Topics

Asparagus and Peaches in SC


Mike Turner <yardcoolieyahoo@...>
 

With all the discussion of FL oranges, I have been wondering about the asparagus shipments from Edgefield county SC.

My dad told me he helped load crates of asparagus into boxcars (maybe reefers) about 1937. The one shipper in Johnston, SC, did about 2 cars a day. Is there any way to put more numbers on this traffic and any destinations?

On a related subject, can anyone tell me where to look to put numbers on peach shipments around 1950?

Would these have shipped via FGE cars?

TIA.

Mike Turner
Simpsonville, SC


Carrock1998@...
 

When I was in high school I worked on a project with a meteorologist from
Rutgers University studying the phases of the moon and whether there was a
correlation between them and frost. This study was done in relation to the peach
farmers in Southern New Jersey. There is a huge area of land there that has
peaches. You might want to check to see if there were shipments originating
there. My conjecture would be that it was mainly shipped to either Philadelphia
or New York City.

Robert "Rocky" Jackson

In a message dated 7/28/2005 6:42:24 AM Central Standard Time,
tgilbert@... writes:
Mike Turner wrote:

With all the discussion of FL oranges, I have been wondering about the
asparagus shipments from Edgefield county SC.

My dad told me he helped load crates of asparagus into boxcars (maybe
reefers) about 1937. The one shipper in Johnston, SC, did about 2 cars a
day. Is there any way to put more numbers on this traffic and any
destinations?
How long was the asparagus season in Johnston? Two weeks? 2 x 14 = 28.


On a related subject, can anyone tell me where to look to put numbers on
peach shipments around 1950?
In 1950, 3,307 tons of fresh peaches not frozen were originated on Class
I RR's in the US. At roughly 25 tons per car, that would be 132
carloads. Those approx. 132 carloads would be originated all over the
nation - not just in South Carolina.


Would these have shipped via FGE cars?
Could have been in Ventilated Boxcars, too in the southeast.

Tim Gilbert


Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

Mike Turner wrote:

With all the discussion of FL oranges, I have been wondering about the
asparagus shipments from Edgefield county SC.

My dad told me he helped load crates of asparagus into boxcars (maybe
reefers) about 1937. The one shipper in Johnston, SC, did about 2 cars a
day. Is there any way to put more numbers on this traffic and any
destinations?
How long was the asparagus season in Johnston? Two weeks? 2 x 14 = 28.


On a related subject, can anyone tell me where to look to put numbers on
peach shipments around 1950?
In 1950, 3,307 tons of fresh peaches not frozen were originated on Class I RR's in the US. At roughly 25 tons per car, that would be 132 carloads. Those approx. 132 carloads would be originated all over the nation - not just in South Carolina.


Would these have shipped via FGE cars?
Could have been in Ventilated Boxcars, too in the southeast.

Tim Gilbert


Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

Carrock1998@... wrote:

When I was in high school I worked on a project with a meteorologist from
Rutgers University studying the phases of the moon and whether there was a
correlation between them and frost. This study was done in relation to the peach
farmers in Southern New Jersey. There is a huge area of land there that has
peaches. You might want to check to see if there were shipments originating
there. My conjecture would be that it was mainly shipped to either Philadelphia
or New York City.
By truck.

Tim Gilbert


pullmanboss <tgmadden@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@s...> wrote:
Carrock1998 wrote:

There is a huge area of land there [southern NJ]
that has
peaches. You might want to check to see if there were shipments
originating
there. My conjecture would be that it was mainly shipped to
either
Philadelphia
or New York City.
Tim Gilbert answered:
By truck.
They were called "truck farms", and there were quite a few in
northern & central New Jersey as well. Learned about them in
geography class in school back in the '40s and the term must have
made quite an impression on me as I still remember it. Along with
the interesting factoid that hemp was grown in the Yucatan and was
used for making rope.

All manner of fruits and (especially) vegetables was grown in New
Jersey truck farms, and in season there would be daily deliveries of
fresh produce to markets in nearby metropolitan areas. There were
(and still are) many roadside stands where motorists could purchase
directly from the growers. Our occasional driving trips to New York
City on Route 46 back then took us through some truck farming areas,
and I don't recall any facilities on the DL&W's old main line
through that same area, other than team tracks at Oxford and
Columbia, for handling such small-lot traffic. The idea of truck
farms was to be close enough to your market to get produce from
field to fork in just a few hours.

Tom Madden


Tim O'Connor
 

Tim Gilbert wrote


In 1950, 3,307 tons of fresh peaches not frozen were originated on Class
I RR's in the US. At roughly 25 tons per car, that would be 132 carloads.

Tim, where did you get that number?? The area around Grand Junction
is a large peach growing region, and in 1950 roads were poor and the
markets distant... And there is a fine 1955 color photo of G.J. yard
absolutely JAMMED with ART ice reefers... more than 100 are visible.
Did peach traffic suddenly expand from 1950 to 1955?

Tim O.


Michael Mang <mnmang@...>
 

My 1950 ICC Revenue Freight Report for the DL&W showed that the DL&W alone
carried 1,240 tons of Peaches, fresh, not frozen in 103 carloads, or 12 tons
per car. No tons were originated on the DL&W, and 9 carloads terminated on
line. The rest were delivered to connecting roads.

It would be interesting to learn why one third of the US peach traffic
passed through the hands of the Lackawanna that year.

Incidentally, looking at other produce entries in the ICC report, it appears
that many of the agricultural commodities were carried in lots around 10-15
tons in size. Even allowing for full ice bunkers, that seems like a light
load.

Michael Mang

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Tim O'Connor
Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2005 9:28 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Asparagus and Peaches in SC


Tim Gilbert wrote


In 1950, 3,307 tons of fresh peaches not frozen were originated on Class
I RR's in the US. At roughly 25 tons per car, that would be 132 carloads.

Tim, where did you get that number?? The area around Grand Junction
is a large peach growing region, and in 1950 roads were poor and the
markets distant... And there is a fine 1955 color photo of G.J. yard
absolutely JAMMED with ART ice reefers... more than 100 are visible.
Did peach traffic suddenly expand from 1950 to 1955?

Tim O.





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Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:


Tim Gilbert wrote


In 1950, 3,307 tons of fresh peaches not frozen were originated on Class
I RR's in the US. At roughly 25 tons per car, that would be 132 carloads.

Tim, where did you get that number?? The area around Grand Junction
is a large peach growing region, and in 1950 roads were poor and the
markets distant... And there is a fine 1955 color photo of G.J. yard
absolutely JAMMED with ART ice reefers... more than 100 are visible.
Did peach traffic suddenly expand from 1950 to 1955?

Tim O.
Whoops! Read the Class II RR data from Table 50 of the 1950 "Blue Book" (ICC's 64th ANNUAL REPORT ON THE STATISTICS OF RAILWAYS IN THE UNITED STATES).

Correct number is 115,210 tons of Fresh Peaches (Not Frozen) originated on US Class I RR's in 1950 (or at the 1956 tons per car loading rate of 15.4 tons) about 7,481 car loads.

Tim Gilbert


Tim O'Connor
 

Tim,

That sounds more like it! Most peach traffic by rail in those days
(and nowadays) probably was canned peaches and preserves. If anyone
has information on the location of major cannery areas in the U.S.
I'd love to hear about it... I know Central California is such a
place.

Whoops! Read the Class II RR data from Table 50 of the 1950 "Blue Book"
(ICC's 64th ANNUAL REPORT ON THE STATISTICS OF RAILWAYS IN THE UNITED
STATES).

Correct number is 115,210 tons of Fresh Peaches (Not Frozen) originated
on US Class I RR's in 1950 (or at the 1956 tons per car loading rate of
15.4 tons) about 7,481 car loads.

Tim Gilbert


Carrock1998@...
 

I know the Ma & Pa Railroad served several canneries in Maryland and
Pennsylvania. I went back and looked up a report from May 22, 1937 that details the
industries they served. The report comes out of the Oppice of the Preseident &
General manager of the railroad located in Baltimore dated May 5, 1937. From
that report here is the canneries they served:

Hillsboro-Queen Anne Cooperative Corporation in Whiteford, Maryland (this had
at least one or more private sidings to it)

C.P. Scarboroguh in Delta, PA
Howard Proctor in Delta, PA

E.G. Ruff in Bryansville, Pennsylvania

J.T. Gemmill in High Rock, Pennsylvania

I don't know what the canneries processed as that is not detailed in the
report. As of 1960 the population of these towns was as follows---Whiteford--120,
Delta--822, Bryansville--25, and High Rock--I don't know.

Therefore, given their population as of 1960---given when the canneries were
operating it doesn't seem like they would have been huge operations.

Robert "Rocky" Jackson

In a message dated 7/28/2005 10:21:57 AM Central Standard Time,
@timboconnor writes:
Tim,

That sounds more like it! Most peach traffic by rail in those days
(and nowadays) probably was canned peaches and preserves. If anyone
has information on the location of major cannery areas in the U.S.
I'd love to hear about it... I know Central California is such a
place.


Carrock1998@...
 

Tom---the Oxford you refer to was it in Pennsylvania or was it in New Jersey?

Robert "Rocky" Jackson

In a message dated 7/28/2005 9:16:53 AM Central Standard Time,
tgmadden@... writes:
I don't recall any facilities on the DL&W's old main line
through that same area, other than team tracks at Oxford and
Columbia, for handling such small-lot traffic. The idea of truck
farms was to be close enough to your market to get produce from
field to fork in just a few hours.

Tom Madden


Carrock1998@...
 

Thanks Tom--now I know roughly where you are talking about---I know it by the
Route 31 number. Thanks.

Robert "Rocky" Jackson

In a message dated 7/28/2005 4:45:23 PM Central Standard Time,
tgmadden@... writes:
Tom---the Oxford you refer to was it in Pennsylvania or was it in
New Jersey?

Oxford Furnace, NJ, a few miles north of Washington NJ on the old main
line. It's on Route 31, which used to be Route 69 until the late '60s
when the local classes of '69 coupled with the sexual connotations of
that number caused the highway signs to disappear faster than they
could be replaced. Route 69/31 ends at the junction with Route 46 at
Butzville, where there was a three-level crossing of the DL&W bridging
the L&HR which itself bridged what I'm remembering was the Pequest
river.

Tom Madden


Fred in Vt. <pennsy@...>
 

Tim & Tom,

The PRR Society's Keystone had an article abot the NJ peach crop, and the express service trains that hauled them to NYC & Phila.. Back about 4 years, IIRC.
Would no doubt be safe in thinking that any seasonal consumable would have a schedule on most east coast RR's; be it reefer, ventilated, or insulated car.

Fred Freitas

----- Original Message -----
From: pullmanboss
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2005 10:16 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Asparagus and Peaches in SC


--- In STMFC@..., Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@s...> wrote:
Carrock1998 wrote:
>
> > There is a huge area of land there [southern NJ]
> > that has
> > peaches. You might want to check to see if there were shipments
> > originating
> > there. My conjecture would be that it was mainly shipped to
> > either
> > Philadelphia
> > or New York City.

Tim Gilbert answered:
> By truck.

They were called "truck farms", and there were quite a few in
northern & central New Jersey as well. Learned about them in
geography class in school back in the '40s and the term must have
made quite an impression on me as I still remember it. Along with
the interesting factoid that hemp was grown in the Yucatan and was
used for making rope.

All manner of fruits and (especially) vegetables was grown in New
Jersey truck farms, and in season there would be daily deliveries of
fresh produce to markets in nearby metropolitan areas. There were
(and still are) many roadside stands where motorists could purchase
directly from the growers. Our occasional driving trips to New York
City on Route 46 back then took us through some truck farming areas,
and I don't recall any facilities on the DL&W's old main line
through that same area, other than team tracks at Oxford and
Columbia, for handling such small-lot traffic. The idea of truck
farms was to be close enough to your market to get produce from
field to fork in just a few hours.

Tom Madden




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Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

Fred in Vt. wrote:

Tim & Tom,

The PRR Society's Keystone had an article abot the NJ peach crop, and the express service trains that hauled them to NYC & Phila.. Back about 4 years, IIRC.
Would no doubt be safe in thinking that any seasonal consumable would have a schedule on most east coast RR's; be it reefer, ventilated, or insulated car.
1) When were these express service trains operated? Before or after trucks?
2) Express Service was not considered to be part of the Freight Commodity Statistics.
3) Is the last sentence a question? Or a statement? Are you referring to originating, through or terminating service?

Tim Gilbert


al_brown03
 

NJ.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@..., Carrock1998@a... wrote:
Tom---the Oxford you refer to was it in Pennsylvania or was it in
New Jersey?

Robert "Rocky" Jackson

In a message dated 7/28/2005 9:16:53 AM Central Standard Time,
tgmadden@w... writes:
I don't recall any facilities on the DL&W's old main line
through that same area, other than team tracks at Oxford and
Columbia, for handling such small-lot traffic. The idea of truck
farms was to be close enough to your market to get produce from
field to fork in just a few hours.

Tom Madden



pullmanboss <tgmadden@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., Carrock1998@a... wrote:
Tom---the Oxford you refer to was it in Pennsylvania or was it in
New Jersey?

Oxford Furnace, NJ, a few miles north of Washington NJ on the old main
line. It's on Route 31, which used to be Route 69 until the late '60s
when the local classes of '69 coupled with the sexual connotations of
that number caused the highway signs to disappear faster than they
could be replaced. Route 69/31 ends at the junction with Route 46 at
Butzville, where there was a three-level crossing of the DL&W bridging
the L&HR which itself bridged what I'm remembering was the Pequest
river.

Tom Madden


Fred in Vt. <pennsy@...>
 

Tim,

I'll dig into the Keystones to look for the specific article & post back what I find.
The 2nd part is a question in as much as it appears from the thread that shipments originated on several east cost lines to major cities. The only one I'm sure of is the PRR, and their use of express hauling to market cities. Would it follow that perishables were expidited;in so far as originating road? On the PRR, they originated & delivered to final destinations; not the case where cars were interchanged by other roads.
Not being a proficient student of RR's south of DC, it becomes a question as to what & how from Fla. up the coast.

Fred Freitas

----- Original Message -----
From: Tim Gilbert
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2005 3:34 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Asparagus and Peaches in SC


Fred in Vt. wrote:

> Tim & Tom,
>
> The PRR Society's Keystone had an article abot the NJ peach
> crop, and the express service trains that hauled them to NYC &
> Phila.. Back about 4 years, IIRC.
> Would no doubt be safe in thinking that any seasonal
> consumable would have a schedule on most east coast RR's; be it
> reefer, ventilated, or insulated car.

1) When were these express service trains operated? Before or after trucks?
2) Express Service was not considered to be part of the Freight
Commodity Statistics.
3) Is the last sentence a question? Or a statement? Are you referring to
originating, through or terminating service?

Tim Gilbert



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Eric
 

Tom Madden wrote:

Also Long Island. I can remember them in the 1970s. Particularly, potatoes. They actually grew
peaches there too. My godfather used to work for NYS DOT and drove all around the island. He'd come
and drop off a basket or two of them in the late summer.

Eric Petersson


"They were called "truck farms", and there were quite a few in
northern & central New Jersey as well. Learned about them in
geography class in school back in the '40s and the term must have
made quite an impression on me as I still remember it. Along with
the interesting factoid that hemp was grown in the Yucatan and was
used for making rope.

All manner of fruits and (especially) vegetables was grown in New
Jersey truck farms, and in season there would be daily deliveries of
fresh produce to markets in nearby metropolitan areas. There were
(and still are) many roadside stands where motorists could purchase
directly from the growers. Our occasional driving trips to New York
City on Route 46 back then took us through some truck farming areas,
and I don't recall any facilities on the DL&W's old main line
through that same area, other than team tracks at Oxford and
Columbia, for handling such small-lot traffic. The idea of truck
farms was to be close enough to your market to get produce from
field to fork in just a few hours."

________________________________________________
Get your own "800" number
Voicemail, fax, email, and a lot more
http://www.ureach.com/reg/tag


Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

Fred in Vt. wrote:

Tim,

I'll dig into the Keystones to look for the specific article & post back what I find.
The 2nd part is a question in as much as it appears from the thread that shipments originated on several east cost lines to major cities. The only one I'm sure of is the PRR, and their use of express hauling to market cities. Would it follow that perishables were expidited;in so far as originating road? On the PRR, they originated & delivered to final destinations; not the case where cars were interchanged by other roads.
Not being a proficient student of RR's south of DC, it becomes a question as to what & how from Fla. up the coast.
The best analysis of reefer movements from the South may be WS Gherke's 1951 PhD dissertation about the Traffic Geography of Seaboard Air Line. Gherke provided a rather complete analysis of all Florida Citrus movements in the 1947-1950 period to States and Railroads. Gherke's dissertation is available from the ACL/SAL HS. Sometime in 2004, I submitted my summary of Gherke's Florida Citrus data to the STMFC - I can't give you, however, a month and day for this submission.

Tim Gilbert


al_brown03
 

Tim's summary is message #30318.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@..., Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@s...> wrote:
Fred in Vt. wrote:

Tim,

I'll dig into the Keystones to look for the specific
article &
post back what I find.
The 2nd part is a question in as much as it appears from
the
thread that shipments originated on several east cost lines to
major
cities. The only one I'm sure of is the PRR, and their use of
express
hauling to market cities. Would it follow that perishables were
expidited;in so far as originating road? On the PRR, they
originated
& delivered to final destinations; not the case where cars were
interchanged by other roads.
Not being a proficient student of RR's south of DC, it
becomes a question as to what & how from Fla. up the coast.
The best analysis of reefer movements from the South may be WS
Gherke's
1951 PhD dissertation about the Traffic Geography of Seaboard Air
Line.
Gherke provided a rather complete analysis of all Florida Citrus
movements in the 1947-1950 period to States and Railroads.
Gherke's
dissertation is available from the ACL/SAL HS. Sometime in 2004, I
submitted my summary of Gherke's Florida Citrus data to the STMFC -
I
can't give you, however, a month and day for this submission.

Tim Gilbert