Alburgh Trestle - 1920's-1950's Penmanship in Conductor and Yard Reports


Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

englishintroy wrote:

--- In STMFC@..., "al_brown03" <abrown@f...> wrote:
I'm suspecting someone on CP was
using "M" as shorthand for "(B&)M", and I'm wondering further if
anyone on the Rutland might've done likewise.
It 's entirely possible that CP employees did so, but I don't recall
seeing such behavior in all the Rutland documents I've studied. "C"
for NYC and "P" for PRR is nearly universal; the notation for CB&Q
looks more like "CB2". It appears that they made no effort to ensure
diffferentiation between SOO and SOU, etc.
There were many "local" abbreviations of reporting marks: - the "C" and "P" for the NYC and PRR on the Rutland, but not on the CP in Vermont; the "M" for the B&M on the CP in Vermont, but not on the Rutland.

The "CB2" reference for the "CBQ" is perfectly understandable because kids in school were taught to write in script the capital of the letter "Q" - it looked like a "two" - at least I was taught that way in New Canaan CT around 1950. I suppose most mid-western roads abbreviated the CB&Q to "Q" (or "2").

On the UP, "Rd" was an abbreviation of SFRD which could easily be confused with "RI" - a capital "I" could look like a small case "d".

Some of the Conductors' "M's" and "N's" looked like "W's," - something which can be confusing except my mother's handwriting was very much like that - penmanship taught in the 1920's? "M's" and "N's" could also be misinterpreted whereby "MoP" could be confused with "NoP", or vice versa.

The difference between SOO and SOU was dependent upon how thoroughly the yard clerk or conductor closed the third letter. I doubt that problem was ever solved until the computer arrived, or the SOO and SOU disappeared into the CP and NS.

No doubt there were other whims of penmanship.

Hope this helps from somebody whose handwriting is virtually indecipherable, Tim Gilbert


Richard Hendrickson
 

On Jul 18, 2005, at 4:50 AM, Tim Gilbert wrote:

There were many "local" abbreviations of reporting marks: - the "C" and
"P" for the NYC and PRR on the Rutland, but not on the CP in Vermont;
the "M" for the B&M on the CP in Vermont, but not on the Rutland.

The "CB2" reference for the "CBQ" is perfectly understandable because
kids in school were taught to write in script the capital of the letter
"Q" - it looked like a "two" - at least I was taught that way in New
Canaan CT around 1950. I suppose most mid-western roads abbreviated the
CB&Q to "Q" (or "2").

On the UP, "Rd" was an abbreviation of SFRD which could easily be
confused with "RI" - a capital "I" could look like a small case "d".
I'll add that on the Santa Fe the common abbreviation was "AT," not "SF," and I know that this practice was followed on other RRs as well.

Richard Hendrickson