Perishable Meat Traffic east of Chicago--1950


Greg Martin
 

Here is a sneak preview of what to expect from the Greedy/Singer
Naperville/Cocoa Beach seminar regarding meat and perishable traffic in 1950
interchanged east in Chicago (although their seminar covers both east and westbound
movements)...

Some have said the Pennsy didn't handle much of the traffic in perishable
meat... Here are some staggering numbers...

Pennsy handled 32,374 loads fresh meat (an additional 5'100 loads of
canned/smoked or cooked meat)...

B&O handled 23`607 loads of fresh meat ("on the hanger")...

Erie handled 20,515 loads of fresh meat...

NKP handled 45`877 loads of fresh meat...

TP&W handled 5,963 loads of fresh meat...

Interesting facts to note the Lackawanna handled more than the Erie...

Also the NYCS reporting to the ICC is cloudy because the subsidiary lines
are not broken out with the exception of the P&LE so numbers are still being
studied...

The TP&W nearly matches the Union Pacific in it westbound traffic (UP was
second to ATSF)

The SP handled less fresh meat than the TP&W in fresh meat or the PRR in
canned/coked or smoked meat. Again, this has to do with the population as well.

I will not be in Naperville this year but will see the seminar in Cocoa
beach this winter. It should be a good one with routing and connections galore...
and it covers from 1950 through 1957 when market turned down to trucks.

Greg Martin


Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Greg Martin wrote:
Some have said the Pennsy didn't handle much of the traffic in perishable
meat... Here are some staggering numbers...
Pennsy handled 32,374 loads fresh meat (an additional 5'100 loads of
canned/smoked or cooked meat)...
I don't know much about meat shipping, compared to produce, but it was PRR's very high claims rate on produce shipments which directed SFRD and PFE away from its lines as much as possible. To put these "staggering" numbers in perspective, in 1950 PFE shipped more than 417,000 loads of produce. They made sure as little of it as physically possible went over the PRR. I don't have SFRD shipment numbers, but Tim G. may have.
I would certainly agree with Greg in that reefers visible in photos of PRR and B&O trains are certainly predominantly meat cars.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
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Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

Some time ago I related that carloads of premium beef from the Estherville, IA Morrell plant (Rock Island RR ) aparently was sent to the east coast with only a nominal destination, and no definite buyer. The plant manager in the meantime was negotiating by teletype the actual sale of the beef, which would presumably require at least some times an en route change in ultimate destination, and routing.

My understanding of this process is incomplete, but I recall this from the manager (a neighbor, and sometime tenant), and my own experience in working in the plant itself (1950-56).

I do not know how prevalent this practice might have been.

Denny