Devcon Epoxy (was Using CA as a gap filler)


Andy Carlson
 

Yes, I have seen Devcon in a 1 pound package, though a
visit at Devcon's web site yielded nothing about
retail packs.

Some hardware stores sell Devcon's "Liquid Steel"
which to me seems identical to 2-Ton White, except for
the color. I use a little of this black epoxy to give
a nice light grey color to the White 2-Ton.

One nice feature of 2-Ton is its paste-like
consistency, which is useful for casting one piece car
bodies w/o the need for an inner mold. I have a WP N
scale F7A I made years ago (before Kato made their F7)
cast totally in Devcon White 2-Ton, including the
"High Line" pilot mounted snow plow. I still have that
model, and it is holding up just as well as if it were
styrene.

I would again caution against mixing 50:50. I suggest
55:45 White to cream hardener, or a rubbery expoxy
will result.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

--- "Thomas M. Olsen" <tmolsen@UDel.Edu> wrote:

I imagine from Andy's description of the WHITE
2-Ton epoxy, that there
must be several versions of this casting material on
the market.


Tim O'Connor
 

Andy, how do you measure the stuff with such precision? Do
you have a scale, or do you do it by volume? I wonder if the
50:50 ratio works by weight but not volume, or vice versa?

Tim O.

I would again caution against mixing 50:50. I suggest
55:45 White to cream hardener, or a rubbery expoxy
will result.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Andy Carlson
 

Excuse my ear to ear grin as I respond. Precision is
not necessary, nor practiced by me. The epoxy simply
needs to be mixed a little on the "Rich" side for the
White component to get good material. Remember the
tear-off windows on the Front Range kit boxes? I mix
my Devcon on pieces of these cut outs, laying down a
stripe of White first, followed by a stripe of cream
hardener along side the first stripe. It is important
that both tubes have the same sized openings punched
by an awl, so each stripe is the same diameter. When
oozing out the cream hardener, stop where you feel
that it is slightly less than the white stripe. I
often mix amounts that would weigh less than 1/2 gram.
I suggest squeezing out the White component first, as
the cream hardener tends to flow out and flatten,
making eyeball estimates harder.

Also, while I could not believe it, a friend found
that regular rubbing alcohol can be used to thin the
epoxy with little to no observed degradation, so very
low viscous pours can be done. I also clean up the
tools and cardboard mixing board w/ alcohol.

One more thing, if you encounter a situation where you
need to patch a hole (such as plugging a caboose
window), simply stretch a piece of transparent tape
(Scotch) over the opening from the outside, then lay
in the Devcon from the inside. the transparency allows
for visually following the fill, voids will look
black. Allow to cure for at leat 12 hours, and peel
off the tape. You will not have to do any other prep
work, and the patch will be quicker and superior to
cutting and fitting styrene plugs. This is where it is
important to get the 55:45 mix, for if your ratio is
off, the rubbery epoxy will distort as the tape is
peeled off, and a slightly wavy surface will result.
On the other hand, if you want the effect of rippled
patch panels, use that trait to your advantage. You
will be amazed at what can be done with Devcon.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA



--- timboconnor@comcast.net wrote:

Andy, how do you measure the stuff with such
precision? Do
you have a scale, or do you do it by volume? I
wonder if the
50:50 ratio works by weight but not volume, or vice
versa?

Tim O.



I would again caution against mixing 50:50. I
suggest
55:45 White to cream hardener, or a rubbery expoxy
will result.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


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Tim O'Connor
 

Andy, that was inspiring! In fact, I am thinking that this may be
a very good way to fill in the open spaces on the Intermountain
USRA composite gondola -- instead of trying to fit styrene plugs.

Moreover, a wavy result for the panels would be exactly the look
I'd want for a beat up gondola!!

Tim O'Connor


Rob Kirkham <rdkirkham@...>
 

I'm jumping into this topic late, but have one question for clarification: the 50/50 mix that leads to rubbery panels - I take it that is short term and the stuff hardens out over time?????? Otherwise I can't see much use for the rubbery mix even for wavy panels.

Rob Kirkham


Andy Carlson
 

Rob, the epoxy will always be rubbery.
-Andy Carlson

--- Rob Kirkham <rdkirkham@shaw.ca> wrote:

... have one

question for clarification:
the 50/50 mix that leads to rubbery panels - I take
it that is short term
and the stuff hardens out over time?????? Otherwise
I can't see much use
for the rubbery mix even for wavy panels.


jaley <jaley@...>
 

If that's the case, I wonder why they would *want* to dispense / recommend
a 50/50 mix.

I'm not saying you're wrong, I'm just saying it's strange. Is there some
common application where rubbery epoxy would be desired?

Regards,

-Jeff

On Aug 1, 8:28am, Andy Carlson wrote:
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Devcon Epoxy (was Using CA as a gap filler)
Rob, the epoxy will always be rubbery.
-Andy Carlson

--- Rob Kirkham <rdkirkham@shaw.ca> wrote:

... have one
question for clarification:
the 50/50 mix that leads to rubbery panels - I take
it that is short term
and the stuff hardens out over time?????? Otherwise
I can't see much use
for the rubbery mix even for wavy panels.
--
Jeff Aley jaley@pcocd2.intel.com
DPG Chipsets Product Engineering
Intel Corporation, Folsom, CA
(916) 356-3533