate for this list. There is no shortage of egotists in model
railroading but over the years I have found more of it among modelers than
manufacturers.

Dick Bale


ed_mines
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Gatwood, Elden" <Elden.Gatwood@h...>
wrote The "Blue-Ribbon" SSW decals by Champ are correct, having the
white outline where it ought to be.

I guess the old song is right - "you don't know what you got 'til it's
gone".

I always thought Rich Meyer was an egomaniac but he kept Champ alive
with little pay back until he died. They kept on coming out with "new
and improved" sets too, frequently without much fanfare, years after
Walthers (and even Herald king) departed from ther decal business.

Ed


Gatwood, Elden <Elden.Gatwood@...>
 

Ed;
You are right, and the sad truth is that the Champ Circle Keystone sets
are by far the most accurate available for that scheme, and at some
point soon, unavailable. Bob Johnson helped revise many of the early
PRR sets, and they are literally all we have for some uses.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
ed_mines
Sent: Tuesday, April 26, 2005 11:41 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Champ decals



--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Gatwood, Elden" <Elden.Gatwood@h...>
wrote The "Blue-Ribbon" SSW decals by Champ are correct, having the
white outline where it ought to be.

I guess the old song is right - "you don't know what you got 'til it's
gone".

I always thought Rich Meyer was an egomaniac but he kept Champ alive
with little pay back until he died. They kept on coming out with "new
and improved" sets too, frequently without much fanfare, years after
Walthers (and even Herald king) departed from ther decal business.

Ed







Yahoo! Groups Links


Shawn Beckert
 

Elden wrote:

....the sad truth is that the Champ Circle Keystone sets are
by far the most accurate available for that scheme, and at some
point soon, unavailable. Bob Johnson helped revise many of the
early PRR sets, and they are literally all we have for some uses.
I've been buying Champ sets like crazy this past year, especially
where Micro Scale doesn't have something comparable. And now, with
the big goof-up in their Cotton Belt set, I'm going to look at every
Micro Scale set with suspicion until I can (hopefully) verify its
accuracy.

You say Champ's Circle Keystone decal set is correct. Is this set
usable for Pennsylvania cars in service during the late 1950's or
early 1960's? Might have to get me a few...

Shawn Beckert


proto48er
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Beckert, Shawn" <shawn.beckert@d...>
wrote:
Elden wrote:

....the sad truth is that the Champ Circle Keystone sets are
by far the most accurate available for that scheme . . .
Wow - I never thought I'd hear praises of Champ decals! In "O"
scale, the old sets were INTENTIONALLY made with incorrect lettering
in them. This was known as "Rand McNallying" (sp?). It was done
extensively by said map maker so that they would know if someone were
copying their product. Each of their maps would have two or three
errors in spelling of insignificantly small towns on them - the names
were misspelled phonetically so that users would not be too confused,
but R-McN would know if they were copied by someone!

The older Champ PRR sets had EVERY letter and number changed from the
prototype deliberately! Then Mr. Meyer would know that someone had
used his artwork!! Think about the damages involved - say 1,000
freight cars pad printed with his purloined artwork @ $1.00 per set
for decals versus never having confidence in the prototype fidelity
of ANY Champ artwork! It boggles the mind!

I was told this back in the late 1970's by Bill Clouser - I had not
noticed myself that EVERY letter had been changed by Champ - even
the "U" and "P" in the UP freight car set. It made me darn mad after
trying to achieve prototype fidelity on a model, only to find that I
had applied bogus decal lettering on it.

Rant off! It is true that later artwork and obscure roadname sets
were not worth Champ's time to re-draw every letter, so they may be
OK to use - just look at the prototype lettering and the Champ
lettering first - before you apply it - to make sure it is correct.
A.T. Kott


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Dick Bale wrote a reply to this:
I always thought Rich Meyer was an egomaniac....
I find your remarks about the late Rich Meyer to be inaccurate and entirely
inappropriate for this list. There is no shortage of egotists in model
railroading but over the years I have found more of it among modelers than
manufacturers.
I would agree with Dick on this, and would add that Rich may have been a little compulsive about some subjects (to discover other people with that problem, glance at your mirror), but I do not think his ego was nearly at the level of the remark made.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Thomas M. Olsen <tmolsen@...>
 

Eldon,

It is amazing how many people tell me that Champ is out of business and that Micro-Scale is the only one making PRR stuff. I only buy Micro-Scale when it is the last resort. Why pay $5-$6 for a sheet of decals with every possible variation of the lettering and herald schemes when you do not need 3/4's of the stuff or you have to buy sheet that have four or five roads on them when you do not need but one..

On top of that, Micro-Scale still thinks that PRR locomotive and passenger car lettering is "Yellow," rather than artificial gold. The term "Dulux Gold" more of a rail buff term (sort of like "friction bearings" and "armstrong interlocking machines") and does not show up in lettering diagrams. They have been advised of the errors and have been given lettering information many times over the last 20 years and they still disregard it. Perhaps, our new PRRT&HS modeling committee will make some progress in this area.

A lot of their decals do not have the clarity or register that Champ has. This was an area where Rich Meyer took great pains to keep up the quality. There was a time when I was lettering a observation car and had to open a new set of decals to replace a few letters that I had managed to screw up. The new set had a color shift in the artificial gold and were not the same. I called Rich and advised him of the change. It turned out that the ink supplier made an error in the formula and they had to go back and correct the ink, then reprint a large number of the passenger car sets. The important thing was that Champ corrected the problem, although I am sure that they took a fairly good hit in the bank account to do so.

It is true that a number of the Champ sets were not either correct or were incomplete, but Rich, before he died, was working with people from a number of the historical societies to make the corrections. When you have an inventory the size of Champ's, it takes an lot of time to overhaul the entire line. Unfortunately, Rich passed away before this project was complete.

Champ is also one of the few decal makers that carries a fairly good line of the lettering for the pre-1954 freight equipment. It is ironic that only a few years after a large number of those sets were discontinued, the hobby went through the information explosion which resulted in the coverage that we have now in the 1935-55 time period. If Rich had not been preparing for retirement and/or had not become ill, he probably would have begun to revise and reissue many of the discontinued freight sets.

In the meantime, Connie and Kim have at least at 3-5 year supply of decals on hand and their on-line catalog is continuously updated as to what is currently available. Here is the link:

http://www.minot.com/~champ/

Regards,

Tom Olsen
7 boundary Road, West Branch
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292
tmolsen@udel.edu

Gatwood, Elden wrote:

Ed;
You are right, and the sad truth is that the Champ Circle Keystone sets
are by far the most accurate available for that scheme, and at some
point soon, unavailable. Bob Johnson helped revise many of the early
PRR sets, and they are literally all we have for some uses.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
ed_mines
Sent: Tuesday, April 26, 2005 11:41 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Champ decals



--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Gatwood, Elden" <Elden.Gatwood@h...> wrote The "Blue-Ribbon" SSW decals by Champ are correct, having the white outline where it ought to be.
I guess the old song is right - "you don't know what you got 'til it's gone".
I always thought Rich Meyer was an egomaniac but he kept Champ alive with little pay back until he died. They kept on coming out with "new and improved" sets too, frequently without much fanfare, years after Walthers (and even Herald king) departed from ther decal business.

Ed





Yahoo! Groups Links









Yahoo! Groups Links






Thomas M. Olsen <tmolsen@...>
 

Rich always had strong opinions about some subjects, but he was not
alone in that category. He was not the only person in the manufacturing
field that did, and there are times when it takes an attitude to get
things done. After all, if we agreed on everything, we would still be
shaking the box to put kits together! I am sure that we do not want to
regress to that period again.

Tom Olsen
Newark, Delaware

Rhbale@aol.com wrote:

In a message dated 4/26/2005 11:43:30 AM Pacific Daylight Time,
ed_mines@yahoo.com writes:



I always thought Rich Meyer was an egomaniac....


I find your remarks about the late Rich Meyer to be inaccurate and entirely
inappropriate for this list. There is no shortage of egotists in model
railroading but over the years I have found more of it among modelers than
manufacturers.

Dick Bale










Yahoo! Groups Links








Charlie Vlk
 

Tom-

In this you are not correct.

I am looking at a typical Styling and Painting drawing (for a B&O EMD E-7A)
and the color is called out as
"95-014 Dupont Imit. Dulux Gold" and this is typical official terminology
for builder and railroad lettering and painting diagrams.
Also, the correct color for PRR locomotive and passenger car lettering is
either Metallic Gold or PRR Synthetic Buff Lettering
Color Enamel Ref. No. 47-3294 depending on the era.

"Armstrong interlocking machines" is a term that was used on the
railroads..... just like "Pistol Grip interlocking machine". I know several
people that were tower operators in the Chicago area and they use those
terms. I'm not so sure about "friction bearings" and would probably lean
in the direction of their being called "plain bearings" after the widespread
use of roller bearings, but I wouldn't rule it out.....many of our magazines
and authors had strong prototype connections and they normally didn't just
make up terminology out of the thin air. And just because the term wasn't
in use in a part of one railroad doesn't mean that professional railroaders
elsewhere on the same road or others did not use it.

Addressing the general tone of this thread, I don't understand the
belligerence displayed on this list and others towards companies that make
sincere (if sometimes imperfect) efforts to get things right....MicroScale
has a long track record of doing so. Also, while we may wish that Champ
Decals and Rich Meyer had done things differently (computerizing,
updating/issuing more sets, and my favorite, doing N Scale sets....and most
of all not dying) it was his business and his decision..at least for all but
the last issue......and he did enough things right to have made a living in
the middle of North Dakota for decades and most of us are very grateful for
his contributions to the hobby.

Perhaps those that see a business opportunity will step forward and do a
service for all of us by using their talents and resources to provide more
and better products from their full-time companies.

Charlie Vlk
Railroad Model Resources

On top of that, Micro-Scale still thinks that PRR locomotive and
passenger car lettering is "Yellow," rather than artificial gold. The
term "Dulux Gold" more of a rail buff term (sort of like "friction
bearings" and "armstrong interlocking machines") and does not show up in
lettering diagrams. They have been advised of the errors and have been
given lettering information many times over the last 20 years and they
still disregard it. Perhaps, our new PRRT&HS modeling committee will
make some progress in this area.


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Thomas M. Olsen wrote:
On top of that, Micro-Scale still thinks that PRR locomotive and
passenger car lettering is "Yellow," rather than artificial gold. The
term "Dulux Gold" more of a rail buff term (sort of like "friction
bearings" and "armstrong interlocking machines") and does not show up in
lettering diagrams.
Tom, I think you're wrong about this. First of all, "Dulux" was a whole line of DuPont paint, and there are many Dulux colors, not just the gold. Secondly, I have an SP passenger car diagram which does in fact specify DuPont Imitation Gold Dulux.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Charlie Vlk wrote:
Addressing the general tone of this thread, I don't understand the
belligerence displayed on this list and others towards companies that make
sincere (if sometimes imperfect) efforts to get things right....MicroScale
has a long track record of doing so.
My respect for MicroScale has never recovered from them being given a meticulously hand-drawn set of ink-on-vellum drawings of Western Pacific freight car lettering (some of you know who did this work), and MicroScale proceeded to use a standard computer font instead. When the draftsman complained, they said "no one will notice."
Was that part of the track record you allude to, Charlie?

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Thomas Baker
 

Although I model in S scale, I sometimes use HO scale Champ decals, especially in the case of dimensional data and sometimes even in the case or road name sets. If the size of dimensional data on Gold Coast Models box cars is accurate, then the Champ dimensional data sets come very close to the pad-printed data.

In any case, I have found the sets to be accurate, at least as far as I am able to determine. On one occasion, I used a D&H road name set for a kitbashed box car I had been working on. The Champ set was very accurate and had exactly the emblem--"one hundred years of anthracite service"--that I needed.

As to the late Rich Meyer, I inquired about using a few of his decals as a template for screen printing on undecorated box cars. I did not follow through with the project, but his charges for such a use were very reasonable. I have positive memories of him.

Tom


Charlie Vlk
 

Tony-
I know that MicroScale has worked with a number of people in some RR
historical societies and has produced revised sets that are very accurate
because of it.
MicroScale has had different people working for it over the years. When I
worked at Kato we were using MicroScale for some artwork and Craig Holmberg
and I came to the conclusion that we would be better off doing our own
artwork from scratch rather than correcting the errors on what they were
supplying us at that time...... So maybe your experience was with the same
draftsman we had problems with.
While creating a new font from scans of artwork is a great deal of work,
especially for freight car lettering where most all of the characters have
to be traced/created, it is, I agree, important. Even if you have custom
art in the computer you have to check against photos..... the stenciling on
cars and locomotives can vary from order to order, builder to builder, and
shop to shop on equipment of the same vintage. It doesn't always follow the
railroad standards either, as I am sure you know.
If you look at the decal sets from Walthers, Champ, and MicroScale across
their entire lines I would guess that overall the MicroScale would prove to
be the most accurate. Many Walthers and Champ sets used typeset or standard
fonts. Champ never did get all of any one set for CB&Q correct.... but I
guess some of the later reworked and new sets were pretty good. Walthers
sets were pretty rough in general. Don't recall comments about the accuracy
of Herald King but as they did stuff that nobody else had they were well
received.....
Of course, small guys with direct knowledge of and source material for the
road that they are doing the sets now in this age of more and better
availability of information and increased expectations in the market should
be able to produce more accurate decals than a large company trying to
satisfy the broad market where a person is cranking out sets for a FEC
SD40-2 one day and a SP Cab Forwards the next.....
If someone wants to make a statement that MicroScale uses the same Dulux
Gold color for PRR passenger cars and it should be "Glidden No.4425
Imitation Gold", which is a much darker shade.... I have no problem with
that (and that is an entirely different message than saying
"Dulux Gold" is a made-up Model Railroad term).... and if the PRRT&HS
Modeling Committee or an independent expert doesn't send MicroScale a packet
of drift cars with the correct color, talk to the recipient before and after
the package is sent to make sure they are sending it to the right person and
that person understands why they are getting it and agrees to do something
about it on the next production run it is a little tiresome to hear the
carping about the evils of MicroScale.
Walthers is gone, Herald King is gone, Champ is fading. Do people want to
see MicroScale depart and leave Model Railroad Decals to the basement guys
that have ALPS machines or use Rail Graphics for limited availability sets?
I don't think so.
What is the point of the public whippings????
Charlie Vlk
Railroad Model Resources


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Charlie Vlk wrote:
What is the point of the public whippings????
I don't disagree with most of what you said, Charlie, but on this last point (above), It's to "help" those at Microscale or wherever who, when asked about accuracy, say things along the line of "no one will notice."

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Shawn Beckert asked:
"You say Champ's Circle Keystone decal set is correct. Is this set
usable for Pennsylvania cars in service during the late 1950's or
early 1960's? Might have to get me a few..."

The following PRR decal sets were revised in the late 1980s and early
1990s with the assistance of Bob Johnson, PRRT&HS Archives Chairman
(revision date in parentheses):

PRR Freight Car Sets
HB-30N - Box car, 50 ft, circle keystone (4-21-92)
HB-40 - Box car, 40 ft, outside braced, circle keystone (7-28-92)
HB-155A - X29 Box Car, Merchandise Service (2-19-97) (Upgraded set
may not have been printed)
HB-303N - Box car, 40 ft, circle keystone (4-21-92)
HB-307N - Box car, 40 ft, shadow keystone (10-23-95)
HC-47N - Twin hopper, 7-rib, circle keystone (11-11-89)
HC-70N - Covered hopper, circle keystone (9-7-93)
HC-79 - Quad hopper, shadow keystone (2-2-84)
HC-97 - Flat car, 40 ft or 50 ft, old style (4-23-90)
HC-115 - Stock car, circle keystone (7-28-92)
HC-120N - M of W, circle keystone, black (9-7-93)
HC-121N - Cabin car, shadow keystone (9-19-90)
HC-128 - M of W, circle keystone, white (9-7-93)
HC-179N - Quad hopper, circle keystone (3-9-92)
HC-180N - Quad or triple hopper, 7" PRR and number, 1957-1962 (4-1-96)
HC-210 - N8 cabin car, circle keystone (3-8-90)
HC-221N - Cabin car, circle keystone (3-8-90)
HC-280 - Wrecking Cranes (12-21-93)
HC-321 - Cabin car, plain keystone (9-19-90)
HC-444 - Twin hopper, 9-rib, circle keystone (11-11-89)
HG-108 - Gondola, long, shadow keystone (9-8-98) (Upgraded set may
not have been printed)
HG-148 - Gondola, long, circle keystone (4-19-93)
HG-150 - Gondola, short, circle keystone (4-19-93)
HN-80N - Road name, circle keystone, white (12-2-93)
HN-90N - Road name, circle keystone, black (12-2-93)
HT-58N - Tank car (12-21-93)

In Bob's words, "are the above sets perfect? No, a few glitches
snuck in here and there, but the sets are (or at least were) equal to
or better than anything else I saw on the market, including sets
included in expensive kits - no names here. The graphics produced by
Champ were as perfect as I was able to measure in 1/2" scale under
strong magnification. However, the printing process introduced a
small amount of error due to surface tension and viscosity of the
ink. Still, letter size and line weight were far superior to most
other forms of lettering, be it other decals, dry transfers or pad
printing on kits."

All of the above sets are still available from Champ.

To answer Shawn's question about longevity of the CK scheme, the
changeover to Shadow Keystone occurred in February 1954 with the
delivery of the 20 Class X48 PS-1s. However, many cars survived in
increasingly ratty CK schemes into the 1960s. The three Morning Sun
PRR Color Guides have many 1960s photos of cars in CK showing some
very interesting weathering patterns.


Ben Hom


tmolsen <tmolsen@...>
 

I have to attest to the ratty CK paint schemes, some as late as the
early 70's. As far as weathering patterns are concerned, I have a slide
of an X29D at Lewistown Pa. in the summer of 1973 with the freight car
color having weathered out to a very "pink" shade along with the washed
out white lettering.

Tom Olsen
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479


benjaminfrank_hom wrote:


Shawn Beckert asked:
"You say Champ's Circle Keystone decal set is correct. Is this set
usable for Pennsylvania cars in service during the late 1950's or
early 1960's? Might have to get me a few..."

The following PRR decal sets were revised in the late 1980s and early
1990s with the assistance of Bob Johnson, PRRT&HS Archives Chairman
(revision date in parentheses):

PRR Freight Car Sets
HB-30N - Box car, 50 ft, circle keystone (4-21-92)
HB-40 - Box car, 40 ft, outside braced, circle keystone (7-28-92)
HB-155A - X29 Box Car, Merchandise Service (2-19-97) (Upgraded set
may not have been printed)
HB-303N - Box car, 40 ft, circle keystone (4-21-92)
HB-307N - Box car, 40 ft, shadow keystone (10-23-95)
HC-47N - Twin hopper, 7-rib, circle keystone (11-11-89)
HC-70N - Covered hopper, circle keystone (9-7-93)
HC-79 - Quad hopper, shadow keystone (2-2-84)
HC-97 - Flat car, 40 ft or 50 ft, old style (4-23-90)
HC-115 - Stock car, circle keystone (7-28-92)
HC-120N - M of W, circle keystone, black (9-7-93)
HC-121N - Cabin car, shadow keystone (9-19-90)
HC-128 - M of W, circle keystone, white (9-7-93)
HC-179N - Quad hopper, circle keystone (3-9-92)
HC-180N - Quad or triple hopper, 7" PRR and number, 1957-1962 (4-1-96)
HC-210 - N8 cabin car, circle keystone (3-8-90)
HC-221N - Cabin car, circle keystone (3-8-90)
HC-280 - Wrecking Cranes (12-21-93)
HC-321 - Cabin car, plain keystone (9-19-90)
HC-444 - Twin hopper, 9-rib, circle keystone (11-11-89)
HG-108 - Gondola, long, shadow keystone (9-8-98) (Upgraded set may
not have been printed)
HG-148 - Gondola, long, circle keystone (4-19-93)
HG-150 - Gondola, short, circle keystone (4-19-93)
HN-80N - Road name, circle keystone, white (12-2-93)
HN-90N - Road name, circle keystone, black (12-2-93)
HT-58N - Tank car (12-21-93)

In Bob's words, "are the above sets perfect? No, a few glitches
snuck in here and there, but the sets are (or at least were) equal to
or better than anything else I saw on the market, including sets
included in expensive kits - no names here. The graphics produced by
Champ were as perfect as I was able to measure in 1/2" scale under
strong magnification. However, the printing process introduced a
small amount of error due to surface tension and viscosity of the
ink. Still, letter size and line weight were far superior to most
other forms of lettering, be it other decals, dry transfers or pad
printing on kits."

All of the above sets are still available from Champ.

To answer Shawn's question about longevity of the CK scheme, the
changeover to Shadow Keystone occurred in February 1954 with the
delivery of the 20 Class X48 PS-1s. However, many cars survived in
increasingly ratty CK schemes into the 1960s. The three Morning Sun
PRR Color Guides have many 1960s photos of cars in CK showing some
very interesting weathering patterns.

Ben Hom



Yahoo! Groups Links




Shawn Beckert
 

Ben Hom wrote:

To answer Shawn's question about longevity of the CK scheme, the
changeover to Shadow Keystone occurred in February 1954 with the
delivery of the 20 Class X48 PS-1s. However, many cars survived in
increasingly ratty CK schemes into the 1960s. The three Morning Sun
PRR Color Guides have many 1960s photos of cars in CK showing some
very interesting weathering patterns.
Ben,

Thanks for the information. Looks like the majority of my PRR models
should be wearing Shadow Keystone. I think I'll do just two or three
cars (maybe my G22's) in the Circle Keystone scheme, and weather the
you-know-what out of them.

Shawn Beckert


Gatwood, Elden <Elden.Gatwood@...>
 

Shawn;
Ben is right on.

There may be some additional information on what schemes were present,
and in what eras, in some of the TKM articles. Plus, certain types of
cars got repainted more often than others. 65' gons kept their circle
keys for a very long time, perhaps because the service they were in was
more kind to the carbody than that of the shorter general service gons.
Flat cars (although few had the monogram) also kept their original paint
a long time, so those schemes would be good through the 60's, in some
cases. Boxcars tended to get repainted more frequently, but there were
still a lot of them that made it to the merger in CK lettering. Ditto
for covered hoppers; the H33s kept their CK into the 60's. Open hoppers
were repainted pretty rapidly, and there were VERY few CK-lettered open
hoppers by the late 50's.

I wonder if other RRs had this same experience?

Oh, by the late 50's, the G22s were getting less numerous (being built
in the teens and being kind of small). You might consider some other
PRR gons for your fleet, as some of the later ones were far more common
by then.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Beckert, Shawn
Sent: Tuesday, May 03, 2005 11:53 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Champ decals

Ben Hom wrote:

To answer Shawn's question about longevity of the CK scheme, the
changeover to Shadow Keystone occurred in February 1954 with the
delivery of the 20 Class X48 PS-1s. However, many cars survived in
increasingly ratty CK schemes into the 1960s. The three Morning Sun
PRR Color Guides have many 1960s photos of cars in CK showing some
very interesting weathering patterns.
Ben,

Thanks for the information. Looks like the majority of my PRR models
should be wearing Shadow Keystone. I think I'll do just two or three
cars (maybe my G22's) in the Circle Keystone scheme, and weather the
you-know-what out of them.

Shawn Beckert




Yahoo! Groups Links