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65 ft. gons

ed_mines
 

A man who worked for the Erie in the early 1950s told me he remembered
one customer who always received bales of metal in 65 ft. gons.

Ed

Gatwood, Elden <Elden.Gatwood@...>
 

Ed;
There was a gent with Levinson Steel that told me that they always
received their pipe stock in (PB&NE or somesuch; was that a Beth Steel
road?) 65' gons. I wonder why? Was it cheaper to have big lengths
supplied, than shorter ones?

Elden

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
ed_mines
Sent: Thursday, July 21, 2005 11:04 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] 65 ft. gons

A man who worked for the Erie in the early 1950s told me he remembered
one customer who always received bales of metal in 65 ft. gons.

Ed





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jim_mischke <jmischke@...>
 

No matter what the length, any damage to the pipe ends ruins them.

Before the advent of bulkhead flat cars and bulkhead gondolas, extra
length gondolas were probably very welcome by shippers. The extra
room would allow for a little shifting, and a space buffer from any
other equipment or cars.









--- In STMFC@..., "Gatwood, Elden" <Elden.Gatwood@h...>
wrote:
Ed;
There was a gent with Levinson Steel that told me that they always
received their pipe stock in (PB&NE or somesuch; was that a Beth
Steel
road?) 65' gons. I wonder why? Was it cheaper to have big lengths
supplied, than shorter ones?

Elden

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On
Behalf Of
ed_mines
Sent: Thursday, July 21, 2005 11:04 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] 65 ft. gons

A man who worked for the Erie in the early 1950s told me he
remembered
one customer who always received bales of metal in 65 ft. gons.

Ed





Yahoo! Groups Links

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Jul 21, 2005, at 11:12 AM, Gatwood, Elden wrote:

There was a gent with Levinson Steel that told me that they always
received their pipe stock in (PB&NE or somesuch; was that a Beth Steel
road?) 65' gons. I wonder why? Was it cheaper to have big lengths
supplied, than shorter ones?
Elden, the two RRs owned by Bethlehem were the Patapsco & Back Rivers and the South Buffalo, neither of which owned 65' mill gons in the steam era (though both had Greenville design 52'6" mill gons as modeled by L-L). PB&NE served Bethlehem, PA, though it's not clear from the ORER entries who owned it. PB&NE got 20 65' fixed-end mill gons in 1955, numbered 200-219, and another 30 numbered 220-249 shortly afterward (as they are in the 10/58 ORER).

Gatwood, Elden <Elden.Gatwood@...>
 

Richard;
Thank you for the feedback. That must've been the group that this guy
remembered.

Do you have any idea what type/manufacture gons these were? (I am really
hoping you will say they looked EXACTLY like the new Athearn release,
but with fixed ends...).

Thanks!

Elden

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Richard Hendrickson
Sent: Thursday, July 21, 2005 1:52 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] 65 ft. gons

On Jul 21, 2005, at 11:12 AM, Gatwood, Elden wrote:

There was a gent with Levinson Steel that told me that they always
received their pipe stock in (PB&NE or somesuch; was that a Beth Steel
road?) 65' gons. I wonder why? Was it cheaper to have big lengths
supplied, than shorter ones?
Elden, the two RRs owned by Bethlehem were the Patapsco & Back Rivers
and the South Buffalo, neither of which owned 65' mill gons in the
steam era (though both had Greenville design 52'6" mill gons as modeled
by L-L). PB&NE served Bethlehem, PA, though it's not clear from the
ORER entries who owned it. PB&NE got 20 65' fixed-end mill gons in
1955, numbered 200-219, and another 30 numbered 220-249 shortly
afterward (as they are in the 10/58 ORER).




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Gatwood, Elden <Elden.Gatwood@...>
 

Jim;
Great idea! Thanks for that; it makes sense.

I will try to find out more about this story/industry

Elden

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
jim_mischke
Sent: Thursday, July 21, 2005 1:45 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: 65 ft. gons



No matter what the length, any damage to the pipe ends ruins them.

Before the advent of bulkhead flat cars and bulkhead gondolas, extra
length gondolas were probably very welcome by shippers. The extra
room would allow for a little shifting, and a space buffer from any
other equipment or cars.









--- In STMFC@..., "Gatwood, Elden" <Elden.Gatwood@h...>
wrote:
Ed;
There was a gent with Levinson Steel that told me that they always
received their pipe stock in (PB&NE or somesuch; was that a Beth
Steel
road?) 65' gons. I wonder why? Was it cheaper to have big lengths
supplied, than shorter ones?

Elden

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On
Behalf Of
ed_mines
Sent: Thursday, July 21, 2005 11:04 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] 65 ft. gons

A man who worked for the Erie in the early 1950s told me he
remembered
one customer who always received bales of metal in 65 ft. gons.

Ed





Yahoo! Groups Links





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pieter_roos <pieter.roos@...>
 

In addition, pipe is normally connected end to end over some
distance. Presumably the longer the pieces and fewer the joints, the
better, both from a cost (of the fittings and labor) and maintenance
(places to leak or come apart) view.

Pieter Roos

--- In STMFC@..., "jim_mischke" <jmischke@w...> wrote:


No matter what the length, any damage to the pipe ends ruins them.

Before the advent of bulkhead flat cars and bulkhead gondolas,
extra
length gondolas were probably very welcome by shippers. The extra
room would allow for a little shifting, and a space buffer from
any
other equipment or cars.

--- In STMFC@..., "Gatwood, Elden"
<Elden.Gatwood@h...>
wrote:
Ed;
There was a gent with Levinson Steel that told me that they
always
received their pipe stock in (PB&NE or somesuch; was that a Beth
Steel
road?) 65' gons. I wonder why? Was it cheaper to have big
lengths
supplied, than shorter ones?

Elden

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Jul 21, 2005, at 4:15 PM, Gatwood, Elden wrote:

Richard;
Thank you for the feedback. That must've been the group that this guy
remembered.

Do you have any idea what type/manufacture gons these were? (I am really
hoping you will say they looked EXACTLY like the new Athearn release,
but with fixed ends...)

Sorry, Elden, I've never seen a photo of one, so I have no idea how closely they followed the AAR recommended practice design (if at all).
Richard Hendrickson