Wood Swift Reefers


Paul Hillman
 

I finally got around to getting more of my RR things out of storage. I
found that I still have 2 plastic, HO, Life Like, Swift wood reefers
that must be about 20+ years old. They are marked on the underbody
floor, "Life Like - Hong Kong". I didn't know that we were doing
plastic "China" things back that far, except for Oriental brass
engines & cars??

The cars are about 38 ft, marked "SRLX", #1020, and car-type "RP104".
CU FT 1750. They are white with red lettering. No build date.

What is a good book on wood Swift reefers? Maybe I can kit-bash these
cars into an accurate Swift reefer?? -or another prototype??

I only remember seeing red Swift reefers. Did they do white on certain
years/classes?

Paul Hillman


Doug Brown <brown194@...>
 

This is the old Varney car. These cars go back to the mid-50s. The
earliest Life-Like Varney cars had body-mounted couplers like the Varney
ones. Later they changed to Talgo truck-mounted couplers.

Doug Brown

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
behillman
Sent: Wednesday, July 20, 2005 7:07 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Wood Swift Reefers

I finally got around to getting more of my RR things out of storage. I
found that I still have 2 plastic, HO, Life Like, Swift wood reefers
that must be about 20+ years old. They are marked on the underbody
floor, "Life Like - Hong Kong". I didn't know that we were doing
plastic "China" things back that far, except for Oriental brass
engines & cars??

The cars are about 38 ft, marked "SRLX", #1020, and car-type "RP104".
CU FT 1750. They are white with red lettering. No build date.


William Keene <wakeene@...>
 

Paul,

I can't say about the wood reefers... but the steel (50ft or so) swift
mechanical reefers of 1954-56-built date were painted in Aluminum or a
silver gray with red trademark. At least the one that I washed and
cleaned in the late 70s was painted that way.

-- Bill Keene


On Jul 20, 2005, at 5:07 PM, behillman wrote:

I finally got around to getting more of my RR things out of storage. I
found that I still have 2 plastic, HO, Life Like, Swift wood reefers
that must be about 20+ years old. They are marked on the underbody
floor, "Life Like - Hong Kong". I didn't know that we were doing
plastic "China" things back that far, except for Oriental brass
engines & cars??

The cars are about 38 ft, marked "SRLX", #1020, and car-type "RP104".
CU FT 1750. They are white with red lettering. No build date.

What is a good book on wood Swift reefers? Maybe I can kit-bash these
cars into an accurate Swift reefer?? -or another prototype??

I only remember seeing red Swift reefers. Did they do white on certain
years/classes?

Paul Hillman




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Service.


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...>
 

Paul Hillman asked:
"I finally got around to getting more of my RR things out of storage. I
found that I still have 2 plastic, HO, Life Like, Swift wood reefers
that must be about 20+ years old. They are marked on the underbody
floor, "Life Like - Hong Kong". I didn't know that we were doing
plastic "China" things back that far, except for Oriental brass
engines & cars??

The cars are about 38 ft, marked "SRLX", #1020, and car-type "RP104".
CU FT 1750. They are white with red lettering. No build date."

As Doug posted, the tooling is ex-Varney. This car is still on the market
in Life-Like's toy line, though retooled with a separate "generic"
underframe; both models are common at swap meets or on eBay.


"What is a good book on wood Swift reefers? Maybe I can kit-bash these
cars into an accurate Swift reefer?? -or another prototype??"

John Nehrich kitbashed these cars into Armour and Swift reefers during the
late 1980s. See "Here's the beef - HO meat reefers from a Life-Like car",
Model Railroader, August 1987, p 52. For more prototype info, see also
Martin Lofton's "Swift's Reefer, Tank & Stock cars from Life-Like, Walthers
& Sunshine Kits", Railmodel Journal, February 1993, p 26.

Better kits for meat reefers are available from Sunshine and Funaro, but if
you haven't broken the ice on kit conversions yet, this is a "guilt free"
project as you don't lose anything if you ruin the models.


"I only remember seeing red Swift reefers. Did they do white on certain
years/classes?"

Not on wood sheathed cars.


Ben Hom


Paul Hillman
 

Ben Hom wrote,

"This car is still on the market in Life-Like's toy line, though retooled with a separate 'generic'
underframe; both models are common at swap meets or on eBay."

Quite interesting since I'd thought that these cars might have been a long-outdated "toy-type" car!

"John Nehrich kitbashed these cars into Armour and Swift reefers during the
late 1980s. See 'Here's the beef - HO meat reefers from a Life-Like car',
Model Railroader, August 1987, p 52."

I think I might have that issue. Now that I can sort through my MR & other mags, I'll seek for it.

"Better kits for meat reefers are available from Sunshine and Funaro, but if
you haven't broken the ice on kit conversions yet, this is a "guilt free"
project as you don't lose anything if you ruin the models."

What I don't understand here Ben is, how can I be "guilt free" if I destroy the models? (Except for in a fit of rage because some parts don't fit or something???) Do Sunshine & Funaro both supply an infinite quantity of replacement parts for grossly inept modelers??
**************************************************************************************

Paul Hillman


pullmanboss <tgmadden@...>
 

Ben Hom wrote:
"Better kits for meat reefers are available from Sunshine and
Funaro, but if
you haven't broken the ice on kit conversions yet, this is a "guilt
free"
project as you don't lose anything if you ruin the models."
And Paul Hillman responded:
What I don't understand here Ben is, how can I be "guilt free" if I
destroy the models? (Except for in a fit of rage because some parts
don't fit or something???) Do Sunshine & Funaro both supply an
infinite quantity of replacement parts for grossly inept modelers??

I'm sure Ben was referring to the Life-Like car as the "guilt free"
model on which to practice your kitbashing. What I don't understand is
why anyone would want to acquire "replacement parts for inept
modelers".

Tom "ept, I hope, but could use some new eyes" Madden


Scott Pitzer
 

Paul,
Ben means if you try to upgrade your Life-Likes, and you botch it, there's nothing lost.
I used that Nehrich article soon after it was published. The finished car (late 1940s yellow sides, red-brown roof and ends, rectangular white-on-red logo) is kinda neat. I haven't gotten around to a resin Swift car, even though my paternal grandfather worked for them long ago.

Scott Pitzer
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

-----Original Message-----
From: Paul Hillman <chris_hillman@msn.com>
What I don't understand here Ben is, how can I be "guilt free" if I destroy the models? (Except for in a fit of rage because some parts don't fit or something???) Do Sunshine & Funaro both supply an infinite quantity of replacement parts for grossly inept modelers??
**************************************************************************************

Paul Hillman


Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...>
 

Paul Hillman wrote:
"What I don't understand here Ben is, how can I be "guilt free" if I destroy
the models? (Except for in a fit of rage because some parts don't fit or
something???)"

Because a killer mistake only costs you a model that costs $1-$5 at your
local hobby shop or swap meet, instead of $15-$25 for an advanced styrene
kit or $12-$50 for a resin kit. Consider it a low-cost way to improve your
skills.


"Do Sunshine & Funaro both supply an infinite quantity of replacement parts
for grossly inept modelers??"

Westerfield definitely does for 99% of his parts (no Carmer cut levers!);
Sunshine and Funaro do if you're willing to wait a real long time.


Ben Hom


Ted Culotta <tculotta@...>
 

On Jul 21, 2005, at 6:32 AM, Benjamin Hom wrote:

Paul Hillman wrote:
"What I don't understand here Ben is, how can I be "guilt free" if I destroy
the models? (Except for in a fit of rage because some parts don't fit or
something???)"

Because a killer mistake only costs you a model that costs $1-$5 at your
local hobby shop or swap meet, instead of $15-$25 for an advanced styrene
kit or $12-$50 for a resin kit. Consider it a low-cost way to improve your
skills.
I am sure that Tony Thompson and/or Larry Kline can relate the horrified looks and gasps they received in a class they taught (local community college) where they (gasp!) cut up Athearn shells to make new models. I think one of the biggest impediments to modeling (as opposed to model railroading which in most circumstances involves little to no modeling since most model railroaders are not acutally modelers, but screwer-togetherers and even that is a dying breed) is the "analysis-paralysis" dilemma whereby one tries to come up with the most foolproof method of tackling a project before commencing. Unfortunately, the closets, basements, etc. of America are full of such uncommenced efforts. Just do it. It takes a few broken Athearn shells to make an omelette.

Regards,
Ted Culotta

Speedwitch Media
645 Tanner Marsh Road, Guilford, CT 06437
info@speedwitch.com
www.speedwitch.com
(650) 787-1912


Paul Hillman
 

Ben Hom wrote:

"Because a killer mistake only costs you a model that costs $1-$5 at your
local hobby shop or swap meet, instead of $15-$25 for an advanced styrene
kit or $12-$50 for a resin kit. Consider it a low-cost way to improve your
skills."

I got ya' now. Somehow I was misunderstanding about destroying a resin or expensive kit.

Actually I enjoy doing those kind of kitbashings and salvaging old cars into scale masterpieces. I've always admired John Nehrich's work and articles. My start in model railroading, in the '50's, was heavily into scratch & kit building anyway, back when that was pretty much the norm for the hobby. If things get TOO much out of control though, I'll always have another model to set on my scale RIP track, or scale scrap-yard.

Thanks for all the info.

Paul Hillman


cvsne <mjmcguirk@...>
 

"Life Like - Hong Kong". I didn't know that we were doing
plastic "China" things back that far, except for Oriental brass
engines & cars??

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

A lot of model railroaders are genuinely suprised when they learn the
first US model railroad manufacturer to do extensive business in Asia
(for other than brass) was Athearn -- they were Sanda Kan's first US
customer for model train products back in the 1950s. At that point,
the SDK was still in Taiwan, as the founder had escaped from mainland
China.

That individual (who is a wonderful, highly regarded gentleman)
eventually moved to the US and settled near Baltimore . . . he has
had a long term business and personal relationship with the principal
at Life-Like until they both retired a few years ago.

Sanda Kan is one of the larger Chinese companies, and it is today
owned (primarily) by other US (non model railroad related) investment
firms . . .


So, no, not surprised at all to see Life-Like Hong Kong from 20+
years ago -- if you look hard enough you'll likely find "Life-Like
Taiwan" as well.

Marty McGuirk


cvsne <mjmcguirk@...>
 

John Nehrich kitbashed these cars into Armour and Swift reefers
during the
late 1980s. See "Here's the beef - HO meat reefers from a Life-
Like car",
Model Railroader, August 1987, p 52.
Although I'm sure that issue is out of print, I believe the article
was republished in a Kalmbach book on modeling freight cars a few
years ago. Same book inlcudes Andy Sperandeo's article on detailing
Athearn's old ATSF caboose.

I also did a lot of that kind of "stuff" back then in the "dark days"
of the 1970s and 80s -- I remember kitbashing a TMI "Outside braced"
(that's what it said on the box, and I never figured out what it
really was . . . don't really care now!) boxcar into a CV 40000-
series car. Meant building new ends, roof, doors, and underframe, and
adding individual details to the sides.) I've built better since, but
I treasure that model.

Although I'm thankful every day for the likes of Westerfield,
Sunshine, IRC, RC, P2K, Branchline, etc . . . sometimes I miss
the "good old days . . ." but not TOO much .
Marty McGuirk


bierglaeser <bierglaeser@...>
 

Ah, "analysis-paralysis", eh? I knew I had a problem but I didn't
know it had a name. Are there any self-help groups?

Gene Green

<snip> I think one of the biggest impediments to modeling (as
opposed
to model railroading which in most circumstances involves little to
no
modeling since most model railroaders are not acutally modelers,
but
screwer-togetherers and even that is a dying breed) is the
"analysis-paralysis" dilemma whereby one tries to come up with the
most
foolproof method of tackling a project before commencing.
Unfortunately, the closets, basements, etc. of America are full of
such
uncommenced efforts. Just do it. It takes a few broken Athearn
shells
to make an omelette.

Regards,
Ted Culotta


armprem
 

Ah yes.I just discovered my yet to be completed Swift reefer kit bash in
my "junk box".I am afraid that model will never get trucks or
couplers.Armand premo

----- Original Message -----
From: "cvsne" <mjmcguirk@cox.net>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, July 21, 2005 9:31 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Wood Swift Reefers


John Nehrich kitbashed these cars into Armour and Swift reefers
during the
late 1980s. See "Here's the beef - HO meat reefers from a Life-
Like car",
Model Railroader, August 1987, p 52.
Although I'm sure that issue is out of print, I believe the article
was republished in a Kalmbach book on modeling freight cars a few
years ago. Same book inlcudes Andy Sperandeo's article on detailing
Athearn's old ATSF caboose.

I also did a lot of that kind of "stuff" back then in the "dark days"
of the 1970s and 80s -- I remember kitbashing a TMI "Outside braced"
(that's what it said on the box, and I never figured out what it
really was . . . don't really care now!) boxcar into a CV 40000-
series car. Meant building new ends, roof, doors, and underframe, and
adding individual details to the sides.) I've built better since, but
I treasure that model.

Although I'm thankful every day for the likes of Westerfield,
Sunshine, IRC, RC, P2K, Branchline, etc . . . sometimes I miss
the "good old days . . ." but not TOO much .
Marty McGuirk








Yahoo! Groups Links








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No virus found in this incoming message.
Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
Version: 7.0.323 / Virus Database: 267.9.2/54 - Release Date: 7/21/05


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Ted Culotta wrote:
I am sure that Tony Thompson and/or Larry Kline can relate the
horrified looks and gasps they received in a class they taught (local
community college) where they (gasp!) cut up Athearn shells to make new
models.
This was a Richard Hendrickson discovery, which I exploited to get the identical result: the moment the razor saw touched the body of the car, there was an audible gasp.
Ted's comments are exactly right. Just try it. And if the thought is intimidating, start with an Athearn body--or a Varney reefer.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Paul Hillman
 

Gene Green wrote;

Ah, "analysis-paralysis", eh? I knew I had a problem but I didn't
know it had a name. Are there any self-help groups?

***********************************************************************************
Well, I have a whole "pack" of projects like that in boxes, et al, that I still have to do myself. It is not that I have procrastinated nor suffered paralysis, per se, it is instead that circumstance has lent it's misfortune to prevent me from continuing through with my intended endeavors. But, I have "Set my face like Flint", that SOME day I WILL finish them!!!

When I was 10 years old I made the decision that model railroading would be my life-long hobby, in the face of others asking me, "Are you still 'playing' with those trains?" I suffered this response to a long-haired beauty whom I greatly admired in my youth, to the same question; to wit) "Model railroading is NOT 'playing with trains'! It is three dimensional, animated art, understandable only by the truly gifted in perceiving of such deeper, creative things." After that I believe she became a Nun.

It is true though, that one wisely tends to seek out the most proficient way to approach a project, until it becomes sometimes a self-made, MAJOR project. I have done that often myself, seeking the highest perfection that I could attain, to the point that I've become almost dysfunctional with the project.

The "self-help" would be, like I've done,.....put the project aside for about 20 years, and then tackle it once again. The hiatus will provide a sufficient regrouping of intent about the project, and eventually one might even finish the damned thing!! Never give up!!

Paul Hillman


Doug Brown <brown194@...>
 

In my youth I purchased Quality Craft Models first craftsman kit (as
well as several other craftsman kits), their kit P-1 (PRR kit 1), the
x58A. I built several but most are still kits, some started. I know a
lot more about PRR prototypes now than I did then. Recently I pulled kit
P-1 out of the box it was packed in. I was shocked! The cast ends were
pre-war Dreadnaught. The roof was inset, flat with angle ribs. The side
sills were too high and the sides were too short. The external posts did
not extend far enough down the side sills. It looked like a great kit
when I bought it. I'm glad I didn't build it. Now I have a decent set of
decals and a Cal-Scale H-C underframe set. Now with Branchline roof and
ends, Details West underframe and some styrene strips and wire I am set
to go.

More recently I purchased a Branchline kit marked 7' door, PRR X43C,
figuring I would have to modify it with 8' doors. When I opened the box
I found a car with 8' doors. So it works both ways. I prefer the errors
to be on the box rather than on the contents.

Doug Brown

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Paul Hillman
Sent: Thursday, July 21, 2005 5:28 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Wood Swift Reefers

Gene Green wrote;

Ah, "analysis-paralysis", eh? I knew I had a problem but I didn't
know it had a name. Are there any self-help groups?

************************************************************************
***********
Well, I have a whole "pack" of projects like that in boxes, et al, that
I still have to do myself. It is not that I have procrastinated nor
suffered paralysis, per se, it is instead that circumstance has lent
it's misfortune to prevent me from continuing through with my intended
endeavors. But, I have "Set my face like Flint", that SOME day I WILL
finish them!!!
<snip>

Paul Hillman


Rob & Bev Manley
 

This has nothing to do with Swift reefers but I've found that if you let a project age long enough somebody will come out with a better model.
Like the 17 Golden Spike mechanical reefers I've acquired. I am going to replace the ladders with better components from Branchline. But wait, I don't have to, a better 21st century version is being produced. Same with the AHM / Robins Rail PS- 3-bay covered hopper. I can throw those out with the reefers and my Nickle Plate Pioneer Zephyr.
Actually I have an outlet for my C list equipment. At my church we have a boys youth group and a few years ago built a medium sized railroad in one of our classrooms. It is double track main with 28" min radius and thanks to the guys from Mod-U-Trak has 5 cabs and provisions for an upgrade to DCC. Most of my older Athearn cars and engines are "on loan". Work permitting, I hold work sessions with the kids, try to give them some basic knowledge and fuel the potential of the more train wise boys. Most of them have never railfanned and woldn't recognize the difference between the Athearn 40 ft rolling stock on the layout and a Plate C car on the EJ&E. Thats a good thing because they also won't complain about how difficult a Branchline car is to build or how hard it is to drill for grabs on a Walthers caboose like the "adult" modelers I've heard. These young men appreciate the fact that an adult cares enough to spend some time and share his talents with them. It keps the hobby alive and lets you share information that you would normally take for granted.
Sincerely,
Rob Manley
Midwest Mod-U-Trak

"When building kits is a lost art,
Only lost artists will be building kits !!"

----- Original Message -----
From: Paul Hillman
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, July 21, 2005 5:28 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Wood Swift Reefers


Gene Green wrote;

Ah, "analysis-paralysis", eh? I knew I had a problem but I didn't
know it had a name. Are there any self-help groups?

***********************************************************************************
Well, I have a whole "pack" of projects like that in boxes, et al, that I still have to do myself. It is not that I have procrastinated nor suffered paralysis, per se, it is instead that circumstance has lent it's misfortune to prevent me from continuing through with my intended endeavors. But, I have "Set my face like Flint", that SOME day I WILL finish them!!!

When I was 10 years old I made the decision that model railroading would be my life-long hobby, in the face of others asking me, "Are you still 'playing' with those trains?" I suffered this response to a long-haired beauty whom I greatly admired in my youth, to the same question; to wit) "Model railroading is NOT 'playing with trains'! It is three dimensional, animated art, understandable only by the truly gifted in perceiving of such deeper, creative things." After that I believe she became a Nun.

It is true though, that one wisely tends to seek out the most proficient way to approach a project, until it becomes sometimes a self-made, MAJOR project. I have done that often myself, seeking the highest perfection that I could attain, to the point that I've become almost dysfunctional with the project.

The "self-help" would be, like I've done,.....put the project aside for about 20 years, and then tackle it once again. The hiatus will provide a sufficient regrouping of intent about the project, and eventually one might even finish the damned thing!! Never give up!!

Paul Hillman








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a.. Visit your group "STMFC" on the web.

b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
STMFC-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


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Bill McCoy <bugsy451@...>
 

I expect you are referring to Gary Wright's (Wright Trak)new FGE
mechanical car. The photos from NMRA in Cincinnati look good. I sent
him a Naperville flyer and hope he will come. I too have a small
group of the Golden Spike - Silver Streak - Walthers cars that are
now out of a job. Any one interested please contact me off line.

Bill McCoy
Jax

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, <robev1630@s...> wrote:
This has nothing to do with Swift reefers but I've found that if
you let a project age long enough somebody will come out with a
better model.
Like the 17 Golden Spike mechanical reefers I've acquired. I am
going to replace the ladders with better components from Branchline.
But wait, I don't have to, a better 21st century version is being
produced. Same with the AHM / Robins Rail PS- 3-bay covered hopper.
I can throw those out with the reefers and my Nickle Plate Pioneer
Zephyr.
Actually I have an outlet for my C list equipment. At my church we
have a boys youth group and a few years ago built a medium sized
railroad in one of our classrooms. It is double track main with 28"
min radius and thanks to the guys from Mod-U-Trak has 5 cabs and
provisions for an upgrade to DCC. Most of my older Athearn cars and
engines are "on loan". Work permitting, I hold work sessions with
the kids, try to give them some basic knowledge and fuel the
potential of the more train wise boys. Most of them have never
railfanned and woldn't recognize the difference between the Athearn
40 ft rolling stock on the layout and a Plate C car on the EJ&E.
Thats a good thing because they also won't complain about how
difficult a Branchline car is to build or how hard it is to drill
for grabs on a Walthers caboose like the "adult" modelers I've
heard. These young men appreciate the fact that an adult cares
enough to spend some time and share his talents with them. It keps
the hobby alive and lets you share information that you would
normally take for granted.
Sincerely,
Rob Manley
Midwest Mod-U-Trak

"When building kits is a lost art,
Only lost artists will be building kits !!"
----- Original Message -----
From: Paul Hillman
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, July 21, 2005 5:28 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Wood Swift Reefers


Gene Green wrote;

Ah, "analysis-paralysis", eh? I knew I had a problem but I
didn't
know it had a name. Are there any self-help groups?

*********************************************************************
**************
Well, I have a whole "pack" of projects like that in boxes, et
al, that I still have to do myself. It is not that I have
procrastinated nor suffered paralysis, per se, it is instead that
circumstance has lent it's misfortune to prevent me from continuing
through with my intended endeavors. But, I have "Set my face like
Flint", that SOME day I WILL finish them!!!

When I was 10 years old I made the decision that model
railroading would be my life-long hobby, in the face of others
asking me, "Are you still 'playing' with those trains?" I suffered
this response to a long-haired beauty whom I greatly admired in my
youth, to the same question; to wit) "Model railroading is
NOT 'playing with trains'! It is three dimensional, animated art,
understandable only by the truly gifted in perceiving of such
deeper, creative things." After that I believe she became a Nun.

It is true though, that one wisely tends to seek out the most
proficient way to approach a project, until it becomes sometimes a
self-made, MAJOR project. I have done that often myself, seeking the
highest perfection that I could attain, to the point that I've
become almost dysfunctional with the project.

The "self-help" would be, like I've done,.....put the project
aside for about 20 years, and then tackle it once again. The hiatus
will provide a sufficient regrouping of intent about the project,
and eventually one might even finish the damned thing!! Never give
up!!

Paul Hillman








-------------------------------------------------------------------
-----------
YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS

a.. Visit your group "STMFC" on the web.

b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
STMFC-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms
of Service.


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-----------